International Journal of Management and Sustainability

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An Architecture for Personal Achievement Evaluation System in An University By Applying Open Source ECM and Bi Software

Pages: 16-23
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An Architecture for Personal Achievement Evaluation System in An University By Applying Open Source ECM and Bi Software

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Muslin Ridhrod , Taratip Suwannasart , Arthit Thongtak

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Muslin Ridhrod , Taratip Suwannasart , Arthit Thongtak (2014). An Architecture for Personal Achievement Evaluation System in An University By Applying Open Source ECM and Bi Software. International Journal of Management and Sustainability, 3(2): 16-23. DOI:
Personal achievement evaluation process is necessary to understand each employee’s abilities, competencies, and relative merits which are very important for an organization. The results of evaluation process are analyzed between achievement targets and actual achievement scores, which are collected and stored from many data sources and documents such as evaluation patterns, groups of person, and kinds of workload. Furthermore, for each evaluation period, flexible policies and procedures are needed. This study presents an architecture for personal achievement evaluation system in an university by using an open source ECM software tool for managing their links of the supporting document with actual data, and BI technology is used to inspect, evaluate, and create personal achievement reports by applying open source software principles to be able to gather all data and store the supporting documents into an evaluation database. XML schema is a dynamic mechanism for managing constant change. We propose a formulate principle and an implementation procedure which is expected to be able to apply with other university’s departments to support their personal achievement evaluation process.
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FDI in Indian Retail Sector: Strategic Issues and Implications

Pages: 24-41
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FDI in Indian Retail Sector: Strategic Issues and Implications

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Citation: 1

A. Vijayakumar

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A. Vijayakumar (2014). FDI in Indian Retail Sector: Strategic Issues and Implications. International Journal of Management and Sustainability, 3(2): 24-41. DOI:
The spectacular and unprecedented growth of FDI in the global economic landscape over the last two decades has made it an integral part of the development strategy of both the developed and developing nations. It acts as major catalyst in the development of a country through up-gradation of technology, managerial skills and capabilities in various sectors. Indian retail industry is one of the sunrise sectors with huge growth potential. According to the Investment Commission of India, the retail sector is expected to grow almost three times its current levels to $660 billion by 2015. However, in spite of the recent developments in retail sector and its immense contribution to the economy, it continues to be the least evolved industries in India when compared to the rest of the world. This dismal situation of the retail sector despite the ongoing wave of incessant liberalization and globalization stems from the absence of an FDI encouraging policy in the Indian retail sector. Until 2011, Indian government denied FDI in multi-brand retail, forbidding foreign groups from any retail outlets. In November 2011, India’s central government announced retail reforms. FDI in the retail can expand markets by reducing transaction and transformation costs of business through adoption of advanced supply chain and benefit consumers and suppliers. Oppositions have raised concerns about employment losses, promotion of unhealthy competition among organized domestic retailers resulting in exist of small domestic retailers from the market and distortion of urban cultural development. This paper captures the existing retail scenario in India and presents the limitations of the current set-up. The paper discusses about opening up of the retail sector to FDI by the government and tracks the efforts taken by the government with regard to foreign direct investment in retail sector. The paper also analyzes the reason why foreign retailers are interested in India, the strategies they are adopting to enter India and their prospects in India. The present paper also focuses on the strategic issues and implications of FDI retail in India and the major challenges that it faces.
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How to Use Cobit Applications in Educational Institutes

Pages: 42-50
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How to Use Cobit Applications in Educational Institutes

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Citation: 1

K. L. Ertürk , G. Sengül , M. Rehan

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  1. Chen, G., 2009. IT service system design and management of educational information system. The 1st International Conference on Information Science and Engineering (ICISE2009).
  2. Grant, G. and G. Anderson, 2002. Chapter 3 customer relationship management. A Vision for Higher Education Customer Relationship Management.
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K. L. Ertürk , G. Sengül , M. Rehan (2014). How to Use Cobit Applications in Educational Institutes. International Journal of Management and Sustainability, 3(2): 42-50. DOI:
Decision makers are looking at all expenditures to see where to cut costs and install greater IT systems management efficiencies. For implementation of an IT governance program successfully, it is important to understand management needs. IT service management is becoming more important in any kind of business sector including in higher education sector or university education. In the university education system, it can be used to enhance competitiveness and performance of related stakeholders. IT infrastructure is growing increasingly complex as different technological advancements, such as IT governance (by some special methodologies like Control Objectives for Information and Related Technology (CoBIT) & Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) etc.) and cloud computing, continue to enhance higher education networks. These systems management solutions can be very helpful to facilitate greater collaboration in learning and educational management. In this study we investigated the problems of the Atılım University students ‘n Turkey about the course control system (Focusing on Time-Table scheduling system). In the survey we asked questions about registration process, time table managements, exam time clashes, course loads, student satisfaction about the time table and exam allocation system. The results are gathered, analyzed and documented and the results are discussed. Depending on the results we proposed a CoBIT methodology to improve the student satisfaction.
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Hospital At Home: Sustainable Healthcare in Developing Countries through Reducing Average Length of Stay in Hospitals

Pages: 51-61
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Hospital At Home: Sustainable Healthcare in Developing Countries through Reducing Average Length of Stay in Hospitals

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Citation: 4

Veerasingam Nerminathan , Wan Noor Amalyna Binti Wan Fadzil Adlan , Arany A. Nerminathan

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  1. Awofeso, N., A. Rammohan and A. Asmaripa, 2012. Exploring Indonesia’s lowhospitalbedutilization-lowbedoccupancy- highdiseaseburden paradox. J HospAdm [Internet]. 2012 Nov 22 [cited 2013 Sep 13], 2(1): 49-58. Available from http://www.sciedu.ca/journal/index.php/jha/article/view/1829/1082. DOI 10.5430/jha.v2n1p49.
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Veerasingam Nerminathan , Wan Noor Amalyna Binti Wan Fadzil Adlan , Arany A. Nerminathan (2014). Hospital At Home: Sustainable Healthcare in Developing Countries through Reducing Average Length of Stay in Hospitals. International Journal of Management and Sustainability, 3(2): 51-61. DOI:
Increasing health costs is becoming a burden for countries all over the world, and for the developing countries, it may reach a point where the government may not be able to provide the healthcare demanded by the public. It is not solely based on increasing the health spending; every aspect of health expenditure should be considered to improve efficiency. One of the aims of the tenth Malaysian plan is improving efficiency and reducing waste. We propose a measure to improve efficiency by decreasing the average length of stay, given the fact that hospital care is far more expensive than care in the community. Planned and managed early discharge to the homes, supported by community nurses and doctors, in addition to improved communications, can reduce average length of stay. At present the length of stay is 3.52 days in the public sector and 2.71 days in the private sector. There is a significant variation between states, not only for the average length of stay, but also for the bed turnover interval; providing less of an incentive for earlier discharge. By reducing the length of stay by merely 0.5 days, we suggest there would be savings up to RM250 million savings each year, and with other additional measures, there would be significant savings, making healthcare more affordable and sustainable, making Malaysia a shining example among developing countries.
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Government and Poverty Alleviation in Ondo State, Nigeria

Pages: 62-71
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Government and Poverty Alleviation in Ondo State, Nigeria

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Citation: 4

Akinmulegun Sunday Ojo

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  1. Adawo, M.A., 2010. Poverty reduction in Nigeria: A necessary agenda. Current Research  Journal of Economic Theory, 3(1): 14-19.
  2. Adawo, M.A., 2010. Poverty in Uyo: Characteristics, causes and consequences. Current  Research Journal of Economic Theory, 4(1): 31-36.
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  12. Samuelson, P.A., 1976. Economics. London: McGraw Hill Ltd.
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Akinmulegun Sunday Ojo (2014). Government and Poverty Alleviation in Ondo State, Nigeria. International Journal of Management and Sustainability, 3(2): 62-71. DOI:
Poverty is a household name most especially in the Third World Nations. However, it is a plague that affects all people across the globe. Governments at all levels had embarked on policies and measures at different times to eradicate this menace to no effect. Thus, the phenomenon ‘poverty alleviation’ emanated. This paper therefore examined different measures embarked upon by governments in Nigeria in general and Ondo State in particular with special attention on government activities since the inception of Democracy in 1999. Efforts were made to engage in descriptive comparative analysis of the efforts by successive governments in the state, using econometric analysis of simple ratios and percentages. Most importantly, an in-depth examination of the policies of the present day government (the Dr. Olusegun Mimiko-led administration) was carried out. Not only this, the extent to which these measures had affected the lives of common man on the street was also examined. It was thus found out that the present day administration was able to achieve so much in poverty reduction in the state basically as a result of its grass root (house-to-house, door-to-door) policies implementation. The paper therefore recommends that for a government to achieve its set goal of affecting the lives of her people, such people-based (see-and-buy) policies of the present day administration in Ondo state must be the main stream of such an administration. The type of unmonitored delegation; “money-must-pass-hands” policies where governance is maladapted and hide and seek; corruption laden governance prevail in the administration of a state must be totally jettisoned as this aid diversion of public funds, breeds corruption and enhances poverty.
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Foreign Direct Investment Affluences in Iskandar Malaysia

Pages: 72-83
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Foreign Direct Investment Affluences in Iskandar Malaysia

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Citation: 2

Patmawati Ibrahim , Maimunah Ali

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Patmawati Ibrahim , Maimunah Ali (2014). Foreign Direct Investment Affluences in Iskandar Malaysia. International Journal of Management and Sustainability, 3(2): 72-83. DOI:
Iskandar Malaysia is one of the regional economic growth areas that have been identified by the government of Malaysia to spearhead economic transformation programmes as stipulated in the Tenth Malaysia Plan. The aims of the economic transformation programmes are to address the declining trend in foreign investment and outflow of human capital, as well as to spur the next stage of economic development. Thus, Iskandar Malaysia serves as the platform to highlight Malaysia’s structural shift to broader macro objectives that aims to transform Malaysia into a developed nation by a knowledge-based economy. Since its inception in 2006, Iskandar Malaysia has attracted foreign investments of about RM111.4 billion as of the first quarter of 2013 and 40% of the investments has already been realised. The entry of heavyweights foreign investors such as Temasek, Ascendas, CapitaLand, China’s Country Garden and Australia’ Walker Corp have propelled foreign direct investment (FDI) flows into Iskandar Malaysia, making it highly dependent on foreign funds for development. Although FDI is the key catalytic agent of economic growth and development, it is not without pitfalls and setbacks, especially on local community and average households in Johore. The aim of this paper therefore, is to examine the affluences and setbacks of FDI in Iskandar Malaysia on average local households across the five flagship zones of Iskandar. The study would include analysing the impact of FDI on culture and social-economic environments as well as on natural surroundings in the Iskandar area, and subsequently, attempts to touch on the sustainability of FDI in maintaining rapid economic progress of Iskandar Malaysia.
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Poverty Alleviation and Long-Term Sustainability of Microfinance Project: With Special Reference to Matale District

Pages: 84-96
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Poverty Alleviation and Long-Term Sustainability of Microfinance Project: With Special Reference to Matale District

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Citation: 5

P.W.N.A. Kumari , P.J. Kumara Singhe

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  1. Azad, A. and M. Shamsuddoha, 2004. Assessing impact of micro finance on poverty alleviation-Bangladesh Perspective. Available from http://ssrn.com/abstract=1302291.
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P.W.N.A. Kumari , P.J. Kumara Singhe (2014). Poverty Alleviation and Long-Term Sustainability of Microfinance Project: With Special Reference to Matale District. International Journal of Management and Sustainability, 3(2): 84-96. DOI:
This research is attempted to assess the strengths of poverty alleviation initiatives taken by foreign donors in Sri Lanka. Hence research basically studied the Matale Regional Economic Advancement Project (MREAP) which was funded by the International fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD). Study was based on both primary and the secondary data. Primary data were collected through interviews held with project officers, beneficiaries and other government officers who were involved with various activities in project villages. Descriptive analysis, , double difference method, and the regression analysis were the analytical tools used in data analysis. According to the results of the double difference analysis and the descriptive analysis microfinance facility provided by the MREAP has influenced significantly on income levels of the beneficiaries. In general, microfinance has influenced positively on poverty alleviation of beneficiaries. According to the beneficiaries MREAP was a successful project as it provided microfinance for the appropriate businesses during the project implementation period but, neither MREAP nor other government organization have monitored the sustainability of project activities. Analysis of the project reveals that Microfinance is one of the effective tools in poverty alleviation in Sri Lanka and, it is very essential to provide a healthy macroeconomic environment avoiding unnecessary political intervention for the microfinance projects to function effectively and efficiently. This information revels that monitoring of long term sustainability of the activities initiated during the project period after the termination of the project is a vital facto that due attention of relevant authorities should be received.
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Does Risk Management Affect On Bank Efficiency? An Analysis of Sri Lankan Banking Sector

Pages: 97-110
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Does Risk Management Affect On Bank Efficiency? An Analysis of Sri Lankan Banking Sector

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Citation: 7

J.M. Ruwani Fernando , P.D. Nimal

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  1. Altunbas, Y., M.H. Liu, P. Molyneux and R. Seth, 2000. Efficiency and risk in Japanese banking. Journal of Banking and Finance, 24(10): 1605-1628.
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J.M. Ruwani Fernando , P.D. Nimal (2014). Does Risk Management Affect On Bank Efficiency? An Analysis of Sri Lankan Banking Sector. International Journal of Management and Sustainability, 3(2): 97-110. DOI:
Increasing competition in the finance sector in Sri Lank has created a huge competition among the banking sector. The high level of competition improved the bank efficiency and efficiency creates risk to the banks. Therefore, risk management is a vital in achieving efficiency. Therefore, this study addresses the question on “whether the Sri Lankan banks are efficient and how risk management improves the banks’ efficiency?. The main objective of the study was to identify the efficiency of the banks by incorporating risk factors. This study adopted second Stage Data Envelopment Analysis based on Licensed Domestic Commercial Banks in Sri Lanka for the period from 2005 to 2011. At the first stage it use DEA to finds the efficiency scores by incorporating risk factors such as Credit, Market and Operational risk. In the second stage it applies Tobit regression to find the influence of external environment factors on bank efficiency. The mean efficiency of Sri Lankan banks is high when it compares with the other well countries such as India, UK, US, Taiwan and Islamic Banks located in London. Risk management has improved the efficiency of the Licensed Commercial Banks in Sri Lanka. Therefore, banks should identify their standing on the market on efficiency levels and should analyze their inefficiencies to improve the efficiencies further.
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