International Journal of Education and Practice

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Impact of Co-Teaching Approach in Inclusive Education Settings on the Development of Reading Skills

Pages: 1-17
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Impact of Co-Teaching Approach in Inclusive Education Settings on the Development of Reading Skills

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2020.81.1.17

Ozlem Dagli Gokbulut , Gonul Akcamete , Ahmet Guneyli

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Ozlem Dagli Gokbulut , Gonul Akcamete , Ahmet Guneyli (2020). Impact of Co-Teaching Approach in Inclusive Education Settings on the Development of Reading Skills. International Journal of Education and Practice, 8(1): 1-17. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2020.81.1.17
This study was conducted on three students with special education needs and their 16 non-disabled classmates in the 2nd year of an elementary school in Cyprus where inclusive education is offered to them and their parents. In the mentioned inclusive education setting, student and parent opinions with regard to the effectiveness of reading comprehension applications based on a one teacher one assistant model, which is a co-teaching model, conducted by the classroom teacher and special education teacher, have been evaluated. For this purpose, opinions have been obtained from students during the application that consisted of 14 sessions between October 2017 and January 2018 and from parents after the applications with regard to the effectiveness of the co-teaching practice using semi-structured interview forms. When the research findings were evaluated, it was seen that the students felt happy, successful and academically prepared during the co-teaching practices, they found the materials used by their teachers interesting, they were willing to attend the class, and were pleased to be in the school / classroom environment. When the findings of the parents' opinions were evaluated, the parents stated that they had some concerns prior to the co-teaching practices were implemented. However, they stated that the variety of materials and homework used during the practices and seeing their child's academic progress made parents feel at ease with the new approach. The parents also stated that the reading skills of their children had improved, their willingness to read had improved and their writing skills had improved as well.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the existing literature in terms of reflecting on the perspectives of both parents and students on the effectiveness of co-teaching. It is assumed that not only children with special needs but also children with normal development will benefit from co-teaching. In particular, it is believed that families, who are key stakeholders in special education, will develop increased awareness regarding the actions they can take to support the development of their children.

Development of Learning Videos for Junior High School Math Subject to Enhance Mathematical Reasoning

Pages: 18-25
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Development of Learning Videos for Junior High School Math Subject to Enhance Mathematical Reasoning

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2020.81.18.25

Rasiman . , Dina Prasetyowati , Kartinah .

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Rasiman . , Dina Prasetyowati , Kartinah . (2020). Development of Learning Videos for Junior High School Math Subject to Enhance Mathematical Reasoning. International Journal of Education and Practice, 8(1): 18-25. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2020.81.18.25
This study aimed to develop Mathematics learning media in the form of learning videos in order to enhance the reasoning abilities of students of Mathematics Education Study Program.. This study used the development model to construct products in the form of learning videos on topics like Surface Area of Cuboid, Cube, Prism and Pyramid. To achieve this purpose, the ADDIE, Analyse, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation, development model was used, In this study; the steps conducted only reached the Development stage. Based on the validation of media experts, the percentage of the feasibility of learning media obtained was 95.15%. After being converted into a scale conversion table the percentage of the achievement level of 95.15% was in very good criteria. This proved that the learning video on the material surface area of the Cuboid, Cube, Prism and Pyramid were feasible to be applied in learning. Then, it was validated by material experts and based on expert validation, in terms of media aspects, material substance aspects, and learning design aspects which was scored at 90.86%. After being converted to a percentage scale conversion table the level of achievement of 90.86% was again in very good criteria. This led to conclude that the learning videos of the material surface area of Cuboid, Cube, Prism and Pyramid were feasible to be applied in research by making improvements in the order of material delivery.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes to the existing literature related to the development of instructional media such as learning videos as Mathematics learning media to enhance the reasoning abilities of students of Mathematics Education Study Program at Universitas PGRI, Semarang.

The Moderating Effect of Age on Preschool Teachers Trait Emotional Intelligence in Greece and Implications for Preschool Human Resources Management

Pages: 26-36
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The Moderating Effect of Age on Preschool Teachers Trait Emotional Intelligence in Greece and Implications for Preschool Human Resources Management

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2020.81.26.36

Anastasiou, S.

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Anastasiou, S. (2020). The Moderating Effect of Age on Preschool Teachers Trait Emotional Intelligence in Greece and Implications for Preschool Human Resources Management. International Journal of Education and Practice, 8(1): 26-36. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2020.81.26.36
Preschool teachers play a significant role in nurturing the social and emotional development of young children. Moreover, their own social and emotional skills can influence how they instruct their pupils in emotional intelligence (EI). This study aimed to examine the individual dimensions of trait emotional intelligence (TEI) for preschool teachers working in Ioannina, the capital city of Epirus in northwestern Greece, using the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire–Short Form (TEIQue–SF). The mean EI score of the participants was 4.98(±0.57), with a small number having EI scores either below 4 (1.61%) or above 6 (1.76%), while the majority had a mean EI score between 4–5 (49.18%) and 5–6 (47.54%). Although no effect of age or experience on overall EI was found, age was negatively correlated with emotionality on the one hand and positively with sociability on the other. This trend toward a moderate increase in sociability as teachers grow older may reflect their different backgrounds and experiences. Educational administrators should direct resources toward safeguarding and enhancing the preschool teachers’ EI at all stages of their careers.
Contribution/ Originality
This study establishes the effect of age on certain aspects of preschool teachers’ emotional intelligence in Greece. The results can be used for future developments and human resources management, particularly for monitoring, safeguarding, and enhancing preschool teachers’ EI at all stages of their careers.