Animal Review

Published by: Conscientia Beam
Online ISSN: 2409-6490
Print ISSN: 2412-3382
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No. 2

Effects of Segregated Early Weaning at 7 Days on Dams Body Condition, Parturition Interval and Offspring Birth Weight and Litter Size in the Agouti (Dasyprocta Leporina) for Intensive Production

Pages: 24-31
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Effects of Segregated Early Weaning at 7 Days on Dams Body Condition, Parturition Interval and Offspring Birth Weight and Litter Size in the Agouti (Dasyprocta Leporina) for Intensive Production

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar.2019.62.24.31

Riyadh Mohammed , Kavita Kemeela Sant , Gary Wayne Garcia

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Riyadh Mohammed , Kavita Kemeela Sant , Gary Wayne Garcia (2019). Effects of Segregated Early Weaning at 7 Days on Dams Body Condition, Parturition Interval and Offspring Birth Weight and Litter Size in the Agouti (Dasyprocta Leporina) for Intensive Production. Animal Review, 6(2): 24-31. DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar.2019.62.24.31
There has been limited information reported on the impacts of segregated early weaning on agouti (Dasyprocta leporina) dams. The study lasted 485 days where 4 parturitions were recorded from 12 (2 year old) multiparous dams, hence there were 48 (12 x 4) parturitions in total with 100 offspring being born. Data was collected on 1) the live weight gain of dams (+/- g), 2) re-conception time and parturition interval (through theoretical calculations assuming that the gestation period was 104 days), 3) litter size at each parturition 4) weight of each individual offspring born per litter as a % of dams’ live weight and 5) the ratio of offspring sex at each parturition. Results showed that dams can reconceive and have a successive parturition as early as 119 days after the day of her previous parturition. Average live weight gain after 4 consecutive parturitions for dams were 276g. Average offspring weights increased by approximately 23 g (193 g to 216g) after 4 parturitions when weaned at 7 days. Average litter size per dam increased by 33% (1.75 to 2.33) after 4 parturitions when weaned at 7 days. Litter size as a percentage of dam’s body weight increased by 0.11% (5.47 to 5.58) after 4 parturitions when weaned at 7 days. This study concludes that weaning at 7 days post-partum is very beneficial for dams’ body condition and re conception, offspring growth and development and for continuous reproduction in an intensive production unit.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated the impacts of segregated early weaning on agouti (Dasyprocta leporina). Weaning at 7 days post-partum is very beneficial for dams’ body condition and re conception, offspring growth and development and for continuous reproduction in an intensive production unit.

Supernumerary Teats in Kalahari Red Goats in the Humid Tropics

Pages: 17-23
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Supernumerary Teats in Kalahari Red Goats in the Humid Tropics

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar.2019.62.17.23

Famakinde, S.A. , Okwelum N. , Leigh, O.O.

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Famakinde, S.A. , Okwelum N. , Leigh, O.O. (2019). Supernumerary Teats in Kalahari Red Goats in the Humid Tropics. Animal Review, 6(2): 17-23. DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar.2019.62.17.23
Supernumerary teats (SNT) are additional to the usual number of teats found on a cow (four), goat or sheep (two). Information has been provided on the occurrence of teat abnormalities in the indigenous goat breeds in Nigeria but there remains a dearth of information on the incidence of teat abnormalities in the Kalahari red goats (KRG). Fifty two female lactating KRG aged between 2-5 years were classified on the basis of the number of SNT by visual appraisal. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and independent sample T-test. 76.1% of the population possesses SNT, 10.9% had one, 43.5% had two, 10.9% had three while 10.9% had four SNT. 60% of the population of KRG with SNT had none of such teats functional/patent. 11.4% had one patent SNT, 25.7% had two patent SNT, 2.9% had four patent SNT. The location of the SNT in relation to the primary teat reveals that 86.3% of the SNT are cranial, 1.3% of the SNT are caudal, 10.0% of the SNT are medial while 2.5% of the SNT are lateral. 74.36% of KRG studied had symmetrical udders while 25.45% had asymmetrical udder. The study concluded that possible reproductive implications of high percentage of SNT in KRG may include neonatal death of kids especially in multiple births and higher risk of mastitis in does. Reproductive Veterinarians and breeders should watch out for goats with SNT when carrying out breeding soundness examination.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of the few studies which have investigated the occurrence of Supernumerary teats in the Kalahari red goats with its reproductive implications. The study also provides one of the earliest reports of Supernumerary teats that are positioned lateral and medial to the primary teat in the goat.