International Journal of Public Policy and Administration Research

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Online ISSN: 2312-6515
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No. 2

Contracting Out: What Works, What Doesn’t and Why?

Pages: 64-79
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Contracting Out: What Works, What Doesn’t and Why?

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Tawanda Zinyama

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Tawanda Zinyama (2014). Contracting Out: What Works, What Doesn’t and Why?. International Journal of Public Policy and Administration Research, 1(2): 64-79. DOI:
Contracting out, as an economic policy instrument, began to gain attractiveness in both developed and developing countries following the apparent successful results in United Kingdom and United States.  The rhythm of contracting out in Sub-Saharan Africa has increased in order to enhance service delivery. The purpose of this study is to give a critical review of the theoretical framework of contracting out.  The specific objectives include: to examine major extant and/or evolving contracting out theoretical paradigms and their relevance to the public sector management; challenges encountered in contracting out and factors influencing successful contracting out. The review discusses gaps in the literature and the directions in which future studies may address these gaps.
Contribution/ Originality
The paper critically reviewed the contracting out theoretical framework specifically focusing on the strengths and weaknesses of each theory. The gaps in the literature were indentified and the directions future studies should address were outlined. The institutional and capacity issues have been identified. It also exposed the critical need for capacity within the government to develop and monitor contracts.

Anti-Corruption Crusade in Nigeria: More Words Than Deeds

Pages: 47-63
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Anti-Corruption Crusade in Nigeria: More Words Than Deeds

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Citation: 1

Igbokwe-Ibeto Chinyeaka Justine , Joseph Chukwuneke Okoye

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Igbokwe-Ibeto Chinyeaka Justine , Joseph Chukwuneke Okoye (2014). Anti-Corruption Crusade in Nigeria: More Words Than Deeds. International Journal of Public Policy and Administration Research, 1(2): 47-63. DOI:
It is generally agreed that corruption is an evil wind that affect everyone and retard societal progress. While there are several theories that explain its prevalence in society, the point to emphasize is that it has become a way of life in Nigeria. This explains why it has been difficult to combat its rising profile. Within the framework of nature of society, neo-patrimonialism, prebendalism, economy of affection, and political god-fatherism theories, an eclectic approach. The paper examines the structural basis of corruption in the country and efforts’ being made by anti-graft agencies to combat the scourge. It is the position of the paper that given the effect of corruption on national development, the fight against corruption is a war that must be won. Therefore, all hands must be on deck to expunge this scourge from the nation’s body polity. The first fundamental step among other measures to redress the prevalence of corruption in the polity is to transform the state from an alien force to an entity that caters for the welfare and well-being of the people. Yet, the need for patriotic and visionary leaders that will show the way out in the fight against this common enemy (corruption) through personal example, irrespective of whose ox is gored cannot be overemphasized.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is a contribution to the existing literature on corruption and the fight of corruption in Nigeria. The study’s contribution to knowledge can also been in the area of interrogation and integrating some of the theories explaining the nature and prevalence of corruption in Nigeria.

The Role of Information and Communication Technology in Rural Socio-Economic Development in Africa

Pages: 38-46
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The Role of Information and Communication Technology in Rural Socio-Economic Development in Africa

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Citation: 7

Maxwell C.C. Musingafi , Shupikai Zebron

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Maxwell C.C. Musingafi , Shupikai Zebron (2014). The Role of Information and Communication Technology in Rural Socio-Economic Development in Africa. International Journal of Public Policy and Administration Research, 1(2): 38-46. DOI:
In this paper we discuss the role, challenges, and benefits of information and communication technology (ICT) in the rural areas development efforts and processes in Africa. Modern ICT is largely about the capability to electronically input, process, store, output, transmit, and receive data and information. The efficient use of ICT, driven by better high-speed internet (broadband) access, is widely recognised as key to raising productivity and stimulating innovation in the global village. During the last decade, largely due to the spread of mobile phone technology in rural areas, ICTs have demonstrated the positive and significant impact they can have on economic development by improving the business environment in rural areas. ICT provides access to market and business information, brings financial services literally to the hands of rural consumers, helps local communities organise and link themselves, and, through the connection with others, exchange know-how and ideas. ICT plays a significant role in promoting entrepreneurship and economic progress in rural areas, contributing to improve the competitiveness of agriculture and forestry, the quality of life and diversification of the rural economy. High-quality Internet provision helps unlock the potential of rural areas, and thus makes them more attractive places to live. ICT helps existing businesses to perform tasks more effectively and efficiently and respond to their demand for rapid access to diverse kinds of information. 
Contribution/ Originality