International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Research

Published by: Conscientia Beam
Online ISSN: 2312-6477
Print ISSN: 2313-0393
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No. 4

Perception of Kogi State University Agricultural Students on Farming as a Career

Pages: 72-81
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Perception of Kogi State University Agricultural Students on Farming as a Career

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.70/2016.3.4/70.4.72.81

Saliu O.J. , Onuche . U. , Abubakar . H.

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Saliu O.J. , Onuche . U. , Abubakar . H. (2016). Perception of Kogi State University Agricultural Students on Farming as a Career. International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Research, 3(4): 72-81. DOI: 10.18488/journal.70/2016.3.4/70.4.72.81
This study examined the perception of Kogi State University Agricultural Students on farming as a career. Primary data were collected using structured interview schedule to pick 150 students in the study area. Stratified random sampling technique was used to pick 30 students from each level (100-500). Data collected were analyzed using descriptive statistics such as frequency count, percentage and mean score on a 3 point likert-type of scale. The result of the study indicated that a large percentage (42.7%) of students were from household size of 4 to 6 which is fairly large for the needed labour force for agricultural activities. Many (56%) of the students had no farming experience before their enrolment into the university. The study further showed that most of the students had negative attitude when they resumed in 100 level mean score (X) (2.30) but are now greatly influenced by agricultural education impacted by trained agricultural experts (X) (2.67). Students Industrial Work Experience Scheme (SIWES) programme had also positively changed the students attitude to farming (2.25). Most respondents (X) (2.58) 86% showed willingness to engage in practical agricultural enterprise if supplied with the necessary agricultural inputs. Also willingness to embark on poultry farming had (X) (2.73), fish farming had ms (2.49), cash crop farming had (X) (2.19) and arable crop farming had (X) (2.12) which represented a popular perception among the respondents. Piggery farming with (X) (1.47) and beekeeping with (X) (1.33) had the least indication of interest by the students. Implementation of government agricultural policies that will ensure regular input and attractive market price could motivate agricultural graduates to embrace farming as a career.
Contribution/ Originality

Performance of Multi-Purpose Cooperatives in the Shiselweni Region of Swaziland

Pages: 58-71
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Performance of Multi-Purpose Cooperatives in the Shiselweni Region of Swaziland

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Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.70/2016.3.4/70.4.58.71

Citation: 1

T.A. Masuku , M.B. Masuku , J.P.B. Mutangira

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T.A. Masuku , M.B. Masuku , J.P.B. Mutangira (2016). Performance of Multi-Purpose Cooperatives in the Shiselweni Region of Swaziland. International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Research, 3(4): 58-71. DOI: 10.18488/journal.70/2016.3.4/70.4.58.71
A multi-purpose cooperative is a business that is a mixture of two or more different types of cooperatives. The study examined the performance of multi-purpose cooperatives in Swaziland. The objectives of the study were to; establish the performance of multi-purpose-cooperatives, identify factors influencing the performance of multi-purpose cooperatives, and identify constraints faced by multi-purpose cooperatives. A descriptive research design was used where quantitative and qualitative methods were employed to collect and analyse data. The target population was all registered and active multi-purpose cooperatives in the Shiselweni region. A sample (n=120) was drawn using a two-stage stratified random sampling procedure and it comprised of 80 cooperative members, 35 committee members and 5 cooperative officers who were purposely selected. Face to face personal interviews were used to collect the data. Data were analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 20). The study found that the performance of multi-purpose cooperatives was influenced by gender and accountability. The study further found that cooperative officers educated and trained cooperative members once a year. Major constraints included poor capital base, most members being too old to perform cooperative activities, and poor record-keeping. The study concluded that cooperatives were not performing well financially, since there were making losses. It is recommended that cooperatives should ensure the financial statements were prepared on time and audited. There is need to encourage young farmers to join multi-purpose cooperative since most of the farmers were old. The frequency of training provided to members need to be improved. The study also recommends that other studies be carried out to cover the whole of Swaziland in order to generalise the findings.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes to existing literature by analyzing the performance of multipurpose Cooperatives. The study not only established the performance of multi-purpose cooperatives, but also identified the factors affecting the performance of multi-purpose cooperatives, especially in Swaziland. The study used primary data, hence it is original.