International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Research

Published by: Conscientia Beam
Online ISSN: 2312-6477
Print ISSN: 2313-0393
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No. 1

The Evaluation of the Agriculture of Hazelhazelnut in Duzce According to Climate Parameters

Pages: 16-27
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The Evaluation of the Agriculture of Hazelhazelnut in Duzce According to Climate Parameters

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.70/2017.4.1/70.1.16.27

Mucahit COSKUN , Erol SOZEN

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Mucahit COSKUN , Erol SOZEN (2017). The Evaluation of the Agriculture of Hazelhazelnut in Duzce According to Climate Parameters. International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Research, 4(1): 16-27. DOI: 10.18488/journal.70/2017.4.1/70.1.16.27
Agriculture is a highly important economic activity in the world. Among the agricultural products of Turkey, hazelhazelnut is an important product for Turkey’s economy. More than 60 percent of the world hazelhazelnut production is made in Turkey. In this study, hazelhazelnut production in Düzce is examined in terms of possible climate effect in future. Because, Düzce is one of the important provinces in hazelhazelnut production. In th study, as a method, descriptive survey model has been used. In this method, existing situation on a subject is interpreted by searching. For this purpose, interpretation has been made by taking datum as to research from Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Livestock and Turkey Statistical Institute. These datum have been compared with weather data. In Düzce and in Turkey, hazelhazelnut production changing by years has been determined. It is seen that the largest factor to this is unexpected freeze and change of rainfall. It is reasoned that possible temperature increase in future and the effect of drought in Turkey and in Düzce that can effect agriculture of hazelhazelnut. Because, hazelhazelnut is selective and sensitive plant in terms of climate.

Contribution/ Originality
In the study, it has been evaluated hazelnut production of World and Turkey by comparing. Besides, in Düzce it has been contacted between hazelnut production and climate parameters. From this aspect, this study is the first in geography area.

Multi-Environment Variety Testing (Pre-Met) for Irrigated Ecosystem in Rice (Oryza Sativa L.)

Pages: 9-15
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Multi-Environment Variety Testing (Pre-Met) for Irrigated Ecosystem in Rice (Oryza Sativa L.)

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.70/2017.4.1/70.1.9.15

Md. Maksudul Haque , M Anisuzzaman , M.M. Emam Ahmed , Partha S Biswas , Md. Ansar Ali

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Md. Maksudul Haque , M Anisuzzaman , M.M. Emam Ahmed , Partha S Biswas , Md. Ansar Ali (2017). Multi-Environment Variety Testing (Pre-Met) for Irrigated Ecosystem in Rice (Oryza Sativa L.). International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Research, 4(1): 9-15. DOI: 10.18488/journal.70/2017.4.1/70.1.9.15
A set of 100 IRRI bred advanced breeding lines were tested at Gazipur (as moderate productive control site) and at Habiganj (as high productive site) following row-column design with 2 replications. The breeding lines were highly variable in days to maturity and plant height but not in grain yield. However the interaction effects between genotype and environment (GXE) were significant for all three traits. At Gazipur, the breeding lines yielded with range between 3.3 to 7.3 t/ha with a growth duration range of 138-154 days, while at Habiganj they yielded 5.1-7.9 t/ha with growth duration of 139-159 days. The highest yielding genotype was IR99092-B-B-78 followed by IR13A390, IR99061-B-B-7, IR14D111, etc at Gazipur, while IR13A390 followed by IR100008-91-B yielded the highest at Habiganj site. Based on yield and growth duration, 22 breeding lines showing better performance at Gazipur, 9 lines at Habiganj and 2 lines for both locations were selected for further evaluation.
Contribution/ Originality
Rice is the major staple food for more than half of the world’s population. The study therefore the breeding lines were highly variable in days to maturity and plant height but not in grain yield. However the interaction effects between genotype and environment (GXE) were significant for all three traits.

Reduction of the Carbon Footprint in Agricultural Greenhouses

Pages: 1-8
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Reduction of the Carbon Footprint in Agricultural Greenhouses

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.70/2017.4.1/70.1.1.8

John Vourdoubas

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John Vourdoubas (2017). Reduction of the Carbon Footprint in Agricultural Greenhouses. International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Research, 4(1): 1-8. DOI: 10.18488/journal.70/2017.4.1/70.1.1.8
Climate change in the planet is currently creating many environmental, economic and social problems which are probably going to multiply in the near future. Reduction of greenhouse gases emitted from fossil fuels could result in the mitigation of greenhouse effect and the climate change. Agricultural greenhouses consume large amounts of energy mainly derived from fossil fuels, for the cultivation of various crops. Reduction of their carbon footprint is of primary importance to day. In order to investigate the possibilities of reducing their carbon footprint, the energy consumption during their operation has been estimated and the sustainable energy technologies which could be used for substitution of fossil fuels used have been analyzed. It has been found that a modern greenhouse located in Mediterranean region with a covered area of 1,000 m2 and a total annual energy consumption of 200 KWh/m2 emits 76,900 kg CO2 per year. Total elimination of their CO2 emissions could be achieved with the investment of 44,000 € in renewable energy technologies, including solid biomass for heating and solar-PV for power generation and resulting in lower energy cost during their operation. The payback time of the abovementioned investments has been estimated at 4.84 years.
Contribution/ Originality
The study contributes in the existing literature regarding the improvement of the sustainability in agricultural greenhouses.  It indicates the possibility of using various renewable energy sources instead of fossil fuels for covering their energy requirements resulting in zeroing their CO2 emissions due to energy use in them.