Journal of Empirical Studies

Published by: Conscientia Beam
Online ISSN: 2312-6248
Print ISSN: 2312-623X
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No. 1

Can the Interdependence Effect and the Contagion Phenomena be Related with One Another?

Pages: 38-47
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Can the Interdependence Effect and the Contagion Phenomena be Related with One Another?

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Abdurrahman Korkmaz

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Abdurrahman Korkmaz (2014). Can the Interdependence Effect and the Contagion Phenomena be Related with One Another?. Journal of Empirical Studies, 1(1): 38-47. DOI:
This study suggests an alternative approach to the transmission process of financial crises across emerging economies. This paper hypothesizes that the interdependence effect could become weaker, disappears completely or swerves during the crisis period due to the contagion phenomenon. The hypothesis put forward in this paper is of great importance in terms of policy implications inasmuch as it is supported by the data for many cases.
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Taylor Rule in The Context of Inflation Targeting: The Case of Tunisia

Pages: 30-37
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Taylor Rule in The Context of Inflation Targeting: The Case of Tunisia

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Kaouther Amiri , Besma Talbi

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  1. Debelle, G., 1997. Inflation targeting in practice. IMF WP/97/53 Washington DC.
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  4. Mishkin, F., 2001. Issues in inflation targeting, in price stability and the long-run target for monetary policy. Ottawa, Canada: Bank of Canada.
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Kaouther Amiri , Besma Talbi (2014). Taylor Rule in The Context of Inflation Targeting: The Case of Tunisia. Journal of Empirical Studies, 1(1): 30-37. DOI:
The aim of this paper is to determine the optimal Taylor-type rule and the appropriate variables for the Tunisian economy in its conduct of the economic policy. Our starting point is the traditional Taylor rule. The results of the estimation of the reaction function in its static version confirm the hypothesis that Tunisia has been leading an efficient policy to control its inflation. Based on Akaike and Schwarz criteria, the results indicate that the static model better represents the reaction function of the Reserve Bank of Tunisia.
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Development of Logarithmic Equations for Statistical Sample Determination

Pages: 23-29
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Development of Logarithmic Equations for Statistical Sample Determination

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Citation: 2

Moayad B. Zaied , Ahmed M. El Naim , Dafalla M. Mekki

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Moayad B. Zaied , Ahmed M. El Naim , Dafalla M. Mekki (2014). Development of Logarithmic Equations for Statistical Sample Determination. Journal of Empirical Studies, 1(1): 23-29. DOI:
Sample size estimation is a fundamental step in designing trials and studies for which the primary objective is the estimation or the comparison of parameters. In this paper, the equation of sample for proportion was used to develop two equations for sample size determination. The resultant equations are natural and normal logarithmic. The validation test was conducted for populations with different sizes from 10 to 100000 from which sample size was calculated applying the equation of sample for proportion, finite population correction for proportion equation and the developed equations at 0.05 and 0.01 levels of significance. It was found that the sample size calculated by natural logarithmic equation was larger than sample sizes calculated by proportion, finite population correction for proportion, and normal logarithmic equation. Sample size calculated by normal logarithmic equation was the smallest up to 1000 population size at 0.05 level of significance and up to 10000 population sizes at 0.01 levels.
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Relationships Between Leadership Roles and Project Team Effectiveness as Perceived by Project Managers in Malaysia

Pages: 1-22
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Relationships Between Leadership Roles and Project Team Effectiveness as Perceived by Project Managers in Malaysia

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Citation: 8

Han-Ping Fung

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Han-Ping Fung (2014). Relationships Between Leadership Roles and Project Team Effectiveness as Perceived by Project Managers in Malaysia. Journal of Empirical Studies, 1(1): 1-22. DOI:
 Today, more and more project teams are formed to achieve organizational objectives as organizations generally recognized the importance and benefits of project teams.  However, in order to ensure project teams perform effectively, project managers need to learn and exhibit some of the leadership roles proposed by Quinn (1988) as these roles can impact the project team effectiveness.  The current study developed a research model underpinned on Cohen and Bailey (1997) team effectiveness framework, Quinn (1988) leadership roles and Hoevemeyer (1993) five criteria of project team effectiveness.  Based on a sample of 201 project managers, an empirical study had confirmed that a project manager’s leadership roles like mentor, facilitator, innovator and coordinator are important in influencing four out of five criteria of project team effectiveness which include team mission, goal achievement, empowerment, open and honest communication.

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