International Journal of Education and Practice

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No. 3

Investigating Employment and Career Decision of Health Sciences Teachers in the Rural School Districts and Communities: A Social Cognitive Career Approach

Pages: 294-309
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Investigating Employment and Career Decision of Health Sciences Teachers in the Rural School Districts and Communities: A Social Cognitive Career Approach

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.294.309

Dos Santos Luis Miguel

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Dos Santos Luis Miguel (2019). Investigating Employment and Career Decision of Health Sciences Teachers in the Rural School Districts and Communities: A Social Cognitive Career Approach. International Journal of Education and Practice, 7(3): 294-309. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.294.309
Teachers’ shortage in the field of K-12 teaching in general and health subjects teaching in particular is one of the most significant challenges in both developed and developing countries, particularly in rural school districts and communities. Leaders at rural school districts strive to establish connections and plans to recruit experienced health educators from different sources and satisfy the on-going manpower demands in rural areas. This study examined two premises: First, why health professionals and staff from urban regions decide to change their career to health science teaching in rural communities and school districts. Second, how to recruit and retain health professionals and staff to rural communities and school districts. The Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis model was employed to explore the beliefs of 11 health professionals in the rural school district. Stable employment, money sources, and understanding of teaching mission of health science education were three major areas of study. The findings of this study would serve as a blueprint for rural communities and school districts to attract potential health professionals and staff into the current education system.
Contribution/ Originality
This study investigated the reasons why frontline health professionals decide to switch their career to health sciences teaching in rural communities based on Social Cognitive Career Theory. It contributes to the existing literature on teachers’ education programmes, rural school workforce, and second-career teachers in the field of health education.

Investigating Effectiveness of Disability Friendly Education Training Modules in Indonesian Schools

Pages: 286-293
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Investigating Effectiveness of Disability Friendly Education Training Modules in Indonesian Schools

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.286.293

Abdul Salim , M. Furqon Hidayatullah , Permata Primadhita Nugraheni , Dian Atnantomi W

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Abdul Salim , M. Furqon Hidayatullah , Permata Primadhita Nugraheni , Dian Atnantomi W (2019). Investigating Effectiveness of Disability Friendly Education Training Modules in Indonesian Schools. International Journal of Education and Practice, 7(3): 286-293. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.286.293
This study aimed to determine the effect of disability friendly education training on teachers’ understanding by applying disability-friendly education training modules. The research design adopted the pre-posttest method given to the same group before and after training on imparting disability friendly education. Classroom teachers in inclusive schools under the Ministry of Religion in Surakarta were the subjects of this research. The validity of the instrument was tested by using content validity on the feasibility or relevance of the contents of the test instrument through rational analysis by expert judgment. The results showed that the paired sample T-Test score was -17.736 with significant level at 0.000, which means <0.05. It suggests that there is a significant difference in the score of the average teacher's understanding of disability-friendly education before and after training, and the difference is statistically significant too. It can therefore be concluded that disability friendly educational training is effective to improve teachers' understanding in public schools.
Contribution/ Originality
The primary contribution of this research is to find out whether training modules can prove effective in developing understanding among teachers of public school about persons with disabilities. This study is unique in proving that training intervention can make schools become disability-friendly schools for persons with disabilities.

Forecasting the Results of Students Attending School in Vietnam by Geographical Area

Pages: 274-285
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Forecasting the Results of Students Attending School in Vietnam by Geographical Area

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.274.285

Son Huynh Van , Hong Nguyen Thi Minh , Khuong Nguyen Vinh , Loc Sam Vinh , Vu Giang Thien

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Son Huynh Van , Hong Nguyen Thi Minh , Khuong Nguyen Vinh , Loc Sam Vinh , Vu Giang Thien (2019). Forecasting the Results of Students Attending School in Vietnam by Geographical Area. International Journal of Education and Practice, 7(3): 274-285. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.274.285
This study attempts to forecast the results of school students in Vietnam by geographical region analysis. Results show variations between regions. In the Red River Delta region, it is forecast that in the decade 2015 to 2025, the number of children attending to school will increase slightly. In the Midlands and Northern Mountains region, the average number of children attending school should increase gradually by 2.4 percent over five years. In the North Central and Central Coast regions, student numbers have increased and decreased erratically. In the Central Highlands, there has been an average rate increase of 3.45 percent over five years. In the Southeast region, student numbers at all levels are expected to increase by an average of 3.9 per cent over five years. In the Mekong Delta region, student numbers are expected to increase by one percent over five years but experience a 1.8 percent reduction by 2035. These data will be critical to planning for the education sector in the coming decades.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes to the existing literature by use of a new estimation methodology for analyzing and comparing student numbers at each education level within an appropriate time-frame.

Conceptual Understanding, Procedural Knowledge and Problem-Solving Skills in Mathematics: High School Graduates Work Analysis and Standpoints

Pages: 258-273
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Conceptual Understanding, Procedural Knowledge and Problem-Solving Skills in Mathematics: High School Graduates Work Analysis and Standpoints

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.258.273

Masooma Ali Al-Mutawah , Ruby Thomas , Abdulla Eid , Enaz Yousef Mahmoud , Moosa Jaafar Fateel

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Masooma Ali Al-Mutawah , Ruby Thomas , Abdulla Eid , Enaz Yousef Mahmoud , Moosa Jaafar Fateel (2019). Conceptual Understanding, Procedural Knowledge and Problem-Solving Skills in Mathematics: High School Graduates Work Analysis and Standpoints. International Journal of Education and Practice, 7(3): 258-273. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.258.273
This study measures the mathematical abilities high school graduates’ in Bahrain. Mathematical abilities encompass conceptual understanding, procedural knowledge and problem-solving skills in the five content domains which are Number and Operations, Algebra, Geometry, Measurement, and Data Analysis and Probability. While procedural understanding focusses on performing facts and algorithms, conceptual understanding reflects a student's ability to reason and comprehend mathematical concepts, operations and relations which will be helpful in solving non-routine problems. A test consisting of questions from the five content domains was administered to students where they demonstrated conceptual understanding and procedural knowledge which enabled them to solve problems in various real-life situations. Structured interviews were also conducted to test their mathematical abilities and suggest ways to improve proficiency in mathematics and eliminate misconceptions. The results show that conceptual understanding and problem-solving skills are positively correlated. This research also endeavors to correlate students’ performance in this test with their high school GPA.
Contribution/ Originality
This study explores the relationship between mathematical abilities: conceptual understanding, procedural knowledge and problem-solving skills in high school graduates in the five mathematics content domains: number and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and data analysis and probability.

Effectiveness of Gamification of Web-Based Learning in Improving Academic Achievement and Creative Thinking among Primary School Students

Pages: 242-257
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Effectiveness of Gamification of Web-Based Learning in Improving Academic Achievement and Creative Thinking among Primary School Students

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.242.257

Seham Aljraiwi

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Seham Aljraiwi (2019). Effectiveness of Gamification of Web-Based Learning in Improving Academic Achievement and Creative Thinking among Primary School Students. International Journal of Education and Practice, 7(3): 242-257. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.242.257
Gamification is one of the most significant modern trends in educational technology. The present study aims to identify the effectiveness of gamification of web-based learning on academic achievement and creative thinking among primary school students. A learning environment was designed based on gamification of web-based learning. A quasi-experimental approach was utilized to identify the effect of the independent variable, gamification, on the dependent variables, academic achievement and creative thinking among participants. An academic achievement test and the Torrance test of creative thinking were applied to the participants. Results revealed that there was a statistically significant difference between the means of scores of the experimental and control groups in the post-test academic achievement test and the Torrance test of creative thinking in favor of the experimental group. This suggests a high level of academic achievement and creative thinking after using gamification. The study recommends training in-service teachers in the use of gamification for web-based teaching of English.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes to the existing literature that deals with gamification and the possibility of employing it to improve student academic achievement. It also tackles its effectiveness in improving student creative thinking, a subject that very few studies have covered.

Out-of-Field Social Studies Teaching through Sustainable Culture-Based Pedagogy: A Filipino Perspective

Pages: 230-241
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Out-of-Field Social Studies Teaching through Sustainable Culture-Based Pedagogy: A Filipino Perspective

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.230.241

Nina Mea S. Pacana , Charmen D. Ramos , Maryland N. Catarata , Reynaldo B. Inocian

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Nina Mea S. Pacana , Charmen D. Ramos , Maryland N. Catarata , Reynaldo B. Inocian (2019). Out-of-Field Social Studies Teaching through Sustainable Culture-Based Pedagogy: A Filipino Perspective. International Journal of Education and Practice, 7(3): 230-241. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.230.241
Quality of the instructional process is at stake when taught by out-of-field teachers. The current study identified the problems met by such teachers who teach across their specialization in the teaching of social studies. These Out-of-field social studies teachers encounter several issues in the preparation and administration of their lessons. This study first identified this specialization-workload mismatch and investigated what coping mechanisms can be introduced for the survival of these teachers in and out-of-field-teaching environment. The study employed a qualitative phenomenological research methodology and conducted an in-depth interview using open-ended questions, in order to generate the eidetic insights of the issues. Ethical considerations were administered to protect the confidentiality of the research participants. The data collected were translated and analyzed, resulting in the unveiling of themes and concepts from the narratives of the research participants. In the light of these findings, a Heideggerian interpretive analysis catapulted the creation of a Culture-based BAYLE Teaching Model (BTM) for that could be a solution to the out-of-field teaching individuals. The study recommends the introduction of BTM in all schools facing out-of-field issues.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes a pioneering mechanism in responding to the problem of out-of-field social studies teaching in the workplace using Heidggerian interpretivism. This study recommends crafting of a culture-based model of innovative instructional delivery known as the Bayle Teaching Model–a legacy of the Philippines to cultural global education.

Impact of Social Media on Social Value Systems among University Students in Saudi Arabia

Pages: 216-229
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Impact of Social Media on Social Value Systems among University Students in Saudi Arabia

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.216.229

Hanan A. Aljehani

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Hanan A. Aljehani (2019). Impact of Social Media on Social Value Systems among University Students in Saudi Arabia. International Journal of Education and Practice, 7(3): 216-229. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.216.229
The present study aims to investigate the impact of social media on the value system (especially citizenship, time respect, others' privacy respect, family communication, and communication values) among the students of the College of Education, Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University. It utilized the descriptive approach and applied a 40-item questionnaire covering (5) domains to a randomly selected sample of (142) students. Results revealed a positive impact of social media on citizenship and communication values, a moderately negative impact on time respect, and a poor impact on others' privacy respect and on family communication. There were no statistically significant differences in the impact of social media on the value system due to (specialization, family's economic status, time spent on social media, and preferred social media). The study results call for benefiting from the positive impacts of social media and sensitizing students to the negative ones, especially time respect and its optimal use, as well as conducting qualitative studies on the reasons for spending too much time on social media.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes to the existing literature by identifying the impact of social media on the value system among the students of the College of Education, Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University, Saudi Arabia. It explores the impact of social media on student values e.g. citizenship, time respect, others' privacy respect, social communication, family communication, and communication values.

Initiatives for Accomplishing the TIMSS 500 CenterPoint through Curricula, Teachers' Development and Instructional Strategies

Pages: 200-215
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Initiatives for Accomplishing the TIMSS 500 CenterPoint through Curricula, Teachers' Development and Instructional Strategies

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.200.215

Masooma Ali Al-Mutawah , Ruby Thomas , Abdulghani Al-Hattami , Nisha Preji , Maha Al-Enizi

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Masooma Ali Al-Mutawah , Ruby Thomas , Abdulghani Al-Hattami , Nisha Preji , Maha Al-Enizi (2019). Initiatives for Accomplishing the TIMSS 500 CenterPoint through Curricula, Teachers' Development and Instructional Strategies. International Journal of Education and Practice, 7(3): 200-215. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.200.215
The Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) is one of the most influential assessments of student achievement conducted every four years. It provides reliable data on mathematics and science achievements in grade 4 and grade 8 as well as information about instructional curricular and teaching-learning process. This helps to make decisions on policy development and identify areas of progress. This research delivers evidence on factors that influence the improvement in the scores of TIMSS examination in 2015 compared to 2011 in the Kingdom of Bahrain. Since the Kingdom experienced a major reformation in mathematics and science education, this research analyzes the improvement in students’ skills and knowledge by comparing the same cohort results in 2011 and 2015 in mathematics as well as science. This research is also trying to identify other factors, as benchmarked by the Bahrain Numeracy Strategy (BNS) such as school environment, teacher education, teacher’s professional development, and classroom contexts for learning and instructional support which backed the improvement. This research provides initiatives to be taken to accomplish TIMSS Center Point 500 in the coming TIMSS examination in 2019 or later.
Contribution/ Originality
This research provides initiatives to be taken to cross TIMSS Center Point 500 in the coming TIMSS examinations in the Kingdom of Bahrain by analyzing the factors such as curriculum development, instructional strategies, school infrastructure, teacher’s education and professional development, classroom contexts for developing a learning environment.

Examining the Implications of Differentiated Instruction for High School Students’ Self-Actualization

Pages: 184-199
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Examining the Implications of Differentiated Instruction for High School Students’ Self-Actualization

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.184.199

Afaf Aljaser

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Afaf Aljaser (2019). Examining the Implications of Differentiated Instruction for High School Students’ Self-Actualization. International Journal of Education and Practice, 7(3): 184-199. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.184.199
Adopting differentiated teaching and learning strategies has proved effective in addressing students’ diverse capabilities and potentials as well as developing their skills. This study examines the implications of differentiated instruction for self-actualization among high school students. For achieving this purpose, the quasi-experimental approach was adopted. The sample consisted of (58) high school students from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. They were subdivided into an experimental group comprising (28) students taught in a differentiated classroom environment and a control one comprising (30) students taught in a traditional classroom environment. Two scales, a differentiated classroom environment scale and a self-actualization scale, were prepared and applied upon the participants. The results showed a high level of self-actualization among the experimental group students, indicating that differentiated instruction improved their self-actualization skills. Differentiated instruction provided students with an environment suitable to make them feel self-confident, establish positive relations with their classmates, and positively interact and cooperate with them. In the light of these results, the author recommends holding training courses and workshops to qualify teachers for designing and utilizing differentiated instruction.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies, which have investigated the implications of differentiated instruction for self-actualization. It enriches the existing literature of learner-centered education since it aims at considering learners’ individual differences and self-actualization skills. Studying the implication of differentiated instruction for self-actualization has a promising significance.

Financial Literacy of Telebachillerato Students: A Study of Perception, Usefulness and Application of Financial Tools

Pages: 168-183
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Financial Literacy of Telebachillerato Students: A Study of Perception, Usefulness and Application of Financial Tools

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.168.183

Elena Moreno-Garcia , Arturo Garcia-Santillan , Aracely De los Santos Gutierrez

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Elena Moreno-Garcia , Arturo Garcia-Santillan , Aracely De los Santos Gutierrez (2019). Financial Literacy of Telebachillerato Students: A Study of Perception, Usefulness and Application of Financial Tools. International Journal of Education and Practice, 7(3): 168-183. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.168.183
The aim of this empirical study is to explain how students of a Telebachillerato in Veracruz, Mexico perceive financial variables like income, money management, savings, investment, spending and credit. Telebachilleratos are high schools for rural communities in Mexico assisted by educational audiovisual support and two or three teachers to explain material to students. Hence, the hypothesis raises the existence of a factorial structure that underlies and that allows to explain the perception and knowledge of students towards these financial topics. For this empirical study, the Financial Education Test by Contreras-Rodríguez et al. (2017) was used, which presented an internal consistency of ? = 0.859, and was applied upon 368 students enrolled in different semesters of a school year. The data were analyzed by exploratory factor analysis with the criterion of extraction of main components. The findings show a favorable perception towards the variables that were analyzed. There is significant evidence in the “income” variable, for instance, about the clear conviction of students that study and training constitute a bridge that will help them earn a good income when they enter into a job. In addition, it was also perceived that extracurricular courses were another potential source to improve their income.
Contribution/ Originality
This research is one of the few that have explored the Telebachillerato students, who belong to a vulnerable socioeconomic sector of Mexico. This study analyzes the perception of this population segment towards financial tools to ascertain allows to appreciate that educate in financial topics to these young people can not only improve their economic condition but motivate them to keep studying.

Shifting Primary School Teachers Understanding of Songs Teaching Methods : An Action Research Study in Indonesia

Pages: 158-167
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Shifting Primary School Teachers Understanding of Songs Teaching Methods : An Action Research Study in Indonesia

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.158.167

J. Julia , Arif Hakim , Afi Fadlilah

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J. Julia , Arif Hakim , Afi Fadlilah (2019). Shifting Primary School Teachers Understanding of Songs Teaching Methods : An Action Research Study in Indonesia. International Journal of Education and Practice, 7(3): 158-167. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.158.167
In order to teach songs properly, primary school teachers need to be equipped with various strategies in songs teaching, and develop an understanding about correct methods of songs teaching. These primary school teachers teach songs through traditional oral methods with their own voices as the role model, though they did not have a perfect pitch. This research aims at rectifying primary school teachers’ understanding of their own teaching methods in vocal teaching. This research exemplifies the results of a collaborative teamwork for critical units in order to change primary school teachers’ understanding on teaching songs to their students. The result of these units show that by providing information about the impact of teaching songs to their prospective students who sang with poor singing skills and did not have a good pitch, it is possible to change teachers’ understanding of teaching songs by using modern teaching methods. Moreover, guiding teachers to use various applications and media in teaching songs would provide new insight into them to choose supporting devices, and improve teaching literacy for vocal teaching.
Contribution/ Originality
The paper's primary contribution is finding why primary school teachers possess a wrong understanding of songs teaching methods for their students, which results in poor teaching performance. Through an action research approach, this research is trying to pioneer that a technology and media assisted methodology can change their understanding and result in better teaching performance.

Pre-Service Teachers Professional Development through Four-Step Problem-Solving Model: A Seminar Method

Pages: 146-157
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Pre-Service Teachers Professional Development through Four-Step Problem-Solving Model: A Seminar Method

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.146.157

Luis Miguel Dos Santos

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Luis Miguel Dos Santos (2019). Pre-Service Teachers Professional Development through Four-Step Problem-Solving Model: A Seminar Method. International Journal of Education and Practice, 7(3): 146-157. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.146.157
Effective teaching and learning strategy is one of the most important topics in the field of teachers’ professional development. Teachers’ education and pre-service teachers’ training programmes provide necessary coursework, field experience, and student teaching internship experience to pre-service, potential, and second career teachers who are seeking initial license status. Due to the rapid developments in Hong Kong, China, school teachers face challenges, difficulties, and social problems due to excess enrolment of teachers from different backgrounds. The regular curriculum and material also fail to cover all these issues. The current study applied the seminar technique as recommended in Polya’s Four-Step Problem-Solving Model with targeted discussion topics and engaged 12 STEM pre-service teachers at one of the Postgraduate Diploma in Education (PGDE) programmes. The results indicated that beyond regular coursework, field experience, and internship experiences embedded in the curriculum, additional seminars allowed the participants to establish inter-disciplinary teaching strategies and critical thinking skills. The results of this study serve as a blueprint for teachers’ education programme leaders and school administrators to establish similar seminars and conduct such sessions for their pre-service and in-service teachers to refresh and advance their teaching and learning strategies.
Contribution/ Originality
The study contributes to the existing literature on teachers’ education programmes, teachers’ training, and teachers’ professional development. The primary contribution of this article is also to provide directions for school leaders and administrators to establish professional training to their in-service and pre-service teachers in K-12 school environments.

Understanding the Impact of Determinants in Game Learning Acceptance: An Empirical Study

Pages: 136-145
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Understanding the Impact of Determinants in Game Learning Acceptance: An Empirical Study

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.136.145

Untung Rahardja , Taqwa Hariguna , Qurotul Aini

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Untung Rahardja , Taqwa Hariguna , Qurotul Aini (2019). Understanding the Impact of Determinants in Game Learning Acceptance: An Empirical Study. International Journal of Education and Practice, 7(3): 136-145. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.136.145
This study aimed to integrate Innovation Diffusion Theory (IDT) and Expectation Confirmation Model (ECM) on user intention of game learning. This study framed 10 hypotheses to investigate the objectives of this study. The results of 8 hypotheses were positive and had a significant impact on students’ behavior in the use of game learning. The method used in this research was empirical, with 164 valid respondents. The results found in this research was students’ continued intention in the use of game learning (CI), which was directly influenced by student perceived usefulness (PU), student satisfaction (SAT) and student habitual (HAB) while student satisfaction (SAT) was influenced by student perceived usefulness (PU) and triability (TRA). In addition, the findings of this research were predicted to offer useful validation from the antecedents involved in the process of deciding the user continuous intention in game learning. This research also provided a theoretical framework and understanding of the field of user behavior intention for academia and practitioners, who will benefit from the findings of this study and develop applications/software for a more adequate and competent game learning.
Contribution/ Originality
This study aimed to integrate IDT and ECM on user’s intention of game learning. It assessed the impact of various theoretical determinants on customer’s delight and continuous intentions of use of game learning and identified processes that made influences on them. Unlike the previous research which assessed ECM and IDT separately, this study has combined the two models in the context of game learning.

Developing ICT Competences in Bachelors of Engineering and Technology in a Multilingual Environment

Pages: 123-135
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Developing ICT Competences in Bachelors of Engineering and Technology in a Multilingual Environment

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.123.135

Raushan Sailauovna Kuanysheva , Almagul Zhayakovna Asainova , Marina Ivanovna Ragulina , Mikhail Pavlovich Lapchik

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Raushan Sailauovna Kuanysheva , Almagul Zhayakovna Asainova , Marina Ivanovna Ragulina , Mikhail Pavlovich Lapchik (2019). Developing ICT Competences in Bachelors of Engineering and Technology in a Multilingual Environment. International Journal of Education and Practice, 7(3): 123-135. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.123.135
While the Republic of Kazakhstan is integrating into a global educational space, the information and communication (I&C) competence of technical personnel becomes vital. This trend is connected with the rapid development of information and communication technologies. Based on the analysis of literary sources and the conducted empirical study, the authors present and substantiate the structure of I&C competences of Bachelors in Engineering and Technology in the Republic of Kazakhstan, including user activity, substantive work, drawing-and-designing and experimental-research components. In this research, the authors aim to determine the level of I&C competences and analyze the data obtained during the experiment. The study used a specially designed questionnaire to investigate the distinctive features of user activity of future engineers and to identify the extent of their use of I&C technologies in the subject, design, experimental and research activities during university studies. The authors have successfully formed the structure of I&C competences in various fields of application. The experiment has demonstrated that currently, most students have an average level of I & C technologies competences. The development of I&C competences in the conditions of multilingualism will effectively influence the quality of professional training of future engineers.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is first of its kind to examine the requirements of information and communication competences of future graduates in engineering and technology in the context of a multilingual environment. The study shows that a majority of future engineering graduates lack I&C competence required for working in a multilingual environment. The study recommends that an internship can serve as an effective form of raising the level of I &C competence.

Do Teachers Attitudes, Perception of Usefulness, and Perceived Social Influences Predict their Behavioral Intentions to Use Gamification in EFL Classrooms? Evidence from the Middle East

Pages: 112-122
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Do Teachers Attitudes, Perception of Usefulness, and Perceived Social Influences Predict their Behavioral Intentions to Use Gamification in EFL Classrooms? Evidence from the Middle East

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.112.122

Mohammed J. Asiri

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Mohammed J. Asiri (2019). Do Teachers Attitudes, Perception of Usefulness, and Perceived Social Influences Predict their Behavioral Intentions to Use Gamification in EFL Classrooms? Evidence from the Middle East. International Journal of Education and Practice, 7(3): 112-122. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2019.73.112.122
To motivate learners, teachers of English as a foreign language (EFL) are encouraged to use gaming elements, which can stimulate students take a more active role in the learning process. There are many free and informal online applications now available to support this model, but not all EFL teachers, particularly female ones, are inclined to introduce gamification. Three essential variables that may influence their behavioral intentions to use gamified applications are attitude, perceived usefulness, and perceived social influence, which this study aims to investigate. This is a quantitative study based on a sample of 157 female EFL teachers. The data was collected through a questionnaire, the results of which indicate that attitude, perceived usefulness, and perceived social influence are significant predictors of teachers’ behavioral intentions to use gamification.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of only a few that has investigated the factors influencing female teachers’ behavioral intentions to use gamified applications in Saudi schools. It contributes to the existing body of literature by providing empirical evidence on how the expectations of those around us, together with our attitudes and perceived usefulness, affect our decisions.