International Journal of Education and Practice

Published by: Conscien
Online ISSN: 2310-3868
Print ISSN: 2311-6897
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No. 1

Teacher CPD across Borders: Reflections on How a Study Tour to England Helped to Change Practice and Praxis among Jamaican Teachers

Pages: 9-20
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Teacher CPD across Borders: Reflections on How a Study Tour to England Helped to Change Practice and Praxis among Jamaican Teachers

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2014.2.1/61.1.9.20

Citation: 6

Paul Miller , Ian Potter

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Paul Miller , Ian Potter (2014). Teacher CPD across Borders: Reflections on How a Study Tour to England Helped to Change Practice and Praxis among Jamaican Teachers. International Journal of Education and Practice, 2(1): 9-20. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2014.2.1/61.1.9.20
The professional development of teachers and school leaders is an important factor in improving the overall quality and effectiveness of schools. Teachers and Principals who are well trained and who have exposure to different educational systems are in a position to draw on their experiences of other systems to improve outcomes for their classrooms, staffrooms and institutions as a whole.  Reflecting on our own experiences of organising and delivering a Study Tour, we also present the experiences of Jamaican public educators on a recent Study Tour to England. From their feedback, it is clear that this experiential approach to capacity building has gone some way in stimulating participants’ thinking as regards their practice and how this can be improved, underpinned by Hargreaves and Fullan’s (2012) notion of reconceptualising professional capital and Mintzberg (2004) view of global mindsets.

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Responsibility Formation in Medical Students in the Course of Foreign Language Study

Pages: 1-8
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Responsibility Formation in Medical Students in the Course of Foreign Language Study

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2014.2.1/61.1.1.8

Citation: 1

Oksana Isayeva

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Oksana Isayeva (2014). Responsibility Formation in Medical Students in the Course of Foreign Language Study. International Journal of Education and Practice, 2(1): 1-8. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2014.2.1/61.1.1.8
In Ukraine formation of responsibility is a teaching paradigm in the process of studying foreign languages at higher medical educational institutions. The task of humanitarian disciplines at the medical universities is to help medical students develop self-discipline and to become better students, self-motivated learners and constructive members of society. Culture, humanization of the pedagogical process, personality-oriented education and personal qualities development are considered to be the most important aspects in humanistic education. Formation of responsibility at the English lessons is a group management. Theoretical material should be fruitful and thought-provoking, giving rare opportunity to spend time on reflecting and discussing as well as on learning. All tasks used in the process of foreign languages study should be communication-oriented and adjust students to the correct interpretation of the problematic situation that requires mental stress and stimulates the activity of students’ speech in the discussion of real-world facts. Teaching English through words and actions can help transfer solid character principles such as personal, social and moral responsibility to students in a long-lasting manner. Personal responsibility is an obligation to medical students and their future profession. Thus, teachers are to assist medical students to be seekers of responsibility and truth, and often these mean demonstrating varying opinions to find the one most suitable for presentation. Qualities of health care specialist should include responsibility, respect, humility, courage and willingness. The main humanistic values comprise mutual communication and understanding, spiritual, moral and physical health developing in the process of teaching English. A teacher must be competent, creative and know how to motivate a medical student properly trying to improve the environment in which personality of health care system is formed.

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