Journal of Food Technology Research

Published by: Conscientia Beam
Online ISSN: 2312-3796
Print ISSN: 2312-6426
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No. 2

The Evaluation of Some Dietary Fiber Rich by-Products in Ice Creams Made from the Traditional Pudding - Kesme Muhallebi

Pages: 105-109
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The Evaluation of Some Dietary Fiber Rich by-Products in Ice Creams Made from the Traditional Pudding - Kesme Muhallebi

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.58/2016.3.2/58.2.105.109

Hatice SICRAMAZ , Ahmet AYAR , Eda Nur AYAR

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Hatice SICRAMAZ , Ahmet AYAR , Eda Nur AYAR (2016). The Evaluation of Some Dietary Fiber Rich by-Products in Ice Creams Made from the Traditional Pudding - Kesme Muhallebi. Journal of Food Technology Research, 3(2): 105-109. DOI: 10.18488/journal.58/2016.3.2/58.2.105.109
The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary fiber (DF)-rich by-products in Turkish traditional pudding kesme muhallebi and ice cream made from it. For this purpose, corn pulp, black carrot and apricot pomace were added in dessert samples. Dessert and ice cream samples were analyzed for their sensory attributes and textural properties. Black carrot pomace added samples had the lowest sensory attributes, while corn pulp added samples had comparable results with control samples. The obtained results in this study showed that the sensory properties of the desserts weren’t affected adversely with the addition of DF materials except for black carrot. Some of the food industry wastes can be available processing aids in functional food production. In addition, kesme muhallebi dessert was successfully introduced into ice cream, with higher sensorial attributes. 
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the existing literature of dietary fiber rich by-products from food processing as a source of functional materials that can be evaluated in dairy products.

Design of Experiment - Optimization of HPLC Analysis of Vitamin A and E in Margarine and Vegetable Oil

Pages: 99-104
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Design of Experiment - Optimization of HPLC Analysis of Vitamin A and E in Margarine and Vegetable Oil

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.58/2016.3.2/58.2.99.104

Citation: 2

Lorinc Garai

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Lorinc Garai (2016). Design of Experiment - Optimization of HPLC Analysis of Vitamin A and E in Margarine and Vegetable Oil. Journal of Food Technology Research, 3(2): 99-104. DOI: 10.18488/journal.58/2016.3.2/58.2.99.104
Liquid chromatography is a useful method for selective analysis of vitamin A and E. The native components can be easily tested due to their UV-absorbance and beneficial separation characteristics. To test the food sample, vitamin A and E have to be separated from the fatty part of food. This step is performed by saponification, which is the critical step of procedure due to the heat and light sensitivity of both vitamins. The corresponding standards (MSZ-EN 12822-1, MSZ EN 12823-1) recommend a wide range of saponification temperature and time, giving an opportunity to optimize the recovery of the analyte. Experimental tests were performed from vegetable oil and margarine sample to find the temperature and time settings for the best recovery. Both factors were examined with centered two-level factorial design. Data analysis showed an increasing recovery of analytes towards the corner points of highest possible temperature and shortest possible saponification time. Finally, confirmatory tests were made.
Contribution/ Originality

Mobile Food Consumption Monitoring Application

Pages: 88-98
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Mobile Food Consumption Monitoring Application

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.58/2016.3.2/58.2.88.98

Negin Hamzeheinejad , Hannyzzura Pal @ Affal

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  1. Geok, S.K., A. Yusof, S.K. Lam, S. Japar, O.S. Leong and M.S.O. Fauzee, 2015. Physical activity and health-promoting lifestyle of student nurses in Malaysia. Journal of Biosciences and Medicines, 3(03): 78.
  2. Kasim, S. and F.A. Zakaria, 2013. Daily calorie manager for basic daily use. In Innovative Computing Technology (INTECH), 2013 Third International Conference on. IEEE. pp: 437-442.
  3. Ministry of Health Malaysia, 2016. National Health and Morbidity Survey (NHMS) 2015. Retrieved from http://www.iku.gov.my/images/IKU/Document/REPORT/2015/PressMeetYBMKNHMS2015.pdf.
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Negin Hamzeheinejad , Hannyzzura Pal @ Affal (2016). Mobile Food Consumption Monitoring Application. Journal of Food Technology Research, 3(2): 88-98. DOI: 10.18488/journal.58/2016.3.2/58.2.88.98
Obesity is becoming a serious health issue due to the growing number of obese people in many countries. iFood, a mobile application to help individuals manage daily calorie consumption is presented and ways of optimizing the daily calorie needed is achieved by offering information of each food and suggestions on food and physical activities that can be carried out to balance the amount of calorie intake. The application is developed based on the Rational Unified Process Model (RUP) system development methodology which comprises of four stages including inception, elaboration, construction and transition. We present the design, implementation and evaluation of iFood for Android smartphones and demonstrate its feasibility in monitoring daily calorie intake. The application analyzes emphasizing on its accessibility and acceptance test. The results show that participants are satisfied with the features provided by the application. They agreed that the application helps them to monitor their food intakes and hence to lose weight.
Contribution/ Originality
This study investigates on obesity in Malaysia and it proposes mobile food application which is useful for people to monitor their food intakes. Furthermore, features of this application will be explained in the paper.

Effect of Jameed Form on the Chemical Composition, Rheological and Microbial Properties

Pages: 72-87
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Effect of Jameed Form on the Chemical Composition, Rheological and Microbial Properties

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.58/2016.3.2/58.2.72.87

Mohamed N. F. Hamad , Magdy M. Ismail , Reham K. A. El-Menawy

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Mohamed N. F. Hamad , Magdy M. Ismail , Reham K. A. El-Menawy (2016). Effect of Jameed Form on the Chemical Composition, Rheological and Microbial Properties. Journal of Food Technology Research, 3(2): 72-87. DOI: 10.18488/journal.58/2016.3.2/58.2.72.87
Nine treatments to study the effect of jameed form (triangle, square and cylinder molds) on the chemical composition, rheological and microbial properties. The treatments were made as follow: (A) sheep buttermilk (control) with ball form, (B) goat skim milk with ball form, (C) goat skim milk with triangle form, (D) goat skim milk with square form, (E) goat skim milk with cylinder form, (F) cow skim milk with ball form, (G) cow skim milk with triangle form, (H) cow skim milk with square and (I) cow skim milk with cylinder form. Yield of cylindrical shape were slightly higher, while levels of ball, triangle and square forms were close to each other. The lowest acidity levels were detected in cylindrical form. Square and cylinder forms were recorded the lowest of TS, fat, total protein and ash values. Square and cylinder forms possessed the lowest TVBC, LAB and proteolytic bacteria. The triangle or square molds caused significant (p<0.05) increase in wettability, where square form scored the highest syneresis levels among different shapes. The spherical and cylindrical shapes had the minimum values of hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess and chewiness whereas the triangle and square forms possessed the maximum levels.

Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of the very few studies in jameed and the first almost in the study of work forms of jameed and study the effect of shape on the rheological properties and chemical and microbial composition and microscopic for this product, Subsequently, add a new to this product, which is largely consumed in jordan and Egypt recently to manufacture meal "Mansaf".

Effect of Temperature and Time on the Physical Properties of Bread Produced from Wheat – Cocoyam Flour Using Response Surface Methodology

Pages: 63-71
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Effect of Temperature and Time on the Physical Properties of Bread Produced from Wheat – Cocoyam Flour Using Response Surface Methodology

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.58/2016.3.2/58.2.63.71

Citation: 1

Peluola-Adeyemi, O.A , Obi, T.E , Ugbogu, D.I

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Peluola-Adeyemi, O.A , Obi, T.E , Ugbogu, D.I (2016). Effect of Temperature and Time on the Physical Properties of Bread Produced from Wheat – Cocoyam Flour Using Response Surface Methodology. Journal of Food Technology Research, 3(2): 63-71. DOI: 10.18488/journal.58/2016.3.2/58.2.63.71
This  study  investigated  the  effect  of  baking  temperature  and  time  on the  physical  properties  of  bread  from  10% cocoyam  and  90% wheat  flour. A central composite  rotatable  experimental  design  with  two  factors  and  five  levels  were  used. The   independent  factors  were  baking  temperature (174.82 – 251.18oC) and  baking  time (30 – 45min). The responses were specific loaf volume (Y1), crumb moisture (Y2), crumb hardness (Y3) and overall acceptability (Y4). Thirteen (13)  baking  trials  were  performed  with  five  center  points  and  eight  non  center  points. The specific  loaf  volume (3.35 – 3.9cm3/g), crumb  moisture  content (32.1 – 35%), crumb  hardness (70 – 70.48N) and overall  acceptability (4.85 – 8) varied  significantly (P<0.05) with the  baking  temperature  and  time. The panelists preferred the bread baked at 186oC for 45min.

Contribution/ Originality
This study documents the effect of baking temperature and time on the physical properties of bread from wheat- cocoyam flour using response surface methodology and revealed that acceptable bread can be obtained from 90% wheat flour and 10% cocoyam flour at the baking temperature of 1860C for 45mins.