Journal of New Media and Mass Communication

Published by: Conscientia Beam
Online ISSN: 2410-6585
Print ISSN: 2413-841X
Quick Submission    Login/Submit/Track

No. 1

The Basics of Kenyan Morals and the Professional Practice of Journalism: The Case for Society-Centered Media Decency

Pages: 16-29
Find References

Finding References


The Basics of Kenyan Morals and the Professional Practice of Journalism: The Case for Society-Centered Media Decency

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.91/2015.2.1/91.1.16.29

Jonai Wabwire

Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

  1. Beauchamp, L.T. and E.N. Bowie, 1993. Ethical theory and business. 4th Edn., Engligwood Cliffs N.J: Prentice Hall.
  2. Christians Clifford, G., B. Rotzoll Kim and M. Fackler, 1987. Media ethics. 2nd Edn., New York: Longman.
  3. Fortes, M., 1960. Some reflections on ancestor worship in Africa. In International African Seminar. African Systems of Thought. Governance. Berlin, Heidelberg and New York: Spinger.
  4. Goodwin, H.E., 1987. Groping for ethics in journalism. 2nd Edn., Ames: Iowa State University Press.
  5. Kasoma, F.P., 1992. The African editor and journalism ethics and the law in a privatised and pluralistic press. Paper Presented at the Seminar on Freedom of Expression and the Media in Southern Africa, Organised by the Friedrich Ebert Foundation, Zambia, Nov. 23-24.
  6. Kasoma, F.P., 1993. Ethical journalism and the new political liberalisation in Africa: The case of South Africa and Zambia. Paper Presented at the Conference on Making Media Work for Southern Africa's Development, Organised by the Department of Journalism, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa.
  7. Kasoma, F.P., 1994. The adversarial role of the press in Zambia: Ethical perspectives. Paper Presented at the Seminar on Ethics, the Media and the Law, Sponsored by the Ministry of Legal Affairs, Leisure Bay Lodge, Siavonga, Zambia, October 28-29.
  8. Kasoma, F.P., 1994b. Journalism ethics in Africa. Nairobi: African Council for Communication Education (ACCE). London: International African Seminar.
  9. Kasoma, F.P., 1995. Media ownership, ethics and ethnocentrism in Africa. Paper Presented at the Consultation on Ethnicity and the Media Sponsored by the World Association for Christian Communication (WACC) Held at Mindolo Ecumenical Foundation, Kitwe, Zambia, April 23-28.
  10. Mbiti, J.S., 1975. An introduction to African religion: London: Heinemann.
  11. McQuail, D., 1992. Media accountability and freedom of publication. Oxford University Press.
  12. Merril, J.C., 1995. Legacy of wisdom: Great thinkers and journalism. Ames (IO), Iowa SUP.
  13. Merril, J.C., 1996. Journalism ethics: Philosophical foundations for news media. New York: St Martin's Press.
  14. Parrinder, G., 1954. African traditional religion. London: Hutchinsons University Library.
  15. Solomon, R.C., 2005. Introduction to ethics. Belmont: Wadsworth.
  16. Stanford, 2005. Aristotle’s ethics. Available from http://stanford.ed/entries/aristotle-ethics.
  17. Traber, M., 1989. African communications: Problems and prospects. African Media Review, 3: 86-97.
  18. White, R., 1995. Democratisation of communication as a social movement process. In Philip Lee (Eds). The democratisation of communication. Cardiff: University of Wales Press. pp: 92 - 113.
  19. Wilson, M., 1971. Religion and transformation of society: A study in social change in Africa. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  20. WiUoughby, W.C., 1970. The soul of the Bantu. Westport, Connecticut: Negro Universities Press.
  21. Zimmerli, C.W. and R.K. Holzinger, 2007. Corporate ethics and corporate governance. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg.
No any video found for this article.
Jonai Wabwire (2015). The Basics of Kenyan Morals and the Professional Practice of Journalism: The Case for Society-Centered Media Decency. Journal of New Media and Mass Communication, 2(1): 16-29. DOI: 10.18488/journal.91/2015.2.1/91.1.16.29
The theme of this paper is that the communal approach should be used in solving moral hitches in journalism. The individualism and divisionism that permeate the practice of journalism in Kenya today should be thrown away since they are not only unKenyan but also professionally unpleasant. The article asserts that Kenyan journalism should have an ingrained self-correcting mechanism that facilitates journalists counseling one another. It is submitted herein that world journalism, equally overwhelmed with divisionist and selfish styles to the practice of ethical journalism, could learn from Kenya the value of journalistic solidarity and common problem-solving. The paper ends with a recommendation that the world needs journalism with a human face.
Contribution/ Originality
This paper’s primary contribution is finding that Kenyan ethical foundations would, if taken seriously into account in the practice of journalism in Kenya, donate to world journalism, contaminated by questionable objectives and practices, a new lease of life that would make journalists deserve the tag ’respectable professionals’ rather than the present one of ’professional liars’.

Incorporating User Participation in Heritage Institutions: Approaching Institutional Strategies in Relation To New Social Media and Audience Needs

Pages: 1-15
Find References

Finding References


Incorporating User Participation in Heritage Institutions: Approaching Institutional Strategies in Relation To New Social Media and Audience Needs

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.91/2015.2.1/91.1.1.15

Federica Mancini

Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

  1. Abrams, C., J. Falk and M. Adams, 1997. Art around the corner: Year 3 evaluation report. Technical Report. Annapolis, MD: Science Learning.
  2. Castells, M., 1997. La era de la información: Economía, sociedad y cultura. Madrid: Alianza Editorial, 1.
  3. Cordero, P., 2009. Museos 2.0: Las redes sociales como enlace directo entre los museos y su público. Paper Presented at the IV Congress on Cybersociety, Barcelona[Accessed November, 11, 2009].
  4. Csikszentmihalyi, M. and E. Rochberg-Halton, 1981. The meaning of things: Domestic symbols and the self. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  5. Durbin, G., 2004. Learning from amazon and EBay: User-generated material for museum web sites. Museums and the web 2004: Proceedings. [En línea]. Reino Unido: Archives & Museum Informatics. Disponible en. Available form: http://www.archimuse.com/mw2004/papers/durbin/durbin.html [Accessed 25 de Octubre, 2007].
  6. Falk, J., 2009. Identity and the museum visitor experience. Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press.
  7. Giacoma, G. and D. Casali, 2009. Mo.De. - motivational design - versione 1.5. Ibridazioni. Available from http://ibridazioni.com/2009/06/17/mode-motivational-design-versione-15/ [Accessed June 14, 2009].
  8. Hood, M., 1993. After 70 years of audience research, what have we learned? Visitor studies. Theory, Research and Practice, 15: 17–27.
  9. Hooper-Greenhill, E., 1999. Communication in theory and practice. In E. Hooper-Greenhill (Ed.). The educational role of the museum. 2nd Edn., London: Routledge. pp: 28-43.
  10. Luke, J., L.K. Buchner, D. Dierking and B. O’Ryan, 1999. Creative world summative evaluation: California science center. Annapolis, MD: Institute for Learning Innovation.
  11. Manovich, L., 2008. Software takes command. November 2008, unpublished edition. Available from http://softwarestudies.com/softbook/manovich_softbook_11_20_2008.pdf.
  12. Norman, D., 2004. Emotional design: Why we love (or Hate) everyday things. New York: Basic Books.
  13. Santacana Mestre, J. and F.X. Hernández Cardona, 2006. Museología critica. Gijón: Trea,S.L.
  14. Shirky, C., 2008. Here comes everybody: The power of organizing without organizations. New York: Penguin.
  15. Simon, N., 2010. The participatory museum. Santa Cruz: Museum 2.0.
  16. Universal, M., 2008. Power to the people. Social media tracker wave 3. Available from http://universalmccann.bitecp.com/wave_3.pdf [Accessed February 10 , 2014].
  17. Von Appen, K., B. Kennedy and J. Spadaccini, 2006. Community sites & emerging sociable technologies, en J. Trant and D. Bearman (eds.). Museums and the web 2006: Proceedings.  [En línea]. Toronto: Archives & Museum Informatics. Disponible en. Available from: http://www.archimuse.com/mw2006/papers/vonappen/vonappen.htmleditor'snote [Accessed 4 de Enero, 2008].
  18. Wood, D., J. Bruner and G. Ross, 1976. The role of tutoring in problem solving. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 17(2): 89–100.
No any video found for this article.
Federica Mancini (2015). Incorporating User Participation in Heritage Institutions: Approaching Institutional Strategies in Relation To New Social Media and Audience Needs. Journal of New Media and Mass Communication, 2(1): 1-15. DOI: 10.18488/journal.91/2015.2.1/91.1.1.15
The gradual inclusion of the participation of the public in museums through social networks and other tools that enhance the user’s leadership in the management of information and in the knowledge production seems to have led to an evolution in the cultural experience of the public. However, we do not know yet whether the possibility to intervene and manipulate the content really optimize the communication between visitors widening their possibilities of action turning them into a concerned and active audience.  In this study, we have analyzed practices and motivations of on line audience, detecting some guidelines that should be considered when incorporating user participation in heritage institutions. The analysis of when a participatory environment can encourage the dissemination of the contents of the museum and engage audiences in an ongoing and repeated relationship that encompasses even the attendance realm, was performed using a qualitative methodological perspective though supported by some quantitative data related to the profiles of the recipients of cultural activities and their practices in the network. The suggestions proposed, by virtue of being the result of an evaluation process of public preferences, would highlight the real needs of on line visitors and reduce the dissociation between the way that museums seek to use their pages and effective practices of their users. Looking at these results, this research (based on the analysis of four case studies) represents an attempt to approach the strategies adopted by the institutional sphere in relation to the new social media and to the current needs of the public.
Contribution/ Originality
This study documents the digital strategies used by museums of art and design to communicate with their audiences. The paper’s primary contribution is finding those that elicit a positive response from the general public and the factors that are linked implicitly to their success.