Review of Plant Studies

Published by: Conscientia Beam
Online ISSN: 2410-2970
Print ISSN: 2412-365X
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No. 1

Evaluation of Faba Bean (Vicia faba L.) Varieties against Faba Bean Gall Disease in North Shewa Zone, Ethiopia

Pages: 11-20
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Evaluation of Faba Bean (Vicia faba L.) Varieties against Faba Bean Gall Disease in North Shewa Zone, Ethiopia

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.69.2019.61.11.20

Wulita Wondwosen , Mashilla Dejene , Negussie Tadesse , Seid Ahmed

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Wulita Wondwosen , Mashilla Dejene , Negussie Tadesse , Seid Ahmed (2019). Evaluation of Faba Bean (Vicia faba L.) Varieties against Faba Bean Gall Disease in North Shewa Zone, Ethiopia. Review of Plant Studies, 6(1): 11-20. DOI: 10.18488/journal.69.2019.61.11.20
Faba bean gall disease is a newly emerging and devastating disease of faba bean that threaten its production and productivity in Ethiopia. Thus, this study was conducted with the objective to evaluate the reactions of faba bean varieties against faba bean gall disease. A field experiment was conducted at Basona Werana and Ankober Districts, in 2014. Sixteen faba bean varieties along with local check were tested in RCBD design with three replications. Faba bean varieties varied significantly (p<0.05) for both disease and yield parameters. The lowest disease severity, AUDPC and infection rates were recorded from variety Gachena (Lay Gorebela) and Gora and Gachena (Mush). Moreover, the highest (2737 and 3374%-days) AUDPC values were recorded from the variety local and Selale at Mush and Lay Gorebela. The highest yield was obtained from varieties Gora, Gebelcho, Degaga, Gachena and Walki (Mush) and from varieties Gora and Gachena (Lay Gorebela). Also, yield of faba bean correlated negatively and significantly with AUDPC and final severity at both locations, whereas, AUDPC and severity associated positively and significantly from each other. From this study it can be concluded that relatively resistant and high yielder varieties can be used in combination with other control measures. Therefore, in the future, researches on integration of resistance and high yielder varieties with other management options should be conducted.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of the very few studies in Ethiopia which have investigated the response of Faba bean varieties for the newely emerged gall disease. The study assessed seventeen varieties by scientifically comparing them with very important agronomic and disease resistance related attribute and come up with valid conclusion.

Evaluation of Leaf-Water Relation Traits, as Selection Criterion for Developing Drought Resistant Potato (Solanum Tuberosum L.) Genotypes

Pages: 1-10
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Evaluation of Leaf-Water Relation Traits, as Selection Criterion for Developing Drought Resistant Potato (Solanum Tuberosum L.) Genotypes

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.69.2019.61.1.10

Zerihun Kebede , Firew Mekbib , Tesfaye Abebe , Asrat Asfaw

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Zerihun Kebede , Firew Mekbib , Tesfaye Abebe , Asrat Asfaw (2019). Evaluation of Leaf-Water Relation Traits, as Selection Criterion for Developing Drought Resistant Potato (Solanum Tuberosum L.) Genotypes. Review of Plant Studies, 6(1): 1-10. DOI: 10.18488/journal.69.2019.61.1.10
Though breeding for drought resistance is tricky due to the many physiological and biochemical processes involved and their interaction with the environment; availability of precise, cheap and easy to apply selection tool is critical. The present study quantified the response of potato genotypes to drought and identified potential leaf-water relation traits that enables for identifying drought resistant genotypes. The study assessed sixty genotypes under two irrigation regimes: fully watered non-stress and terminal drought, whereby irrigation was withheld after 50 % flowering to induce post-flowering stress. Measurements for various traits were taken following the potato crop trait ontology. The post-flowering stress induced in this study caused a tuber yield reduction of 33.13% compared with the non-stressed treatment. The genotypes responded differently in tuber yielding potential to the drought. This differential tuber yield response to drought was associated with up and downward regulation of multiple traits related to drought adaptation in potatoes. Drought caused downward regulation on trait responses such as harvest index, leaf area, and specific leaf area. Aboveground biomass and relative water content of leaf contributed negatively for tuber yield under stressed condition. Hence, the attributes identified from this study could help the potato breeding program on drought resistance to develop climate resilient potato varieties.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the existing literature vis-à-vis drought adaptive leaf-water relation traits and is one of the very few studies which have evaluated potato genotypes for terminal drought stress. The study assessed sixty genotypes by scientifically comparing them with very important traits and come up with valid conclusion.