Journal of New Media and Mass Communication

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Analysis of Social Media Utilization by Students in Higher Education: A Critical Literature Review of Ghana

Pages: 1-7
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Analysis of Social Media Utilization by Students in Higher Education: A Critical Literature Review of Ghana

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.91.2020.61.1.7

John Demuyakor

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John Demuyakor (2020). Analysis of Social Media Utilization by Students in Higher Education: A Critical Literature Review of Ghana. Journal of New Media and Mass Communication, 6(1): 1-7. DOI: 10.18488/journal.91.2020.61.1.7
Social media has drastically changed the communication perspective of the world through different aspects, both positively and negatively. The existence of social media has made it easy for scholars and non-scholars to pass information in the form of communication as well as has boosted businesses through online advertising and selling. Social media is enhanced by different aspects and forms of technology hence it is safe to say the two go hand in hand in depicting a social and now our academic world. Social media and Institutions of Higher Education work together to explore different skills including critical thinking, collaborations, and knowledge construction. This means that students, lecturers, and professors benefit differently from social media. For instance, in certain countries, social media is accepted as a tool for teaching and learning. Ideally, through social media, one is able to attend online classes without necessarily appearing physically at the lecture hall. In a country like Ghana, social media has paved ways to very many teachers and students in higher educational institutions who have benefited differently. This paper focuses on a literature review of social media utilization by students in higher educational institutions in Ghana. Other concepts of social media will also be explored including the positive and negative effects of social media on students and professors in tertiary education.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the existing literature by logically analyzing the utilization of the social media by students in the higher education institutions in Ghana. Therefore, it documents how the social media tools can be used to promote teaching and learning as a well as its effects on education across the globe.

Syndrome-Analysis of New Media and Political Economy in 21st Century

Pages: 8-11
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Syndrome-Analysis of New Media and Political Economy in 21st Century

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.91.2020.61.8.11

Oloo Daniel Ongonga

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Oloo Daniel Ongonga (2020). Syndrome-Analysis of New Media and Political Economy in 21st Century. Journal of New Media and Mass Communication, 6(1): 8-11. DOI: 10.18488/journal.91.2020.61.8.11
In recent years, social media digital platforms are concentrated in the hands of the few individuals and corporate bodies globally. These giants include Facebook, WeChat, Amazon, Apple, and Google, who operate in the franchised model for-profit, political and economic signification. Their abilities to manipulate data, censor it, and repackages it gives them an upper hand in setting economic and political agenda in these new media markets. With the financial muscles at their disposal, these corporations have continued to mine individual data for their benefits, which is not limited to advertising but also influencing individuals' behaviours in political and social-economic development issues. Datafication and ''platformization'' of individual's data have paved the way for which there is a need to understand the new political economy of subjectivism. Personal information is used for the commodification of messages to make them appealing and create economic imbalances. Although individuals using such kind of platforms benefit from various advantages, which include social development and economic mileages that it is associated with them, they found it a challenge when it comes to the issue of privacy, unwarranted marketing messages, and intrusion into their solicitudes. Personal data is used for profit, tools for research development of new ideologies to direct and make vital political and economic decisions. This article explores the various ways in which the new media political, economic giants have strategized in the influencing of privatization of information for maximization of profits as well as creating barriers to access of vital information by their consumers.
Contribution/ Originality
This study logically analyses and contributes to the existing ever-growing literature on the new media and political economy. Therefore, it documents the importance of alternative usage of open source software that is feasible as a strategy to minimize exploitation from the few corporates’ giants in the new media economy.