Journal of Social Economics Research

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Online ISSN: 2312-6264
Print ISSN: 2312-6329
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The Role of Social Security Program for Enhancing Seniors Longevity

Pages: 1-11
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The Role of Social Security Program for Enhancing Seniors Longevity

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2020.71.1.11

Hatem Bata , Amaechi Nwaokoro , Earnell Seay

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Hatem Bata , Amaechi Nwaokoro , Earnell Seay (2020). The Role of Social Security Program for Enhancing Seniors Longevity. Journal of Social Economics Research, 7(1): 1-11. DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2020.71.1.11
The United States’ social security system seeks to lower seniors’ probability of death. Given this strategic goal, the argument for the support of a government- managed social security program still shows greater promise than the program’s privatization. Americans seem to have greater wellness and longevity under the current government-run social security program. In fact, this program could explain the declining probability of death since the inception of the program. Conversely, many supporters of privatizing the social security system would highlight the huge opportunity costs for their contributions to the social security funds. Yet, many seniors may not withstand the possibility of sustaining financial losses in the volatile financial market. On the other hand, the proponents of the current government-run social security program may overlook potential interest and capital gains that could be realized if the contributions are invested in the private financial market. In a nutshell, social security is widely accepted as a part of the social safety net of the country aiming to improve senior citizens’ wellness and longevity. The social security, as a government-run institution may have come to stay.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated the relationship between the senior’s probability of death explaining the senior’s wellness and longevity in the presence of the social security program.

Re-Engineering Nigerian Economy through Human Capital Development: A Case of Manufacturing Firms In Southern Part of Nigeria

Pages: 12-23
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Re-Engineering Nigerian Economy through Human Capital Development: A Case of Manufacturing Firms In Southern Part of Nigeria

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2020.71.12.23

Onyeizugbe Chinedu Uzochukwu , Oguegbe Tochukwu Matthew , Enaini Stella Olohi

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Onyeizugbe Chinedu Uzochukwu , Oguegbe Tochukwu Matthew , Enaini Stella Olohi (2020). Re-Engineering Nigerian Economy through Human Capital Development: A Case of Manufacturing Firms In Southern Part of Nigeria. Journal of Social Economics Research, 7(1): 12-23. DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2020.71.12.23
The poor economic situation of Africa especially Nigeria has attracted government efforts to re-engineer the economy through bilateral agreements with developed countries, trade, investment which unfortunately have been met with unproductive outcomes. Consequently, it has become imperative to explore possible means of re-engineering the economy especially in Nigeria through development of human capital. Hence, this study examines re-engineering Nigerian economy through human capital development: a case study of manufacturing companies. The study employed the descriptive survey research design. The population of the study was 828 employees from two manufacturing firms which are Innoson Vehicle Manufacturing Co. Ltd in Anambra state and Ibeto Group of Companies Ltd. in Rivers state, out of which 269 participants were used in the study. Data for the study were collected through the use of questionnaire. Data collected was analyzed using the Pearson Product Moment Correlation. Findings of the study indicated that the nature of relationship between skill development and corporate performance in Manufacturing Firms in Southern part of Nigeria is significantly positive. The study concluded that human capital development is an essential tool which improves the nation’s key assets (her citizens), in order to increase and reengineer economic growth and development. It is further recommended that government of Nigeria should inculcate and implement enhanced training and development programmes especially for the youths who have more workforce capacity so as to motivate them in contributing to the nation’s economic growth and development in all sectors.
Contribution/ Originality
The study contributes in the existing literature by establishing how skill development can enhance or reengineer the Nigerian economy through manufacturing firms.

The Impact of Land Price Movements on the Properties in Croatia

Pages: 24-34
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The Impact of Land Price Movements on the Properties in Croatia

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2020.71.24.34

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(2020). The Impact of Land Price Movements on the Properties in Croatia. Journal of Social Economics Research, 7(1): 24-34. DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2020.71.24.34
The Mediterranean countries of the European Union record diversions in real estate along the coast. Based on the hypothesis that land prices are playing a significant role in increasing housing prices, the goal of our research was to determine to what extent that factor is important in Croatia. The reason for price unsteadiness is most often examined through main macroeconomic aspects but very few researches are using land prices as the main assumption of this problem. The study is carried out using Davis and Heathcote (2005) for determining factors of home value. By observing the period from 2002 to 2017 and from the given results we were able to deliver prediction for future market movements until 2025 using the Double exponential smoothing model. The analysis showed that there is a positive correlation between financial crisis and fall of land price index in all parts of Croatia except the coastal region as research proposed initially. It is shown that real estate prices will continue to grow, but the index of land prices will not follow this growth in parallel. Rather other factors like cost of building will have bigger share in the overall price. The outcome provides an important opportunity to advance the understanding of housing market movements in Croatia by regions and might serve as guidance in future policy creation.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of the very few studies which emphasize the importance of land prices in overall real estate prices and bring them into context with the geographical position of the Croatian regions.

Intellectual Property Rights, Human Capital and Innovation in Emerging and Developing Countries

Pages: 35-41
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Intellectual Property Rights, Human Capital and Innovation in Emerging and Developing Countries

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2020.71.35.41

Kamilia Loukil

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Kamilia Loukil (2020). Intellectual Property Rights, Human Capital and Innovation in Emerging and Developing Countries. Journal of Social Economics Research, 7(1): 35-41. DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2020.71.35.41
The innovation literature suggests that the protection of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) is a key determinant of innovation. Recent studies suggest that IPR protection stimulates innovation only under certain conditions. In this paper, we suppose that IPR have a positive impact on technological innovation only in countries with high levels of human capital. The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between intellectual property rights, human capital and technological innovation in the context of emerging and developing countries. To measure innovation, we use the number of patents granted to inventors in a country by the United States Patent and Trademark Office. IPR variable is the Ginarte and Park index, while the stock of human capital is measured by the percentage of the total enrollment among the school-aged population over 15 at the tertiary level. Panel Threshold Regression is applied to data of 46 developing countries for the period 1980-2009. The estimation results provide evidence for the existence of nonlinear relationship between intellectual property rights and innovation depending on human capital’s initial level.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated the relationship between intellectual property rights, human capital and technological innovation in emerging and developing countries.

Entrepreneurship Training for Mitigating Unemployment in Nigeria: How have the Tertiary Institutions Fared?

Pages: 42-50
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Entrepreneurship Training for Mitigating Unemployment in Nigeria: How have the Tertiary Institutions Fared?

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2020.71.42.50

Rosemary I. Eneji , E. N. Nwbagbara , Kati, George Kati

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Rosemary I. Eneji , E. N. Nwbagbara , Kati, George Kati (2020). Entrepreneurship Training for Mitigating Unemployment in Nigeria: How have the Tertiary Institutions Fared?. Journal of Social Economics Research, 7(1): 42-50. DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2020.71.42.50
The increasing unemployment in Nigeria is one of the social problems contributing to abject poverty, crime and other civil vices plaguing the country today. Although the public and private sectors have made some efforts in addressing the problem, available current statistics show that both sectors lack the capacity to solely employ the entire manpower base of the country. Considering the potential of entrepreneurial training for reducing unemployment, the Nigerian government through the National Universities Commission (NUC) introduced entrepreneurial education as a compulsory course in various higher institutions. In this study, we aimed to ascertain the extent to which these institutions have implemented entrepreneurial education for mitigating unemployment in Nigeria, using the University of Calabar as a case study. A combination of structured questionnaires, titled students’ Opinion Questionnaire and review of extant literatures and theoretical framework, was used for the study. The resulting data showed that the tertiary institutions have not significantly contributed to mitigating unemployment through entrepreneurial education, judging from the low students’ acquisition of entrepreneurial skills, their limited exposure to business opportunities and difficulty in sourcing funds to ensure utilization of any acquired skills after graduation.
Contribution/ Originality
The paper's primary contribution is finding that that the tertiary institutions have not significantly contributed to mitigating unemployment through entrepreneurial education, judging from the low students’ acquisition of entrepreneurial skills, their limited exposure to business opportunities and difficulty in sourcing funds to ensure utilization of any acquired skills after graduation.