Animal Review

Published by: Conscientia Beam
Online ISSN: 2409-6490
Print ISSN: 2412-3382
Quick Submission    Login/Submit/Track

No. 1

Essential and Toxic Metals Determination in Imported and Fresh Beef Cattle Meat Sold in Erbil Markets

Pages: 14-18
Find References

Finding References


Essential and Toxic Metals Determination in Imported and Fresh Beef Cattle Meat Sold in Erbil Markets

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar.2020.71.14.18

Azad B. Sabow , Nithal Y. Yakub , Shawnm J. Saleh

Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

Akan, J., Abdulrahman, F., Sodipo, O., & Chiroma, Y. (2010). Distribution of heavy metals in the liver, kidney and meat of beef, mutton, caprine and chicken from Kasuwan Shanu market in Maiduguri Metropolis, Borno State, Nigeria. Research Journal of Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology, 2(8), 743-748.

Al-Zuhairi, W. S., Farhan, M. A., & Ahemd, M. A. (2015). Determine of heavy metals in the heart, kidney and meat of beef, mutton and chicken from Baquba and Howaydir market in Baquba, Diyala Province, Iraq. International Journal of Recent Scientific Research, 6(8), 5965-5967.

Aljaff, P., Rasheed, B. O., & Salh, D. M. (2014). Assessment of heavy metals in livers of cattle and chicken by spectroscopic method. IOSR Journal of Applied Physics, 6, 23-26. Available at: https://doi.org/10.9790/4861-06122326.

Badis, B., Rachid, Z., & Esma, B. (2014). Levels of selected heavy metals in fresh meat from cattle, sheep, chicken and camel produced in Algeria. Annual Research & Review in Biology, 1260-1267. Available at: https://doi.org/10.9734/arrb/2014/7430.

Chelebi, N. A., Bazzaz, J. N. A., Yakub, N. Y., Bazzaz, A. A., & Hammad, G. R. (2015). Heavy metal residues in frozen chicken meat consumed within Erbil province. Merit Research Journal of Medicine and Medical Sciences, 3(11), 517-520.

Chowdhury, M. Z. A., Siddique, Z. A., Hossain, S. A., Kazi, A. I., Ahsan, A. A., Ahmed, S., & Zaman, M. M. (2011). Determination of essential and toxic metals in meats, meat products and eggs by spectrophotometric method. Journal of the Bangladesh Chemical Society, 24(2), 165-172. Available at: https://doi.org/10.3329/jbcs.v24i2.9705.

Daley, C. A., Amber, A., Patrick, S. D., Glenn, A. N., & Stephanie, L. (2010). A review of fatty acid profiles and antioxidant content in grass-fed and grain-fed beef. Nutrition Journal, 9(1), 10-24. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2891-9-10.

Demirezen, D., & Uruç, K. (2006). Comparative study of trace elements in certain fish, meat and meat products. Meat Science, 74(2), 255-260. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.meatsci.2006.03.012.

FAO/WHO. (2011). Joint FAO/WHO food standards programme codex committee on contaminants in foods. Food, 2011, 1-89.

Fathy, A. K., Ali, F. H., Schwagele, F., & Abd-El-Wahab, M. A. (2011). Heavy metal residues in beef carcasses in Beni-Suef abattoir, Egypt. Veterinaria Italiana, 47(3), 351-361.

Harlia, E., & Balia, R. L. (2010). The food safety of livestock products meatball, corned beef, beef burger and sausage studied from heavy metal residues contamination. Animal Production, 12(1), 50-54.

Lee, Y. H., & Stuebing, R. B. (1990). Heavy metal contamination in the river toad, bufo juxtasper (Inger), near a copper mine in East Malaysia. Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 45(2), 272-279. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01700195

López Alonso, M., Benedito, J., Miranda, M., Castillo, C., Hernandez, J., & Shore, R. (2000). Toxic and trace elements in liver, kidney and meat from cattle slaughtered in Galicia (NW Spain). Food Additives & Contaminants, 17(6), 447-457. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/02652030050034028.

Miranda, M., López-Alonso, M., Castillo, C., Hernádez, J., & Benedito, J. L. (2005). Effect of moderate pollution on toxic and trace metal levels in calves from a polluted area of Northern Spain. Environment International - Journal, 31(34), 543–548. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2004.09.025.

Nkansah, M. A., & Ansah, J. K. (2014). Determination of Cd, Hg, As, Cr and Pb levels in meat from the Kumasi Central Abattoir. International Journal of Scientific and Research Publications, 4(8), 1-4.

Pighin, D., Pazos, A., Chamorro, V., Paschetta, F., Cunzolo, S., Godoy, F., . . . Grigioni, G. (2016). A contribution of beef to human health: A review of the role of the animal production systems. The Scientific World Journal, 2016, 1-10. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1155/2016/8681491.

Sabow, A. B., Zulkifli, I., Goh, Y. M., Ab Kadir, M. Z. A., Kaka, U., Imlan, J. C., . . . Sazili, A. Q. (2016). Bleeding efficiency, microbiological quality and oxidative stability of meat from goats subjected to slaughter without stunning in comparison with different methods of pre-slaughter electrical stunning. Plos One, 11(4), e0152661. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0152661.

Santhi, D., Balakrishnan, V., Kalaikannan, A., & Radhakrishnan, K. T. (2008). Presence of heavy metals in pork products in Chennai India. American Journal of Food Technology, 3, 192-199. Available at: https://doi.org/10.3923/ajft.2008.192.199.

Yakupa, N. Y., Sabowa, A. B., Saleh, S. J., & Mohammed, G. R. (2018). Assessment of heavy metal in imported red meat available in the markets of Erbil city. Journal of University of Babylon, 26(6), 177-183.

No any video found for this article.
Azad B. Sabow , Nithal Y. Yakub , Shawnm J. Saleh (2020). Essential and Toxic Metals Determination in Imported and Fresh Beef Cattle Meat Sold in Erbil Markets. Animal Review, 7(1): 14-18. DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar.2020.71.14.18
Meat of cattle (beef) constitutes a greater percentage of red meat in human diets because of its nutritive value and palatability. However, it can be contaminated with heavy metals just like other food materials. Heavy metals are very harmful due to their ability to accumulate in human body. Thus, this examination is completed to decide the heavy metals levels in frozen beef cattle meat obtained from different markets and fresh meat collected randomly from local beef cattle (Iraqi) and imported beef cattle (Brahman) at slaughterhouse in Erbil city. The result showed that the concentrations of most studied heavy metals were found to be significantly higher in imported frozen boneless beef cattle meat than those of fresh boneless meat obtained from local and imported cattle. The results also reveal that the concentrations nickel and lead metals in imported frozen cattle beef meat surpassed as far as possible set by Food and Agricultural Organization. The burden of the body with these components is extremely reliant on the concentration of the different components in main sources of animal protein, namely meat obtained from cattle. Therefore, people that consume imported beef cattle meat are probably going to be presented to higher nickel and lead concentrations and might be harmful to the health.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of the very few studies which have investigated the concentration of some essential and toxic metals in imported and local cattle meat sold in the markets of Erbil city, with emphasis on hygienic and toxicological aspects.

Growth Performance of Kit Rabbits Fed Concentrate Diet Supplemented with Varying Foliage Leaf Meals

Pages: 1-13
Find References

Finding References


Growth Performance of Kit Rabbits Fed Concentrate Diet Supplemented with Varying Foliage Leaf Meals

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar.2020.71.1.13

Falemara, B.C. , Aina O.O. , Shittu, S. , Usman, H.S.

Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS


No any video found for this article.
Falemara, B.C. , Aina O.O. , Shittu, S. , Usman, H.S. (2020). Growth Performance of Kit Rabbits Fed Concentrate Diet Supplemented with Varying Foliage Leaf Meals. Animal Review, 7(1): 1-13. DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar.2020.71.1.13
The study investigated the effects of supplementing concentrate diets of rabbits with Gmelina, Neem, Leucaena combined w/w with Moringa leaf meals on their growth performance. Four dietary treatments consisting of forage and concentrate were formulated alongside with the control diet (without supplement). Twenty-four weaner rabbits of both sexes equal in numbers of males and females were used for the experiment for a period of 12 weeks. The growth experiment was subjected to 4 x 2 factorial experiment in completely randomized design consisting of four experimental diets and two (2) sexes. Proximate composition of the experimental diets, weekly weight gain, feed intake, feed consumption and feed conversion ratio of the rabbits were assessed. As revealed from the findings, the crude protein, crude fat and crude fiber ranged from 9.36% to 36.73%; 6.75% to 11.58%; and 20.12% to 30.24% respectively, while the carbohydrate, ash and moisture content ranged between 57.90% and 73.27%; 6.20% and 17.75%; and 7.76% and 8.20% respectively. The statistical analysis revealed that the experimental treatments had significant effects on the growth rate, feed consumption and feed conversion ratio of the rabbits (p?0.05). A strong positive and significant relationship (0.01 level) was observed between feed consumption and growth rate of the rabbit. The results of the finding suggest that the inclusion of the Moringa forage leaves in the experimental diets favoured the growth performance of the rabbits in terms of growth rate, feed consumption and feed conversion ratio of rabbits.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated, the effects of supplementing concentrate diets of rabbits with mixed foliage augmented Moringa leaf meal and other foliage leafy meals including Gmelina, Neem, Leucaena on optimum growth performance within the shortest possible time.