Journal of New Media and Mass Communication

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No. 2

The Role of Habit and Emotional Regulation on Entertainment Video

Pages: 49-64
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The Role of Habit and Emotional Regulation on Entertainment Video

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.91/2016.3.2/91.2.49.64

Elif Ozkaya

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Elif Ozkaya (2016). The Role of Habit and Emotional Regulation on Entertainment Video. Journal of New Media and Mass Communication, 3(2): 49-64. DOI: 10.18488/journal.91/2016.3.2/91.2.49.64
Communication research has largely sought to explore how users come to consume media. This study examines audience selection of entertainment media, in particular television program genres streamed in the online environment. By drawing from social cognitive theory, it is the aim of this study to investigate whether acts of emotional self-regulation can provide an explanation for selective exposure to media entertainment. In an experimental setting, mood management theory and social cognitive theory are pitted against each other in determining content preference under the influence of sad moods. Putting all subjects in a sad mood, and manipulating habit strengths for comedic and dramatic content, it is predicted that subjects whose emotional self-regulation is depleted will select more habitual entertainment video options than non-depleted subjects.
Contribution/ Originality
This study extends prior research by examining media selection behavior in online environment. The findings of this paper indicate that habits drive selective exposure when individuals are in depleted-resource states regardless of their mood.

Uses of the Hashtag #Blacklivesmatter: A Quantitative Proposal for Researching Online Social Movements

Pages: 34-48
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Uses of the Hashtag #Blacklivesmatter: A Quantitative Proposal for Researching Online Social Movements

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.91/2016.3.2/91.2.34.48

Laura Canuelas , Jorge Santiago Pintor , Evelyn Dean-Olmstead , Silvia Alvarez Curbelo

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Laura Canuelas , Jorge Santiago Pintor , Evelyn Dean-Olmstead , Silvia Alvarez Curbelo (2016). Uses of the Hashtag #Blacklivesmatter: A Quantitative Proposal for Researching Online Social Movements. Journal of New Media and Mass Communication, 3(2): 34-48. DOI: 10.18488/journal.91/2016.3.2/91.2.34.48
This study presents a process to research the elements that influence the creation and proliferation of the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter, and explores the ways Twitter members use this hashtag. This objective is divided in four questions: What types of events influence the use of the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter?, What type of user generated content appears with this hashtag?, What other hashtags are used when #BlackLivesMatter is present? And which emotions (rage, fear or enthusiasm) appear in these messages?  We present a theoretical framework that includes characteristics of microblogging platforms as well as their impact on social movements of the last decade. The methodology uses a quantitative approach to analyze a sample of tweets that contain the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter.  The findings indicated that the events that most influences the use of #BlackLivesMatter are the deaths of black people by the hands of police officers, trials and manifestations. Rage is the most common emotion, closely followed by enthusiasm. The user generated content most shared is webpage links and the hashtags that appear most frequently next to #BlackLivesMatter are #Ferguson (427) and #MikeBrown (111).  Future investigations should include a wider range of emotions to be evaluated as well as cross platform analysis.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes to the existing literature on online social movements, hashtag production, emotional and user generated content.