International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Research

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No. 3

Combined Microbial Inoculation as a Promising Approach to Enhance Promiscuous Soybean Nodulation and Nitrogen Content in Sudan Savanna

Pages: 86-97
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Combined Microbial Inoculation as a Promising Approach to Enhance Promiscuous Soybean Nodulation and Nitrogen Content in Sudan Savanna

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.70/2015.2.3/70.3.86.97

Citation: 1

Clement O. Ncho , Didier Lesueur , Adamu A. Yusuf

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Clement O. Ncho , Didier Lesueur , Adamu A. Yusuf (2015). Combined Microbial Inoculation as a Promising Approach to Enhance Promiscuous Soybean Nodulation and Nitrogen Content in Sudan Savanna. International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Research, 2(3): 86-97. DOI: 10.18488/journal.70/2015.2.3/70.3.86.97
Applications of microbial inoculants and reduced amount of inorganic fertilizers could lead to low-input agriculture and sustain smallholders’ crops production. In this study, the effect of promiscuous soybean inoculation with combined microbial inoculants was evaluated during harmattan season under furrow irrigation. Rhizobial inoculants and urea on one hand, and fungal inoculants and triple superphosphate (TSP) on the other hand, were considered as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) sources, respectively. The soil was sandy loam and slightly alkaline. Significant effect from rhizobial inoculants was observed on nodule dry weight. As well, the interaction between N and P source had significant effect on %Ndfa. The interaction between 1495MAR and TSP induced the highest %Ndfa. The dual inoculation of 1495MAR and Rhizatech induced relatively high shoot N content. This study showed TGx soybean responded to rhizobial inoculation in Nigeria Sudan savanna. It showed that biofertilizers could effectively increase soybean yield under furrow irrigation. It also suggested that microbial inoculants could perform during harmattan season. Furthermore, the study showed that selective interactions occur between rhizobial strains and fungal inoculants for soybean development.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated the effects of commercial rhizobial and fungal inoculants on promiscuous soybean during harmattan dry season in Sudan savanna.

Variation in Density and Shrinkage between Sawmill and Hand Processed Khaya Senegalensis Woodin Sokoto, North-Western Nigeria

Pages: 77-85
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Variation in Density and Shrinkage between Sawmill and Hand Processed Khaya Senegalensis Woodin Sokoto, North-Western Nigeria

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.70/2015.2.3/70.3.77.85

Malami, A. A , Zubairu, Y.G , Nafiu, A.K.

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Malami, A. A , Zubairu, Y.G , Nafiu, A.K. (2015). Variation in Density and Shrinkage between Sawmill and Hand Processed Khaya Senegalensis Woodin Sokoto, North-Western Nigeria. International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Research, 2(3): 77-85. DOI: 10.18488/journal.70/2015.2.3/70.3.77.85
A research on shrinkage and density variation between sawmill and hand processed Khaya senegalensis timber was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the species in service. The wood samples obtained from Kara market Sokoto were cut into standard sizes for the determination of moisture content, density and shrinkage respectively. Analysis of variance was used to analyze the data. The study reveals that sawmill has an average moisture content of 15.43%, average density of 901.90kg/m3 and volumetric shrinkage of 8.40%. While hand processed Khaya senegalensis has an average moisture content of 15.88%, average density of 812.07kg/m3 and volumetric shrinkage 8.12%. However, density recorded in both sawmill and hand processed Khaya senegalensis wood belongs to high class, suggesting that even the hand processed can serve the low and middle income class satisfactorily and is thus recommended for economic consideration.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated the relationship between sawmill and hand processed wood in Nigeria. It contributes in the existing literature as well as in the wood preference among the small scale wood users (e.g. Local Carpenters) and large scale furniture factories in North-Western Nigeria. 

Screening of Some Coffee Arabica Genotypes Against Coffee Wilt Diseases (Gibberella Xylarioides Heim And Saccus) At Jimma, Southwest Ethiopia

Pages: 66-76
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Screening of Some Coffee Arabica Genotypes Against Coffee Wilt Diseases (Gibberella Xylarioides Heim And Saccus) At Jimma, Southwest Ethiopia

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.70/2015.2.3/70.3.66.76

Citation: 1

Kifle Belachew , Demelash Teferi , Gabisa Gidisa

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Kifle Belachew , Demelash Teferi , Gabisa Gidisa (2015). Screening of Some Coffee Arabica Genotypes Against Coffee Wilt Diseases (Gibberella Xylarioides Heim And Saccus) At Jimma, Southwest Ethiopia. International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Research, 2(3): 66-76. DOI: 10.18488/journal.70/2015.2.3/70.3.66.76
It is essential to reduce coffee yield losses due to coffee wilt disease (CWD) in the country through the development and use of genetically resistant coffee varieties to increase and consistently supply Arabica coffee to the fast growing coffee industry. The soil-borne nature of the pathogen and perennial character of coffee have made management of coffee wilt disease difficult through the conventional control approach of ‘uproot and burn infected trees at the spot’. Therefore, longer-term prospects of successful management of coffee wilt disease depend principally upon employing resistant coffee cultivars. With this objective laboratory and field evaluations were conducted to screen some coffee genotypes against coffee wilt disease. Disease severity or mean percent seedling death ranged from 0.00 to 89.96 %.  The result showed in lowest seedling death rate, long incubation period and high field survival rate of most accessions indicating resistant reaction to coffee wilt disease. Thus present experiment implied that the potential of obtaining coffee wilt disease resistant coffee variety from these accessions provided that they have other desirable traits like resistance to major coffee diseases, high yield and improved quality.
Contribution/ Originality
This study documents coffee genotypes found in coffee gene pool of Ethiopia may hold  key to sustianable survival providing traits needed to cope with new pest outbreak and climate change; this underline the importance of systematic evaluation of coffee accessions and utilization of best performing having  high yielding, good quality.