International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Research

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No. 3

Association between Yield Components of Sorghum (Sorghum Bicolor L. (Moench) Under Different Watering Intervals

Pages: 85-92
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Association between Yield Components of Sorghum (Sorghum Bicolor L. (Moench) Under Different Watering Intervals

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Citation: 2

Elsadig B. Ibrahim , Abdel Wahab H. Abdalla , Elshiekh A. Ibrahim , Ahmed M. El Naim

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Elsadig B. Ibrahim , Abdel Wahab H. Abdalla , Elshiekh A. Ibrahim , Ahmed M. El Naim (2014). Association between Yield Components of Sorghum (Sorghum Bicolor L. (Moench) Under Different Watering Intervals. International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Research, 1(3): 85-92. DOI:
A field experiment was conducted in the Sudan to study the extent of variability in grain yield and yield components of ten sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. ( Moench) genotypesat three environments: Shendi (season, 2005/06), Shambat (season, 2005/06)  and Shambat (season, 2006/07). A split- plot design with four replications was used. Two levels of water treatments were used, namely, irrigation every 10 days and every 21 days (drought stress condition). The main plots were allocated for water treatments and the sub plots for genotypes. Data on five characters, namely seed yield/plant, number of seeds/head, 1000-seed weight, seed yield (kg/ha) and harvest index, were collected. Genotypic and phenotypic correlations between different traits were determined. Grain yield exhibited strong positive phenotypic and genotypic correlations with its components. Significant positive associations were detected between performance of the evaluated genotypes under normal irrigation at Shendi and under water stress at Shamba tseasons (2005/06-2006/07) for number of seeds/head and 1000-seed weight. On the other hand, negative correlations were obtained between the performances at Shendi and Shambat (2006/07) under normal irrigation for seed yield/plant. Generally, these relations influenced the degree of associations between these traits and with the other traits in these environments.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the existing literature by providing data and information concern with interrelationships among grain yield and some of its components in ten grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. (Moench) genotypes under normal irrigation and water stress conditions in three different environments of Sudan

An Assessment of the Level of Awareness of Climate Change and Variability among Rural Farmers in Taraba State, Nigeria

Pages: 70-84
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An Assessment of the Level of Awareness of Climate Change and Variability among Rural Farmers in Taraba State, Nigeria

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E. D. Oruonye

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E. D. Oruonye (2014). An Assessment of the Level of Awareness of Climate Change and Variability among Rural Farmers in Taraba State, Nigeria. International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Research, 1(3): 70-84. DOI:
Previous studies on climate change in Taraba State concentrated on the evidence of climate change in the state, awareness of climate change among students of tertiary institutions in the state and farmers perception and adaptation to climate change in northern Taraba. There is need to have a state wide research that examines climate change awareness and perception among rural farmers in Taraba State. This will greatly reduce the failures in measures to develop a state wide effective monitoring, adaptation and mitigation measures to climate change in the study state. Questionnaires were used to solicit for information from the famers in twelve LGAs of the state. The question ranges from the farmers knowledge of climate change, and how this has affected them over the years. The farmers were asked what they think about the trend of rainfall variables such as total rainfall, onset, cessation, length of rainy season and changes in temperature in the last 10 – 20 years in their area. The farmers were also asked what they think about the trend of incidence of flooding and dry spell in their areas and how this has affected them. Despite the farmers’ awareness and adaptation to climate change in the state, lack of information and capital hinders them from getting the necessary resources and technologies that facilitate adapting to climate change. 
Contribution/ Originality
This study provides recent information on the level of awareness of climate change and variability among rural farmers in Taraba state and current adaption measures employed by the farmers. This will help policy makers to integrate the local knowledge into scientific knowledge in fashioning out effective and sustainable policies on climate change adaptation.

Soil-Blade Interaction of a Rotary Tiller: Soil Bin Evaluation

Pages: 58-69
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Soil-Blade Interaction of a Rotary Tiller: Soil Bin Evaluation

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Subrata Kr. Mandal , Basudeb Bhattacharyya , Somenath Mukherjee , S Karmakar

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Subrata Kr. Mandal , Basudeb Bhattacharyya , Somenath Mukherjee , S Karmakar (2014). Soil-Blade Interaction of a Rotary Tiller: Soil Bin Evaluation. International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Research, 1(3): 58-69. DOI:
In this paper soil-blade investigation of a rotary tiller in a controlled soil bin is presented. Among the soil cutting agricultural tools currently used, the rotary tiller is one of the most promising equipment, saving operating time and labor. In a rotary tiller working tool is always a blade. For the tillage systems, accurately predicting the required torque and penetration force while cutting of soil with a blade is of prime importance as far as the farming operation is concerned. In the tillage operation almost 50% of total farm power is utilized. Draft require for tillage depend on the soil strength and moisture contents along with compactness. So tillage should be done at such a moisture content and soil strength where minimum power will be consumed. This moisture content and soil strength is the optimized value. It is needed to evaluate optimum values of these two important parameters for every type of soil before tillage operation to decrease the loss of power.  Thus in this paper an investigation with regards to moisture content and soil strength which affects penetration resistance force and toque while soil cutting through a rotary tiller blade and has been presented. 


Contribution/ Originality