Current Research in Agricultural Sciences

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No. 4

Assessment of the Physical and Chemical Properties of Three Contrasting Soils Under Different Land Use Systems

Pages: 96-102
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Assessment of the Physical and Chemical Properties of Three Contrasting Soils Under Different Land Use Systems

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.68.2017.44.96.102

Denton O.A , Alemeru M. S. , Fademi I.O. , Uthman A. C. O. , Oyedele A. O.

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Denton O.A , Alemeru M. S. , Fademi I.O. , Uthman A. C. O. , Oyedele A. O. (2017). Assessment of the Physical and Chemical Properties of Three Contrasting Soils Under Different Land Use Systems. Current Research in Agricultural Sciences, 4(4): 96-102. DOI: 10.18488/journal.68.2017.44.96.102
This study was undertaken to evaluate the physical and chemical properties of three contrasting soils under four land use systems. The soil types considered were Vertic Cambisol, Haplic Lixisol and Ferric Luvisol while the land use types studied are cocoa plantation (CP), grazing land (GL), fallow land (FL) and cultivated land (CL). Soil samples were collected at 0-15cm and 15-30cm depths respectively from each of the locations. The soil samples were air dried and passed through a 2mm sieve and taken to the laboratory for analysis. The result of the study showed a higher sand content being recorded in Haplic Lixisol (CL) and Ferric Luvisol 2 (FL) followed by that of Vertic Cambisol (CP) and Ferric Luvisol 1 (GL) in the upper 0 to15 cm depth and lower 15-30 cm. The soil pH within the soil types and depths could be categorized as slightly acidic to moderately alkaline. The organic carbon content of the soils was generally low; it varied from 0.18% to 1.29 % for 0 to 15 cm depth with Vertic Cambisol (CP) having the highest value. The mean available P content was not significantly (P?0.05) different among the soil and land use types. The total nitrogen recorded was generally low 1.006 - 1.304% at 0-15cm while at the lower depth it ranged between 0.566 – 0.768%. The exchangeable bases also decreased following cultivation. The result of the study shows that continuous cultivation without adequate management practices causes a decline in the physical and chemical properties of the soil.
Contribution/ Originality
This paper contributes to existing literature that agriculture being the main user of land is constantly being affected by land use changes. It further seeks to assess how the physical and chemical properties of the different soil types are being affected by different land use types.

Adaptation Study of Mung Bean (Vigna Radiate) Varieties in Raya Valley, Northern Ethiopia

Pages: 91-95
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Adaptation Study of Mung Bean (Vigna Radiate) Varieties in Raya Valley, Northern Ethiopia

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.68.2017.44.91.95

Teame Gereziher , Ephrem Seid , Lemma Diriba , Getachew Bisrat

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Teame Gereziher , Ephrem Seid , Lemma Diriba , Getachew Bisrat (2017). Adaptation Study of Mung Bean (Vigna Radiate) Varieties in Raya Valley, Northern Ethiopia. Current Research in Agricultural Sciences, 4(4): 91-95. DOI: 10.18488/journal.68.2017.44.91.95
In order to investigate the adaptability of mung bean varities; a study was carried out at the research field of Mehoni Agricultural Research Center in 2014/15 cropping season. Nine varities were arranged in 3*3 lattice design with three replications in six rows per plot with 2.4 m wide and 4 m long, and with spacing of 40 cm between rows and 10 cm between plants. Days to flowering, Days to maturity, Plant height, number of pods per plant, number of seeds per pod, hundred seed weight and grain yield per hectare was significantly influenced by variety. The highest grain yield (1362.50 kg ha-1) was obtained from Black bean variety; followed by Shewa robit (1225.00 kg ha-1). On the contrary, the lowest grain yield value (242.60 kg ha-1) was obtained at MH BR-1 variety. Thus, both black bean and Shewa robit varities were best adapted in Raya valley.

Contribution/ Originality
This research finding contributes concrete information and attends the issues of best adaptable varieties to the specific agro-ecology (Raya valley) for mung bean producers.

Feeding Potential of Red Palm Weevil, Rhynchophorus Ferrugineus on Different Date Palm, Phoenix Dactylifera Varieties Under Field Conditions

Pages: 84-90
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Feeding Potential of Red Palm Weevil, Rhynchophorus Ferrugineus on Different Date Palm, Phoenix Dactylifera Varieties Under Field Conditions

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.68.2017.44.84.90

Hakim Ali Sahito , Waheed Ali Kubar , Tasneem Kousar , Nisar Ahmed Mallah , Faheem Ahmed Jatoi , Wali Muhammad Mangrio , Bilawal uddin Ghumro

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Hakim Ali Sahito , Waheed Ali Kubar , Tasneem Kousar , Nisar Ahmed Mallah , Faheem Ahmed Jatoi , Wali Muhammad Mangrio , Bilawal uddin Ghumro (2017). Feeding Potential of Red Palm Weevil, Rhynchophorus Ferrugineus on Different Date Palm, Phoenix Dactylifera Varieties Under Field Conditions. Current Research in Agricultural Sciences, 4(4): 84-90. DOI: 10.18488/journal.68.2017.44.84.90
The date palm, Phoenix dactylifera is one of the main cash crops of Sindh particularly of upper Sindh, district Khairpur. It is main source of nutrients such as; carbohydrates, vitamins etc. It is cultivated on 100,000 acres only in district Khairpur with total production of 293,000 tons, this production is much less as compared to other countries main cause of this low yield is the attack of date palm weevil. About, 3 species of insect pests have been recorded in Pakistan. The feeding behavior of RPW on three verities of date palm, Aseel, Fasly and Karbalian showed that Aseel was most susceptible, weekly observation showed that the given stem piece of Aseel was completely eaten from inside by RPW, while the stem piece of two other varieties partially damaged. Present study revealed that (Rhynchophorus ferrugineus) weevils fed voraciously on Aseel in comparison to two other varieties those have eaten 7.58 mean % of given stem of Aseel while 6.54 of Fasly and 7.06 of Karbalian. Thus, the present study indicated that feeding behavior takes an important role towards control strategy due to lack knowledge of feeding behavior it is imperative to manage this pest.

Contribution/ Originality
This study uses new estimation methodology of biological parameters b/c this study is one of very few studies which have been investigated from the region, Khairpur, Sindh – Pakistan on this vigorous pest of date palm orchards which would be helpful to manage the pest.