Current Research in Agricultural Sciences

Published by: Conscientia Beam
Online ISSN: 2312-6418
Print ISSN: 2313-3716
Quick Submission    Login/Submit/Track

No. 3

Genotype X Environment Interaction and Stability Analysis for Yield and Yield Related Traits of Desi-Type Chickpea (Cicer Arietinum L.) In Ethiopia

Pages: 100-113
Find References

Finding References


Genotype X Environment Interaction and Stability Analysis for Yield and Yield Related Traits of Desi-Type Chickpea (Cicer Arietinum L.) In Ethiopia

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2015.2.3/68.3.100.113

Citation: 1

Getachew Tilahun , Firew Mekbib , Asnake Fikre , Million Eshete

Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

  1. Q. Ali, H. A. Sadaqat, S. Arshad, J. Farooq, M. Ahsan, M. Waseem, and A. Iqbal, "Genetic variability and correlation analysis for quantitative traits in chickpea genotypes (Cicer Arietinum L)," J. Bacteri. Res., vol. 3, pp. 6-9, 2011.
  2. CSA, "Central statistical agency area, production and productivity of agriculture. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia," vol. 1, p. 532, 2012.
  3. P. M. Gaur, S. Tripathi, C. L. L. Gowda, G. V. Ranga Rao, H. C. Sharma, M. S. Pande, and Sharma, Chickpea seed production manual. India: Patancheru, Andhra Pradesh, ICRISAT, 2010.
  4. K. Menale, S. Bekele, A. Solomon, A. Tsedeke, M. Geoffrey, F. Setotaw, E. Million, and A. Kebebew, "Current situation and future outlooks of the chickpea sub-sector in Ethiopia. ICRISAT and EIAR," 2009.
  5. J. K. Bull, M. Cooper, I. H. Delacy, K. E. Basford, and D. R. Woodruff, "Utility of repeated checks for hierarchical classification of data from plant breeding trials," Field Crop. Res., vol. 30, pp. 79-95, 1992.
  6. I. A. Khan, B. A. Malik, and M. Tahir, "Phenotypic stability for yield in chickpea," Pak. J. Sci., vol. 30, pp. 455-456, 1987.
  7. I. A. Khan, B. A. Malik, and M. Bashir, "Investigation of genotype x environment interaction for seed yield in chickpea (Cicer Arietinum L)," Pak J. Bot., vol. 20, pp. 201-204, 1988.
  8. M. S. Bains, S. M. Sharma, S. K. Rao, and S. P. Singh, "Genotype x environment interaction for three selection methods in segregating populations of chickpea," Legume Res., vol. 11, pp. 117-122, 1988.
  9. B. A. Malik, S. A. Hussain, and M. A. Zahid, "Grain legume status in agriculture," Progressive Farming, vol. 3, pp. 23-26, 1988.
  10. H. Bozoglu and A. Gulumser, "Determination of genotype by environment interaction of some agronomic characteristics in dry bean (Phaseolus Vulgaris L)," Turk. J. Agric., vol. 24, pp. 211-222, 2000.
  11. C. Iliadis, "Evaluation of six chickpea varieties for seed yield under autumn and spring sowing," J. Agric. Sci. (Cambridge), vol. 137, pp. 439-444, 2001.
  12. V. Singh and F. Singh, "Genetic diversity and stability in chickpea," Indian J. Genet. Pl. Breed., vol. 49, pp. 349-353, 1974.
  13. A. K. Sanghi and V. S. Kandalkar, "Phenotypic stability of yield and its components in fodder cowpea," Indian J. Genet., vol. 43, pp. 164-167, 2001.
  14. G. Wricke, "Ber eine methode zur erfassung der ökologischen streubreite in feldversuchen," Z. Pflanzenzüchtg, vol. 47, pp. 92-96, 1962.
  15. G. Wricke, "Zur berechnung der ?kovalenz bei sommerweizen und hafer," Z. Pflanzenzuchtg, vol. 52, pp. 127-138, 1964.
  16. A. Asrat, T. Assefa, A. Birhanu, K. Negash, and F. Fisum Alemayehu, "Adaptation and yield stability of small red beans elite lines in Ethiopia," Inter. J. of Pl. Breed. and Genet., vol. 2, pp. 51-63, 2008.
  17. S. A. Eberhart and W. A. Russell, "Stability parameters for comparing varieties," Crop. Sci., vol. 6, pp. 36-40, 1966.
  18. M. Firew, "Yield stability in common bean (Phaseolus Vulgaris) genotypes," Euphytica, vol. 130, pp. 147-153, 2003.
  19. D. F. Ferreira, C. G. B. Demetrio, B. F. J. Manly, A. A. Machado, and R. Vencovsky, "Statistical model in agriculture: Biometrical methods for evaluating phenotypic stability in plant breeding," Cerne Lavras, vol. 12, pp. 373-388, 2006.
  20. P. Tarakanovas and V. Ruzgus, "Additive main effect and multiplicative interaction analysis of grain yield of wheat varieties in Lithuania," Agron. Res., vol. 4, pp. 91 - 98, 2006.
  21. W. Yan and N. A. Tinker, "Biplot analysis of multi-environment trial data: Principles and applications," Can. J. Pl. Sci., vol. 86, pp. 623-645, 2006.
  22. K. Nigussie, "Genotype x environment interaction of released common bean (Phaseolus Vulgaris L)  varieties in Eastern Amhara," M.Sc. Thesis, Presented to the School of Graduate Studies of Haramaya University, Ethiopia, 2012.
No any video found for this article.
Getachew Tilahun , Firew Mekbib , Asnake Fikre , Million Eshete (2015). Genotype X Environment Interaction and Stability Analysis for Yield and Yield Related Traits of Desi-Type Chickpea (Cicer Arietinum L.) In Ethiopia. Current Research in Agricultural Sciences, 2(3): 100-113. DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2015.2.3/68.3.100.113
Chickpea is the major pulses grown in Ethiopia, mainly by subsistence farmers usually under rain-fed conditions. However, its production is constrained due to genotype instability, environmental variability and interaction of genotype with environment. This research was carried out to examine the magnitude of environmental effect on yield of chickpea genotypes and to investigate the stability and adaptability of the genotypes under different agro-ecological conditions. 17 genotypes each of were evaluated in RCBD with four replications in five environments. Various stability indices were used to assess stability and genotype by environment performances. The combined ANOVA for yield and yield related traits revealed highly significant (P≤0.01) differences for genotypes, environments and their interaction. The significant interaction showed that the genotypes respond differently across the various environments. At Akaki, Chefe Donsa, Debre Zeit, Dembia and Haramaya the top performing genotype were DZ-2012-CK-0040 (2229 kg/ha), DZ-2012-CK-0027 (3966 kg/ha), DZ-2012-CK-0040 (4060 kg/ha), DZ-2012-CK-0032 (1394 kg/ha) and Natoli (3247 kg/ha) respectively. The first two PCs explained 84.3% of the variance of original variables for the genotypes. There were remarkable inconsistencies with the univariate stability parameters to select stable genotypes. However, multivariate approach, the AMMI model was better for partitioning the G x E into the causes of variation. Based on ASV value, DZ-2012-CK-0035 was most stable genotype. As per AMMI biplot, Minjar and local variety were the most widely adapted genotypes. Dembia and Haramaya are the most discriminative environments. Environments Debre Zeit and Chefe Donsa were the favorable environment. Genotypes, DZ-2012-CK-0040, DZ-2012-CK-0036 and DZ-2012-CK-0040, DZ-2012-CK-0032 and variety Natoli were recommended as specifically adapted to sites Akaki, Chefe Donsa, Debre Zeit, Dembia and Haramaya respectively. 
Contribution/ Originality

Effects of Ebola (EVD) Outbreak on Bush Meat Marketing and Consumption in Ibarapa Central Local Government Area of Oyo State, Nigeria

Pages: 90-99
Find References

Finding References


Effects of Ebola (EVD) Outbreak on Bush Meat Marketing and Consumption in Ibarapa Central Local Government Area of Oyo State, Nigeria

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2015.2.3/68.3.90.99

Citation: 1

Oyediran, W. O. , Omoare, A. M. , Esenwa, A. O. , Omisore, O. A. , Dick T. T.

Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

  1. R. Nasi, D. Brown, D. Wilkie, E. Bennett, C. Tutin, G. Van Tol, and T. Christophersen, "Conservation and use of wildlife-based resources: The bush meat crisis," CBD Technical Series No. 33. Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity and Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), pp. 1-50. [Accessed 18th December, 2014], 2008.
  2. M. Hogenboom, "Ebola: Is bush meat behind the outbreak? BBC News." Available http://www.bbc.com/news/health-29604204. [Accessed 18th December, 2014], 2014.
  3. W. B. Karesh and E. Noble, "The bush meat trade: Increased opportunities for transmission of zoonotic disease," Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine: A Journal of Translational and Personalized Medicine, vol. 76, pp. 429–434, 2009.
  4. M. Subramanian, "Zoonotic disease risk and the bush meat trade: Assessing awareness among hunters and traders in Sierra Leone," Eco. Health, vol. 9, pp. 471–482, 2012.
  5. A. Kanu and A. Olubade, "Bush meat sellers cry out: Ebola is killing our business, bush meat." Available newtelegraphonline.com [Accessed 16th December, 2014], 2014.
  6. National Population Commission, "Population census of the federal republic of Nigeria," Analytical Report of the National level, NPC, Abuja, 2006.
  7. A. O. Lawal, "Information and communication technology usage in research – extension-farmers linkages system for agricultural development in South West Nigeria," Unpublished PHD Thesis of University of Agriculture Abeokuta Nigeria, 2008.
No any video found for this article.
Oyediran, W. O. , Omoare, A. M. , Esenwa, A. O. , Omisore, O. A. , Dick T. T. (2015). Effects of Ebola (EVD) Outbreak on Bush Meat Marketing and Consumption in Ibarapa Central Local Government Area of Oyo State, Nigeria. Current Research in Agricultural Sciences, 2(3): 90-99. DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2015.2.3/68.3.90.99
Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak was a major threat to public health in Nigeria and it adversely affected the people’s perception on bush meat as it was revealed that wild animals were host of the virus.  Thus, the study assessed the effects of EVD outbreak on bush meat marketing and consumption in Ibarapa Central Local Government Area of Oyo State, Nigeria. Multi stage sampling technique was used to select 85 respondents. Data collected with interview guide and analysed using with descriptive statistics and chi-square analysis. The results showed that 58.80% of the respondents were between 40 – 50 years of age and 73% of the respondents were females. Majority (64.70%) of the respondents had been in bush meat business for more than 10 years. Before the EVD outbreak 37.14% of the respondents had more than 50 customers while patronage reduced to less than 25 customers in a day after EVD outbreak. Similarly, 42% of respondents had more than ₦21,000.00 in a day before EVD outbreak as against less than ₦5,000.00 in a day after the outbreak. Chi-square analysis showed a significant relationship between the sources of information on EVD outbreak and bush meat sales at p < 0.05. It can be concluded that EVD caused reduction in the customers’ patronage and income realized from the sales of bush meat after the outbreak. It is hereby recommended that more awareness should be created by government and other stakeholders that Nigeria is free of EVD, and bush meat is safe for public consumption while Agricultural Extension Agents and Community Health Workers should focus on training and capacity building for quality and healthy bush meat business in the study area
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated the setback caused by the spread of the news of Ebola virus disease outbreak on bush meat sales and consumption in rural communities where cases of Ebola disease virus were not actually reported.

Evaluation of In Vitro Protocols for Elimination of Banana Streak Virus from Tissue Cultured Explants in Banana Seedling Production

Pages: 81-89
Find References

Finding References


Evaluation of In Vitro Protocols for Elimination of Banana Streak Virus from Tissue Cultured Explants in Banana Seedling Production

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2015.2.3/68.3.81.89

G. Mungai , E. Ateka , A. Nyende , D. Miano

Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

  1. FAO, "Food and agriculture organization of the united nations," 2010.
  2. ISAAA, "International service for the acquisition of agri-biotech applications," Annual Report, Available: http:// www.isaaa.org, 1999.
  3. L. Karanja, A. Wangai, G. Harper, J. Stanley, and R. Pathak, "Molecular detection and variability of banana streak virus isolates in Kenya," Journal of Phytopathology, vol. 156, pp. 678-686, 2008.
  4. E. Kahangi, A. Muthee, and B. Chege, "Constraints and sustainable solutions for adoption of tissue cultured banana technology and marketing," Acta Horticulturae, vol. 638, pp. 441-447, 2004.
  5. G. Harper, R. Hull, B. Lockhart, and N. Olszewski, " Viral sequences integrated into plant genomes," Annual Review of Phytopathology, vol. 40, pp. 119-136, 2002a.
  6. G. Dahal, J. Hughes, G. Thottappilly, and B. Lockhart, "Effect of temperature on symptom expression and reliability of banana streak badnavirus detection in naturally infected plantain and banana (Musa spp)," Plant Disease, vol. 82, pp. 16-21, 1998a.
  7. B. Lockhart and D. Jones, Banana streak. In diseases of banana, Abaca and Ensete, edited by D.R. Jones. UK. London: CAB International, Wallingford, 2000.
  8. G. Dahal, R. VOrtiz, A. Tenkouano, J. D. A. Hughes, G. Thottappilly, D. Vuylsteke, and B. Lockhart, "Relationship between natural occurrence of banana streak badnavirus and symptom expression, relative concentration of viral antigen, and yield characteristics of some micropropagated Musa spp," Plant Pathology, vol. 49, pp. 68-79, 2000.
  9. J. Daniells, A. Geering, N. Bryde, and J. Thomas, "The effect of banana streak virus on the growth and yield of dessert bananas in tropical Australia," Annals of Applied Biology, vol. 139, pp. 51-60, 2001.
  10. W. Qiaochunand, P. Jari, and T. Valkonen, "Therapy of shoot tips and novel pathogen eradication method science," vol. 14, pp. 119 – 122, 2009.
  11. J. Doyle and J. Doyle, "Isolation of DNA from fresh tissue," Focus, vol. 12, pp. 13-15, 1990.
  12. A. Geering, L. McMichael, R. Dietzgen, and J. Thomas, "Genetic diversity among banana streak virus isolates from Australia," Phytopathology, vol. 90, pp. 921-927, 2000.
  13. G. Harper, D. Hart, S. Moult, and R. Hull, "Detection of banana streak virus in field samples of bananas from Uganda," Annals of Applied Biology, vol. 141, pp. 247-257, 2002b.
  14. T. Murashige and F. Skoog, "A revised medium for rapid growth and bioassays with tobacco cultures," Physiol. Plant, vol. 15, pp. 473-497, 1962.
  15. A. Wangai, L. Karanja, J. Ndung’u, E. Kimani, S. Kilonzo, and F. Nguthi, "Preliminary results on surveys of banana streak virus (BSV) in Kenya," presented at the 2nd Annual Symposium KARI –NPBRC, Njoro Kenya, and Egerton University, 2002.
  16. G. Harper, D. Hart, S. Moult, R. Hull, A. Geering, and J. Thomas, "The diversity of banana streak virus isolates in Uganda," Arch. Virol., vol. 150, pp. 2407–2420, 2005.
No any video found for this article.
G. Mungai , E. Ateka , A. Nyende , D. Miano (2015). Evaluation of In Vitro Protocols for Elimination of Banana Streak Virus from Tissue Cultured Explants in Banana Seedling Production. Current Research in Agricultural Sciences, 2(3): 81-89. DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2015.2.3/68.3.81.89
The banana industry in Kenya is threatened by the presence of Banana streak virus (BSV). The Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT) commercial banana laboratory uses tissue culture (TC) technique for mass propagation of plantlets which are free from most disease causing organisms for commercial purposes. To evaluate in vitro protocols for production of Banana Streak Virus-free TC banana planting materials for farmers, leaf samples were collected from Thika, Kisii, and JKUAT orchards for indexing. The corms were taken through the TC procedure up to the 2nd subculture stage after which they were subjected to three virus elimination techniques; chemotherapy, meristem tip culture and thermotherapy for evaluation. Indexing for BSV using PCR BSV indicated 90, 80 and 40% infection levels for Kisii, JKUAT and Thika orchards, respectively. For chemotherapy evaluation, concentrations of between 10 and 40 mg/l were used resulting in 0 to 90% virus elimination. For thermotherapy, 27°C (control), 32°C, 34°C, 36°C and 38°C for 10 days, resulted in 0 and 90% virus elimination. Meristem tip culture at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5mm (control) gave between 0 and 90% virus elimination, respectively. The study indicates that BSV can be eliminated using chemotherapy, thermotherapy and meristem tip culture.  Chemotherapy using salicylic acid at 20mg/l can be used to eliminate BSV up 90%. It is also easy to implement since it is incorporated into the medium.


Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes to the existing literature on virus elimination from banana planting materials globally and the first logical analysis in the fight against banana streak virus in Kenya.  If adopted, the findings of the study can help banana farmers increase the yield translating to higher income and poverty eradication.