Current Research in Agricultural Sciences

Published by: Conscientia Beam
Online ISSN: 2312-6418
Print ISSN: 2313-3716
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No. 3

Effect of Disc and Tilt Angles of Disc Plough on Tractor Performance under Clay Soil

Pages: 83-94
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Effect of Disc and Tilt Angles of Disc Plough on Tractor Performance under Clay Soil

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Citation: 3

Omer A. Abdalla , Eman A. Mohamed , Ahmed M. El Naim , Mohammed A. El Shiekh , Moayad B. Zaied

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Omer A. Abdalla , Eman A. Mohamed , Ahmed M. El Naim , Mohammed A. El Shiekh , Moayad B. Zaied (2014). Effect of Disc and Tilt Angles of Disc Plough on Tractor Performance under Clay Soil. Current Research in Agricultural Sciences, 1(3): 83-94. DOI:
The three- bottom, fully mounted disc plough (DP) is widely used as a primary tillage implement in the irrigated sector in Middle and Northern Sudan. In the DP, two angles (tilt and disc) affect tractor performance and ploughing quality. This research was conducted at the Demonstration Farm of the Faculty of Agriculture, University of Khartoum to study the effect of two disc angles (43o and 45o) and three tilt angles (15 o, 20o and 25o) on tractor effective field capacity, rear wheel slippage, fuel consumption, ploughing depth and width of cut. Soil of experimental area was clay loam. The experiment was arranged in a split-plot design and replicated three times. Disc angles were assigned to the main plots whereas tilt angles were distributed in the subplots. Tractor forward speed was maintained at the most commonly used ploughing speed (9 km/h). Effective field capacity was increased by 16% with the decrease of disc angle, while the width of cut, was decreased by 15%. The decrease of tilt angle improved penetration of discs into the soil, the highest ploughing depth was recorded for the tilt angle o15 with the disc angle o45, which consequently led to an increase of both rear wheel slippage and fuel consumption rate.


Contribution/ Originality
This paper contributes in the existing literature by providing data and information concern with field capacities, field efficiency and fuel consumption using different disc and tilt angles on tractor performance in the clay soils of Shambat in Sudan

Evaluation of Field Pea (Pisum Sativum L) Genotypes Performance for Yield and Yield Components at Five Growing Environments of Southern Ethiopia

Pages: 65-76
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Evaluation of Field Pea (Pisum Sativum L) Genotypes Performance for Yield and Yield Components at Five Growing Environments of Southern Ethiopia

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Citation: 6

Yasin Goa , Mathewos Ashamo

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Yasin Goa , Mathewos Ashamo (2014). Evaluation of Field Pea (Pisum Sativum L) Genotypes Performance for Yield and Yield Components at Five Growing Environments of Southern Ethiopia. Current Research in Agricultural Sciences, 1(3): 65-76. DOI:
Field experiments consisting of 24 field pea genotypes were evaluated for performance and correlation of yield and its components in five locations of Southern region, Ethiopia using a randomized complete block design with three replications during 2006/07. Data on some agronomical traits such as number of pods per plant, number of seeds per plant, number of seeds per pod, Harvest index, 100 seed weight, plant height, biological yield, and seed yield were recorded. Significant difference was observed in all locations among the field pea genotypes for grain yield. The top mean grain yield (2659 kg ha-1) over the locations was achieved by the genotype Gume followed by Milky (2625 kg ha-1), FpEx-Dz (2511 kg ha-1) and Weyyetu (2460 kg ha-1). Among the test locations maximum mean grain yield was produced at Angacha (3801.98 kg ha-1) followed by Hossana (2087.93 kg ha-1), Freeze (1734.96 t ha-1) and Waka (1428.8 kg ha-1). The mean seed yield and positive environmental indices value of the present study corroborated that Angacha was found to be a favourable environment for the majority of field pea genotypes. Combined analysis of variance (ANOVA) Genotype environment interaction (GEI) was highly significant for all traits of the study though; Markos, IG-51890 and IG-51700 identified to be stable for more than one trait and officially released variety should be demonstrated on farm for acceptability and two ‘pipe line ‘genotypes namely IG-51890 and IG-51700 for further evaluation  in diverse environments of south Ethiopia. Strong positive correlation of number of seeds per plant, number of pods per plant, harvest index, biological yield and plant height with seed yield indicates that these traits should be used as selection criteria to improve grain yield.
Contribution/ Originality
The study with the objective of releasing new varieties from promising field pea genotypes and demonstrating the commercial cultivars for growing areas of southern region, Ethiopia.

Characterization and Association among Yield and Yield Related Traits in Sunflower (Helianthus Annus L) Genotypes

Pages: 77-82
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Characterization and Association among Yield and Yield Related Traits in Sunflower (Helianthus Annus L) Genotypes

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Zenebe Mekonnen Adare

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Zenebe Mekonnen Adare (2014). Characterization and Association among Yield and Yield Related Traits in Sunflower (Helianthus Annus L) Genotypes. Current Research in Agricultural Sciences, 1(3): 77-82. DOI:
Development of genetically improved high yielding genotypes urges the knowledge on nature and magnitude of variability present in the available germplasm. Characterization and association among yield components and their direct and indirect effects on the seed yield of 100 sunflower germplasm introduced from U.S. National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) were investigated using a simple lattice design during 2012/13 cropping season. The ANOVA results showed significant differences (P<0.05) in all the traits studied among the sunflower germplasm. Out of 100 genotype, 38 were found to be distinctive on the basis of studied traits, two genotypes (PI265499, PI650655) were classed individually while the remaining genotypes were distributed into five clusters. The phenotypic and genotypic variances, correlation, heritability and genetic advances were estimated for grain yield and yield related traits.  The highest genotypic and phenotypic variances were observed for plant height (PH), seed yield (YLD), and days to flower (DF) while the lowest were observed for hundred seed weight (HSW), head diameter (HD) and oil content % (OC %). The highest genotypic coefficient of variance was recorded for YLD (31.03) followed by PH (26.20) and OC % (23.74). Broad sense heritability ranged from 63.71 (HSW) to 90.98 (PH). High genetic advance were observed for PH (10013.01), YLD (2227.01), DF (1853.00), and days to mature (DM) (1560.47) indicating the prevalence of additive gene action for inheritance of these traits. Spearman’s coefficient of rank correlation analysis revealed that HD (0.57121**), HSW (0.49039**), DM (0.53312**), DF (0.24103*) and PH (0.5491**) had maximum direct effect resulted positively and significantly (P<0.01) correlated with YLD. These traits can be used to improve the grain yield of sunflower. 


Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated the genetic, phenotypic and environmental variances of sunflower germplasm collection from various sources of origin. The outputs of this study help breeders for easy selection and promotion of germplasms for further study and extrapolation of genes of superior characters in yield improvement.