Current Research in Agricultural Sciences

Published by: Conscientia Beam
Online ISSN: 2312-6418
Print ISSN: 2313-3716
Quick Submission    Login/Submit/Track

No. 1

Land Use/Land Cover Dynamics in Hulet Wogedamea Kebele, Northern Ethiopia

Pages: 36-41
Find References

Finding References


Land Use/Land Cover Dynamics in Hulet Wogedamea Kebele, Northern Ethiopia

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2015.2.1/68.1.36.41

Citation: 1

Temesgen Gashaw , Tigabu Dinkayoh

Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

  1. H. Geist and E. Lambin, "What drives tropical deforestation? A meta-analysis of proximate and underlying causes of deforestation based on sub-national case study evidence," Report Series No. 4. Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium2001.
  2. K. Chen, "An approach to linking remotely sensed data and areal census data," International Journal of Remote Sensing, vol. 23, pp. 37–48, 2002.
  3. B. Fu, L. Chen, K. Ma, H. Zhou, and J. Wang, "The relationships between land use and soil conditions in the hilly area of the Loess Plateau in Northern Shaanxi, China," Catena, vol. 36, pp. 69–78, 2000.
  4. A. Amsalu, S. Leo, and G. Jan de, "Long-term dynamics in land resource use and the driving forces in Beressa Watershed, Highlands of Ethiopia," Journal of Environmental Management, vol. 83, pp. 13-32, 2006.
  5. D. Gessesse and J. Kleman, "Pattern and magnitude of deforestation in the South central rift valley region of Ethiopia," Mountain Research and Development, vol. 27, pp. 162-168, 2007.
  6. G. Temesgen, B. Amare, and M. Abraham, "Evaluations of land use/land cover changes and land degradation in Dera district, Ethiopia: GIS and remote sensing based analysis," International Journal of Scientific Research in Environmental Sciences, vol. 2, pp. 199-208, 2014.
  7. FAO, "GIS and spatial analysis tools for poverty and food insecurity mapping," Environmental and Natural Resources, Working Paper No.7. Rome, Italy, p. 124, 2002.
  8. S. Abate, "Evaluating the land use and land cover dynamics in borena woreda of South Wollo Highlands, Ethiopia," Journal of Sustainable Development in Africa, vol. 13, pp. 87-105, 2011.
  9. T. Belay, "Land-cover/land-use changes in the derekolli catchment of the South Wello Zone of Amhara region, Ethiopia," Michigan State University Press, vol. 18, pp. 1-20, 2002.
  10. M. Messay, "Land-use/land-cover dynamics in Nonno district, central Ethiopia," Journal of Sustainable Development in Africa, vol. 13, pp. 123-139, 2011.
  11. M. Judith, "Land use and land cover changes and their implications for human-wildlife conflicts in the semi-arid rangelands of Southern Kenya," Journal of Geography and Regional Planning, vol. 6, pp. 193-199, 2013.
  12. G. Temesgen and F. Tesfahun, "Evaluation of land use/ land cover changes in East of Lake Tana, Ethiopia," Journal of Environment and Earth Science, vol. 4, pp. 49-53, 2014.
  13. F. Tesfahun and G. Temesgen, "Evaluation of land use/land cover changes of bantneka watershed, Ethiopia," Merit Research Journal of Agricultural Science and Soil Sciences, vol. 2, pp. 81-85, 2014.
No any video found for this article.
Temesgen Gashaw , Tigabu Dinkayoh (2015). Land Use/Land Cover Dynamics in Hulet Wogedamea Kebele, Northern Ethiopia. Current Research in Agricultural Sciences, 2(1): 36-41. DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2015.2.1/68.1.36.41
The objective of the study was to evaluate the land use/land cover dynamics of Hulet Wogedamea Kebele, Northern Ethiopia. Landsat 5 TM 1985 and Landsat 7 ETM+ 2011 were used for the study. Global positioning system and topographical maps of scale 1:50,000 for ground verification; field observations to take ground control points; 20 farming household’s interview to get additional information; ERDAS Imagine 9.1 and ArcGIS 9.3 software for satellite image processing and data analysis were used. The collected data was analyzed mainly using quantitative method.  However, results of farming household’s interview were discussed in line with the quantitative data. The result reveled that there was an expansion of cultivated land and degraded land by 12.8 and 2.58 ha per year respectively from 1985 to 2011 at the expense of forest, shrub and grazing lands. Thus, proper cultivation of the land with appropriate implementation of soil fertility management measures and afforestation and reforestation activities are recommended.


Contribution/ Originality
This paper is original and contributes for the existing literature in Northern Ethiopia by taking Hulet Wogedamea Kebele.

Economics of Sheep Production in Zuru Local Government Area of Kebbi State Nigeria

Pages: 31-35
Find References

Finding References


Economics of Sheep Production in Zuru Local Government Area of Kebbi State Nigeria

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2015.2.1/.68.1.31.35

Baba M.D. , J.S. Dabai , A.M. Sakaba , I.D. Sanchi

Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

  1. R. M. Getemby, Tropical agriculturalist on sheep production, Revised ed. London: Published by the Land and Life Series, 2002.
  2. A. A. Ademosu, The livestock sub-sector in the national development plan: Nigerian production plan. Lagos: Mcmillan Press, 1996.
  3. O. O. Owolabi, "Economics of rabbit production," Paper Presented at the Conference of Rabbit Breeders Association of Nigeria Held at Obafemi Awolowo University Moor Plantation, Ibadan, March 17-18, 1988.
  4. Kebbi State Government (KBSG), Kebbi state government official diary. Nigeria: Directorate of Information, Kebbi, 2008.
  5. National Population Commission (NPC), National census figure: Federal republic of Nigeria. Abuja: Mcmillan Press, 2006.
  6. A. A. Aganga and B. O. Fasanya, "Economic significance of edible offal’s of range fed sokoto red goat," Paper Presented at the Small Ruminant Conference, Zaria Hotel, 10th-12th April, 1985.
  7. A. J. Jirgi and L. Tanko, "Economics of small scale goat production in bida local government area, Niger State," J. of Agric. Res. and Pol., vol. 3, pp. 62-66, 2008.
  8. T. A. Adegeye and J. S. Dittoh, Essentials of agricultural economics. Ibadan: Impact Publishers Nigeria. Limited, 1985.
No any video found for this article.
Baba M.D. , J.S. Dabai , A.M. Sakaba , I.D. Sanchi (2015). Economics of Sheep Production in Zuru Local Government Area of Kebbi State Nigeria. Current Research in Agricultural Sciences, 2(1): 31-35. DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2015.2.1/.68.1.31.35
This study was carried out to investigate the profitability of sheep production in Zuru local government area of Kebbi State. It examined the costs and returns of sheep production as well as problems encountered in sheep production in the study area. Data were collected from a total of 100 respondents using simple random sampling technique in 2014. Descriptive statistics and farm budgeting technique were used in the analysis of data. The costs and returns analysis indicated that, variable cost constituted 69.83% of the total cost of sheep production in the study area, while the fixed cost constituted 30.17%.  However, the average total cost of production was N307, 491.57, the average total revenue was N376, 312.00, gross margin was N161, 572.43 and the net income was N88, 820.43 indicating that sheep production was profitable. Despite the profitability of sheep production, sheep farmers identified feed problem (92%) as their major problem. It is therefore, concluded that sheep production in the study area was profitable. With this level of profitability in sheep enterprise, it is recommended that this finding be disseminated to all practicing and potential sheep farmers in the study area and other communities. It is also recommended that more farmers in the study area and elsewhere should go into sheep production because of its profitability. There should also be practical application of new knowledge to sheep under traditional husbandry system in the study area.

Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the existing literature on sheep production and livestock economics. Sheep production as an approach to economic growth could be relevant in improving the quality of life of farmers. Information on the economics of sheep production is necessary in view of the emerging food crisis in Nigeria.

Evaluation of Some Cowpea (Vigna Unguiculata L. [Walp]) Genotypes for Stability Of Performance Over 4 Years

Pages: 22-30
Find References

Finding References


Evaluation of Some Cowpea (Vigna Unguiculata L. [Walp]) Genotypes for Stability Of Performance Over 4 Years

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2015.2.1/68.1.22.30

Citation: 9

Olayiwola M.O. , P.A.S. Soremi , K.A Okeleye

Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

  1. IITA, Cowpea. A publication of the international institute of tropical agriculture. Nigeria: IITA-Ibadan. ISBN 978-131-332-3, 2007.
  2. J. Lowenberg-DeBoer and G. Ibro, "The potential effect of economic growth and technological innovation on women’s role in the Cowpea value chain in Kano State, Nigeria. USAID/NIGERIA: A study of the cowpea value chain in Kano state, Nigeria, from a pro-poor and gender perspective. Greater access to trade expansion (Gate) project under the women in development IQC.  CONTRACT NO. GEW-I-00-02-00018-00, task order No. 02. 2008," 2008.
  3. S. Ceccarelli, Positive interpretation of genotype by environment interaction in relation to sustainability and biodiversity. In: Plant adaptation and crop improvement. (Eds.): Cooper, M. and Hammer, G. L. Wallingford, UK: CABI, 1996.
  4. S. A. Eberhart and W. A. Russel, "Stability parameters for comparing varieties," Crop Sci., vol. 6, pp. 36-40, 1966.
  5. H. C. Becker and J. Leon, "Stability analysis in plant breeding," Plant Breeding, vol. 101, pp. 1-23, 1988.
  6. M. Kang and R. Magari, "STABLE. A basic program for calculating stability and yield stability," Agron J., vol. 87, pp. 276-277, 1995.
  7. M. O. Olayiwola and O. J. Ariyo, "Relative discriminatory ability of GGE biplot and YSi in the analysis of genotype × environment interaction in Okra (Abelmoschus Esculentus)," International Journal of Plant Breeding and Genetics, vol. 7, pp. 146-158, 2013.
  8. W. Yan and M. S. Kang, GGE biplot analysis: A graphical tool for breeders, geneticists, and agronomists. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2003.
  9. W. Yan, "GGE biplot: A windows application for graphical analysis of multi-environment trial data and other types of two-way data," Agron. J., vol. 93, pp. 1111-1118, 2001.
  10. W. Yan, M. Kang, B. Ma, S. Woods, and P. Cornelius, "GGE biplot vs. AMMI analysis of genotype-by-environment data," Crop Science, vol. 47, pp. 643-655, 2007.
  11. A. L. Nassir and O. J. Ariyo, "Genotype × environment interaction and yield-stability analyses of rice grown in tropical inland swamp," Not Bot Hort Agrobot Cluj., vol. 39, pp. 220-225, 2011.
  12. M. A. Busari, "Soil physical quality and isotopic fractionation aftertillage, application of poultry manure and fertilizers in Abeokuta, South-Western Nigeria," Ph.D Thesis, Department of Soil Science and Land  Management, University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Nigeria, 2011.
  13. Statistical Analysis Software (SAS) Institute Inc. Cary, NC: SAS Institute Inc, 2002.
  14. O. J. Ariyo, "Genotype and environment interplay in crop production," presented at the 25th Inaugural Lecture, University of Agriculture Abeokuta, 2009.
  15. J. B. S. Haldane, "The interaction of nature and nuture," Ann. Eugenics, vol. 13, pp. 197-205, 1946.
  16. B. L. Waldron, H. Asay Kay, and B. Jensen Kevin, "Stability and yield of cool-season pasture grass species grown at five irrigation levels," Crop Sci., vol. 42, pp. 890–896, 2002.
  17. G. M. Heinrich, C. A. Francis, and J. D. Eastin, "Stability of grain sorghum yield components across diverse environments," Crop Sci., vol. 23, pp. 209-212, 1983.
No any video found for this article.
Olayiwola M.O. , P.A.S. Soremi , K.A Okeleye (2015). Evaluation of Some Cowpea (Vigna Unguiculata L. [Walp]) Genotypes for Stability Of Performance Over 4 Years. Current Research in Agricultural Sciences, 2(1): 22-30. DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2015.2.1/68.1.22.30
Genotype × environment interaction (GEI) plays a significant role in determining the desirability or superiority of a genotype, hence the need to evaluate genotypes over wide range of environment. Seven improved cowpea genotypes were evaluated in four environments (years); the late seasons of 2009, 2010. 2011 and 2012 to determine their desirability based on mean grain yield and stability in Abeokuta South-western Nigeria using the Genotype+Genotype×environment (GGE) biplot. IT98K-573-2-1 had the highest mean grain yield while IFE-98-12 had the lowest. There was highly significant Genotype × Environment Interaction on seed yield (p<0.001) indicating the need for GEI analysis. The GGE biplot identified three mega-environments viz AB10 and AB11 as mega-environment 1, AB09 as the mega-environment 2 and AB12 as the third. IT98K-573-2-1, IT04K-333-2 and IT04K-227-4 were the most responsive genotypes in mega-environments 1, 2 and 3 respectively. IT04K-227-4, IT04K-333-2, IT98K-573-1-1and IT98K-573-2-1 were identified to have performed above average while IT99K-1060, LDP10-OBR1 and IFE-98-12 yielded below average. LDP10-OBR1 was the most stable genotype but was low yielding. IT98K-573-2-1 was selected as the best combiner of high yield and stability and the most desirable for Abeokuta South-western Nigeria. AB10 was identified as the best among the test environments.



Contribution/ Originality
This study documents the responses of improved cowpea genotypes to different environments. Genotype by environment interaction continues to have high implications in plant breeding. IT98K-573-2-1 was identified as a well buffered genotype and therefore desirable for selection for further improvement.

Production Efficiency of Sesame in Selamago District of South Omo Zone, Southern Ethiopia

Pages: 8-21
Find References

Finding References


Production Efficiency of Sesame in Selamago District of South Omo Zone, Southern Ethiopia

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2015.2.1/68.1.8.21

Citation: 6

Ermiyas Mekonnen , Endrias Geta , Belaineh Legesse

Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

  1. MoARD (Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development), "Ethiopia’s agricultural sector policy and investment framework 2010-2020," Draft Final Report, 15 September 20102010.
  2. A. Kindie, "Sesame market chain analysis: The case of Metema Woreda, North Gondar zone, Amhara National Regional State," Thesis Presented to School of Graduate Studies of Haramaya University, 2007.
  3. CSA (Central Statistical Authority), "Statistical report on area and crop production. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia," 2011.
  4. D. Sorsa, Sesame trade arrangements, costs and risks in Ethiopia: A baseline survey: Wageningen, 2009.
  5. G. Fekadu, "Analysis of technical efficiency of wheat production: A study in machkel district," M.Sc. Thesis, Presented to School of Graduate Studies of Haramaya University, 2004.
  6. T. I. Yamane, Statistics: An introductory analysis, 2nd ed. New York: Harper and Row, 1967.
  7. D. J. Aigner, K. C. A. Lovell, and P. S. Schmidt, "Formulation and estimation of stochastic models," Journal of Econometrics, vol. 6, pp. 21-37, 1977.
  8. W. Meeusen and J. Van Den Broeck, "Efficiency estimation from cobb-douglas production functions with composed error," International Economic Review, vol. 18, pp. 435-444, 1977.
  9. H. Jema, "Economic efficiency and marketing performance of vegetable production in Eastern and central parts of Ethiopia," Doctorial Thesis, Acta Universitatis Agriculture Sueciae (SLU) Uppsala, Sweden, 2008.
  10. R. O. Kareem, A. O. Dipeolu, A. B. Aromolaran, and A. Samson, "Analysis of technical, allocative and economic efficiency of different pond systems in Ogun State, Nigeria," African Journal of Agricultural Research, vol. 3, pp. 246-25, 2008.
  11. A. L. Kehinde and T. T. Awoyemi, "Analysis of economic efficiency in sawn wood production in South West Nigeria," Journal of Human Ecology, vol. 26, pp. 175-183, 2009.
  12. B. Solomon, "Economic efficiency of wheat seed production: The case of smallholders in womberma Woreda of West Gojjam zone," M.Sc. Thesis, Presented to School of Graduate Studies of Haramaya University, 2012.
  13. K. R. Sharma, P. Leung, and H. M. Zaleski, "Technical, allocative and economic efficiencies in swine production in Hawaii: A comparison of parametric and non-parametric approaches," Agricultural Economics, vol. 20, pp. 23-35, 1999.
  14. A. Arega and M. H. Rashid, "The efficiency of traditional and hybrid maize production in Eastern Ethiopia: An extended efficiency decomposition approach," Journal of African Economics, vol. 15, pp. 91-116, 2005.
  15. M. J. Farrell, "The measurement of productive efficiency," Journal of Royal Statistical Society. Series A, vol. 120, pp. 253-290, 1957.
  16. D. Gujarati, Basic econometrics. Tokyo: McGraw-Hill Companies, 2004.
  17. I. A. Ajibefun, "An evaluation of parametric and non-parametric methods of technical efficiency measurement: Application to small scale food crop production in Nigeria," Journal of Agricultural and Social of Sciences, vol. 4, pp. 95-100, 2002.
  18. T. T. Amos, "An analysis of productivity and technical efficiency of smallholder cocoa farmers in Nigeria," Journal of Social Science, vol. 15, pp. 127-133, 2007.
  19. F. Dolisca and M. J. Curtis, "Technical efficiency of traditional and non-traditional crop production: A case study from Haiti," World Journal of Agricultural Sciences, vol. 4, pp. 416-426, 2008.
  20. T. Kinde, "Technical efficiency of maize production: A case of small-holder farmers in Assosa district," Thesis Presented to School of Graduate Studies of Haramaya University, 2005.
  21. P. Wilson, D. Hadley, S. Ramsden, and I. Kaltsas, "Measuring and explaining technical efficiency in UK potato production," Journal of Agricultural Economics, vol. 49, pp. 294-305, 1998.
  22. S. Rahman, "Profit efficiency among Bangladesh rice farmers." University of Manchester, School of Economic Studies. Discussion Paper Series No. 0203, 2002.
No any video found for this article.
Ermiyas Mekonnen , Endrias Geta , Belaineh Legesse (2015). Production Efficiency of Sesame in Selamago District of South Omo Zone, Southern Ethiopia. Current Research in Agricultural Sciences, 2(1): 8-21. DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2015.2.1/68.1.8.21
The aim of the present study was to measure the levels of technical, allocative and economic efficiencies of sesame producer and identify factors affecting them in selamago district of south Omo zone, Southern Ethiopia.  The study was based on the cross – sectional data collected in 2011/12 production season from 120 randomly selected farm households. Stochastic production frontier model was used to estimate technical, allocative and economic efficiency levels, whereas Tobit model was used to identify factors affecting efficiency levels. The results indicated that there was substantial amount of inefficiency in sesame production in the study area.  Accordingly, the mean technical, allocative and economic efficiencies of sample households were 67.1 per cent, 67.25 per cent and 45.14 percent respectively. Labor and seed were the variables that positively affected the production of sesame. Results of the Tobit model revealed that soil fertility, non farm income and credit access positively and significantly affected TE. Soil fertility had positive and significant effect on AE. On the other hand experience in sesame production, distance of sesame farm form residence, non farm income and extension contact affected AE negatively and significantly. Soil fertility, non farm income and credit access had positive and significant impact on EE. However, extension contact affected EE negatively and significantly. These indicate that there is a room to increase the efficiency in sesame production of the study area. Therefore, government authorities and other concerned bodies should take into consideration the above mentioned socio economic and institutional factors to improve productivity of sesame in the study area.

Contribution/ Originality
In this paper the production efficiency of farmers in the study area and the factors that affect their efficiency in sesame production are identified. This study can be used as a reference for fellow researchers who are interested in the area of production economics specifically that deals with production efficiency.

The Extent of Finger Millet Production in South Omo Zone in the Case of South Ari Woreda

Pages: 1-7
Find References

Finding References


The Extent of Finger Millet Production in South Omo Zone in the Case of South Ari Woreda

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2015.2.1/68.1.1.7

Citation: 2

Wedajo Gebre

Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

  1. D. Asfaw, T. Tessfaye, D. Erenso, T. Taye, M. Feyera, L. Wasihun, T. Alemu, K. H/selassie, W. Andualem, and D. Chemeda, "Genotype by environment interaction and yield stability analysis in finger millet (Eleusine Corancana) in Ethiopia," American Journal of Plant Sciences, vol. 2, pp. 412-414, 2011.
  2. T. Mulatu, A. Debelo, Z. Gutema, and E. Degu, "Finger millet: A potential crop in Ethiopia," In: Proceedings of Work Shop Organized to Re-Establish Sorghum and Millet in Eastern and Central Africa. Kampala, Uganda 6-9 Nov, 1995.
  3. Central Statistical Agency (CSA), "Agricultural sample survey," Report on Area and Production of Crops (Pri-vate Peasant Holdings, Meher Season), Statistical Bulle-tin 446, Addis Ababa, May 2010.
  4. United Nations Development Program (UNDP), "Emergencies unit for Ethiopia," Preliminary Examination of Major Factors Affecting Subsistence Economy of South Omo Zone and Konso Especial Woreda in Western Ethiopia, 1995.
  5. Central Statistical Agency (CSA), "Agricultural sample survey," Report on Area and Production of Crops for Pri-vate Peasant Holdings, Meher Season, Addis Ababa2001.
  6. Jinka Agricultural Reserch Center (JARC), "Crop research department progress report." Unpublished Document, 2011.
No any video found for this article.
Wedajo Gebre (2015). The Extent of Finger Millet Production in South Omo Zone in the Case of South Ari Woreda. Current Research in Agricultural Sciences, 2(1): 1-7. DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2015.2.1/68.1.1.7
In Ethiopia finger millet occupies 4% of the total area allocated to cereals (nearly half a million hectares) each year and also contributes about 4% to the total annual cereal grain production in the country. The production area increased from 342,120 ha to 368,999 ha with an increase of 7.3%, and the productivity increased from 3,769,290 to 5,241,911 quintals with a proportion of 28%. Six varieties (Tadesse, Padet, Wama, Baruda, Degu and Boneya) have been identified for cultivation to date. Though the varieties were initially released for cultivation in the sub-humid and mid altitude areas, their inadvertent introduction in to low rainfall areas found new adaptation zones. The production of these varieties has expanded to dry low altitude areas including regions where the crop was previously unknown.  As a result of frequent drought, farmers in the dry rift valley region of Ethiopia widely adopted the variety that it is currently grown as one of the most important crops in this region. Therefore this study was initiated to discuss the production of finger millet in South Omo Zone, Ari woreda and generates information on the extent of finger millet production which is useful in designing suitable approaches for identifying gaps and intervening production constrains in the target area.The study areas comprised major finger millet producing kebeles of Ari woreda. Ten kebeles were selected systematically. Six year data on finger millet production and productivity was taken from woreda and each kebele. Data were collected through key informant interviews, focus group discussions, and questionnaires during a three-month period .Research in south omo zone, southern research institute and several national programs have resulted in considerable progress and identification of some improved finger millet varieties. The production of the crop in the study area is increasing.

Contribution/ Originality