International Journal of Education and Practice

Published by: Conscientia Beam
Online ISSN: 2310-3868
Print ISSN: 2311-6897
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No. 2

Disaster Management: Planning and Communication Approaches Used in Organizations in Kenya

Pages: 84-89
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Disaster Management: Planning and Communication Approaches Used in Organizations in Kenya

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2016.4.2/61.2.84.89

Beatrice N. Manyasi , Truphena Eshibukule Mukuna

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  1. Argenti, P.A., 2003. Corporate communication. New York: McGraw- Hill.
  2. Coombs, W.T., 2007. Ongoing crisis communication: Planning, managing, and responding. 2nd Edn., Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  3. Hellsloot, I., 2007. The politics of crisis management: Public leadership under. Available from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crisis_management [Accessed March 6th, 2009].
  4. Ian, I.M., 2005. Why some companies emerge stronger and better from a crisis: Seven essential lessons for surviving disaster. New York: AMACOM.
  5. Mayaka, G.E., B. Muriuri and S. Kumba, 2009. The lady all love to hate. The daily nation. Nairobi: Nation Media Group.
  6. Mugenda, O.M. and A.G. Mugenda, 2003. Research methods quantitative and qualitative approaches. Kenya: Nairobi ACB Press.
  7. Osio, W.Y. and D. Owen, 2005. A handbook for beginning researchers. Kisumu, Kenya: Options Printers & Publishers.
Beatrice N. Manyasi , Truphena Eshibukule Mukuna (2016). Disaster Management: Planning and Communication Approaches Used in Organizations in Kenya. International Journal of Education and Practice, 4(2): 84-89. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2016.4.2/61.2.84.89
The purpose of this study was to investigate how disasters are managed in organizations in Kenya. The study objectives were: to examine the planning approaches used in disaster management and to establish the communication approaches used in disaster management. A multiple case study of five organizations was used. The sample size was twenty managers in the sampled organizations. Interview guides and document analysis were used as instruments for data collection. The study revealed that managers in the sampled institutions did not use a proactive approach in disaster management. They lack knowledge about integrating disaster management into strategic planning processes. They also lack knowledge about a proactive approach to communication in disaster management. The researcher recommends that: Training and workshops in disaster management should be provided to managers and other employees.  Organizational members should be exposed to disaster management simulations.

Contribution/ Originality
The paper's primary contribution is finding that disaster planning and communication ought to be integrated with an organizations’ strategic planning, hence using the proactive approach which is effective unlike the reactive approach. To acquire knowledge and skills about disaster planning, education can be used as a vehicle.

Quality Assurance in Higher Education Using Business Intelligence Technology

Pages: 71-83
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Quality Assurance in Higher Education Using Business Intelligence Technology

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2016.4.2/61.2.71.83

Admir Šehidić , Emina Junuz

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  1. Ante, L., 2013. Business intelligence and supply chain management. Doctoral Thesis, Faculty of Economics, Split 2013.
  2. Boris, ?., F. Nihad, H. Vesna, K. Nerma, M. Maja, R. Mirela, Š. Slavica, V.T. Jugoslav and V. Marina, 2011. Quality assurance in higher education – European experiences and practices. Banja Luka: Agency for Development of Higher Education and Quality Assurance.
  3. Efraim, T., S. Ramesh, D. Dursun and K. David, 2010. Business intelligence – a managerial approach. 2nd Edn., Boston: Prentice Hall.
  4. Inmon, W.H., 2005. Building the data warehouse. 3rd Edn., New York: Wiley Publishing.
  5. Mehmed, K., 2011. Data mining – concepts, models, methods, and algorithms. IEEE Press – Willey Computer Publishing.
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Admir Šehidić , Emina Junuz (2016). Quality Assurance in Higher Education Using Business Intelligence Technology. International Journal of Education and Practice, 4(2): 71-83. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2016.4.2/61.2.71.83
The quality of higher education is of particular importance for the development and progress of modern society. Modern higher education institutions aim to improve their services, and establish a system of continuous quality assurance. Within the framework of the European Standards and Guidelines for Quality Assurance, Standard 1.6 requires the implementation of information systems for efficient management of study programs and other activities. During the phase of problem analysis and objectives, in regard to the application of information systems at the University "Dzemal Bijedic", the existence of heterogeneous internal and external data sources was established. In modern management, data is considered a key resource necessary for the survival and development of the institution. Accordingly, the research focus is on the development of models of business intelligence systems that will be based on existing data sources. This system would primarily be used to support internal quality assurance at the University, as well as management support for timely and optimal decision making process. This paper presents the tools and technology of business intelligence, and through practical example demonstrates the possibilities of the system.

Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the raising awareness about using of modern information technologies in the process of quality management in higher education.

Problems of Gifted Students at King Abdullah II Schools for Distinction: Students Perspective

Pages: 55-70
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Problems of Gifted Students at King Abdullah II Schools for Distinction: Students Perspective

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2016.4.2/61.2.55.70

Citation: 1

Mohammad Nayef Ayasreh , Abdallah Hussein El-Omari

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  1. Abdulghani, M., 2010. Distinction and the distinguished teacher. American Bureau of Education. Available from http://mbc3forum.mbc.net/archive/index.php/t-310064.html.
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  4. Al-Harran, A., 2005. Problems of excellent gifted students at the secondary stage in the state of Kuwait. Unpublished MA Thesis, Amman Arab University for Higher Studies, Amman, Jordan.
  5. Al-Jadou'a, E., 2004. Problems of gifted students families and the strategies they use to solve them. Unpublished MA Thesis, Amman Arab University for Higher Studies, Amman, Jordan.
  6. Al-Ma'aitah, K. and M. Al-Bawaliz, 2000. Talent and mental giftedness. Amman: Dar Alfikr Printing, Publishing, and Distribution.
  7. Al-Mekhlafi, N., 1999. Problems of creative thinking secondary stage students in the republic of Yemen, field study. Ph.D. Thesis, Al-Jazeerah University, The Sudan.
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  10. Al-Sroor, N., 2002. Approach to distinguished and gifted education. 3rd Edn., Amman: Dar Alfikr for Printing, Publishing, and Distribution.
  11. Al-Zaiyat, F., 2002. The mentally gifted of learning difficulties, issues of definition, diagnosis, and therapy. 1st Edn., Cairo: Dar Alkitab.
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  15. Jerwan, F., 1999. Talent, excellence, and creativity. UAE: Dar Al-Kitab Al_Jame'I.
  16. Jordanian Ministry of Education, 2005. King Abdullah II schools for distinction KASD0. Available from http://www.Moe.Gov.jo [Accessed 1/4/ 2006].
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  20. Reis, S.M., 1995. Talent ignored, talent diverted: The cultural context underlying giftedness in females. Gifted Child Quarterly, 39(3): 162 - 170.
  21. Suleiman, A.S. and S.G. Ahmad, 2001. The mentally gifted: Characteristics, discovering, educating, and problems. Cairo: Zahra'a Alsharq Bookshop.
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Mohammad Nayef Ayasreh , Abdallah Hussein El-Omari (2016). Problems of Gifted Students at King Abdullah II Schools for Distinction: Students Perspective. International Journal of Education and Practice, 4(2): 55-70. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2016.4.2/61.2.55.70
The study aims at recognizing the problems which gifted students at King Abdullah II Schools for Distinction (KASD) face. The study sample, 240 male and female students, is randomly selected out of the gifted students with a percentage of 50 % of the study society. A forty item questionnaire is prepared to achieve the study objectives. It is distributed into three fields: Problems related to school, to family, and to students. Study results show that problems which KASD students face are rated medium. Problems related to school come first, second those related to students, and finally those related to family. Statistical significant differences are found in the means of study subjects responses according to the gender variable at the two fields of family and school for the males. However, no significant differences are found in the means of the subjects responses according to the school stage variable (basic and secondary).

Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the existing literature a research conducted about gifted students through three different perspectives; school, family, and students. It uses an estimation methodology provided by the gifted students themselves, their school and their families. The researchers talked to the students before constructing the questionnaire. It also originates new formula in giftedness and distinction. It is among few studies which have investigated gifted students necessary needs and problems. The study contributes the logical mono differential analysis on the study fields and the total instrument. Its primary contribution is finding that the problems gifted students face, are almost the same. Finally, it documents for distinction and gifted students' problems in Jordan and the Arab World.

Influence of Laboratory Method on Students’ Mathematical Creativity in Yenagoa Local Government Area of Bayelsa State

Pages: 47-54
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Influence of Laboratory Method on Students’ Mathematical Creativity in Yenagoa Local Government Area of Bayelsa State

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2016.4.2/61.2.47.54

Citation: 1

Ado, I. B. , Nwosu, S. N.

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Ado, I. B. , Nwosu, S. N. (2016). Influence of Laboratory Method on Students’ Mathematical Creativity in Yenagoa Local Government Area of Bayelsa State. International Journal of Education and Practice, 4(2): 47-54. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2016.4.2/61.2.47.54
This study investigated the influence of laboratory method on students’ mathematical creativity in junior secondary schools in Yenagoa, Bayelsa State. The study was guided by three research questions and three hypotheses. The Pretest- Postest non-randomise control group design was adopted for the study. A sample of 122 students from two intact classes selected randomly was used for the study. The instruments for data collection were the Mathematics Creativity Test (MCT) and Students Attitude towards Mathematics Questionnaire (SAMQ). The data collected were analysed using mean and standard deviation, and the Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA). The result indicated that Laboratory method of teaching significantly enhance students’ creativity in mathematics. The method equally enhanced mathematical creativity of both male and female students. Students’ attitude towards mathematics also influenced mathematical creativity significantly. Among others, it was recommended that mathematics teachers should explore the use of laboratory method in teaching various concepts in Junior Secondary School level.

Contribution/ Originality