Journal of Social Economics Research

Published by: Conscientia Beam
Online ISSN: 2312-6264
Print ISSN: 2312-6329
Quick Submission    Login/Submit/Track

No. 2

Financial Literacy of Young Professionals in the Context of Financial Technology Developments in Mauritius

Pages: 119-134
Find References

Finding References


Financial Literacy of Young Professionals in the Context of Financial Technology Developments in Mauritius

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2021.82.119.134

Boolaky A. , Mauree-Narrainen D. , Padachi K

Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS


No any video found for this article.
Boolaky A. , Mauree-Narrainen D. , Padachi K (2021). Financial Literacy of Young Professionals in the Context of Financial Technology Developments in Mauritius. Journal of Social Economics Research, 8(2): 119-134. DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2021.82.119.134
The emergence of financial technology (Fintech) has led to an increased need to promote efforts to boost the financial literacy of young professionals, as the financial decision-making process has become more challenging. The specific objectives of this study are to gauge the financial knowledge of young professionals and analyze their attitudes and behavior in regards to the use of Fintech for basic money management, financial planning and investment decisions. The study also aims to analyze the extent to which Fintech is used and its impact on financial literacy levels. The research methodology employs a dual approach. A quantitative study using a survey targets young professionals in the different occupational groups that constitute the Mauritian professional workforce. A regression model is developed to investigate the impact of Fintech usage and demographic factors on financial literacy. The findings reveal significant differences in financial knowledge, attitudes and behaviors attributable to various demographic factors. Furthermore, Fintech usage is limited to the traditional offerings while more innovative Fintech has relatively lower adoption rates. The study has uncovered the positive impact of Fintech usage on financial literacy, opening avenues for rethinking the content and scope of traditional financial education programs.
Contribution/ Originality
The paper's primary contribution is that it investigates financial literacy through the lens of Fintech development and its adoption by young Mauritian professionals. Financial education and Fintech are no longer dissociable, as the former provides critical financial decision-making skills while the latter offers emerging financing opportunities.

Identifying Combinations of Individual Governance Indicators Essential for Attracting International Capital Flows to Asian Economies

Pages: 108-118
Find References

Finding References


Identifying Combinations of Individual Governance Indicators Essential for Attracting International Capital Flows to Asian Economies

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2021.82.108.118

Hannarong Shamsub , Mahfuzul Haque

Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS


No any video found for this article.
Hannarong Shamsub , Mahfuzul Haque (2021). Identifying Combinations of Individual Governance Indicators Essential for Attracting International Capital Flows to Asian Economies. Journal of Social Economics Research, 8(2): 108-118. DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2021.82.108.118
This study identifies essential combinations of individual governance indicators which influence inward capital flows for a group of seven highly interdependent Asian economies from 1997 to 2017. The panel data was estimated using a Seemingly Unrelated Regression (SUR) model. The findings show that selected governance indicators influence capital inflows together with traditional push and pull economic factors, such as global liquidity, global GDP growth, stock market return, and GDP growth. The study discovered two essential combinations of governance indicators which attract inward capital flows, one influencing portfolio inflow and the other influencing foreign direct investment (FDI). The two combinations of individual governance indicators supplement the role of traditional economic drivers of portfolio investment and FDI. The findings offer some policy implications; policies intending to attract capital flows into the local economies by offering only push and pull economic factors, such as improving the macroeconomic environment, may not be sufficient in the absence of improvement in governance quality. However, not all individual governance indicators are equally important as drivers of capital flows. The two essential combinations of governance factors found in this study should be given top priority for improvement if policymakers intend to attract more portfolio inflows and FDI.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated the combinations of individual governance indicators that attract capital inflow. The paper's primary contribution is finding that there are two combinations of indicators influencing inward capital flows to Asian economies. Those combinations supplement the role of traditional economic drivers.

Human Research Management: Effect of Covid-19 On Workers in the UK Who Have Previously Lost One or Both Arms

Pages: 96-107
Find References

Finding References


Human Research Management: Effect of Covid-19 On Workers in the UK Who Have Previously Lost One or Both Arms

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2021.82.96.107

Stavros Kalogiannidis , Olympia Papaevangelou

Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS


No any video found for this article.
Stavros Kalogiannidis , Olympia Papaevangelou (2021). Human Research Management: Effect of Covid-19 On Workers in the UK Who Have Previously Lost One or Both Arms. Journal of Social Economics Research, 8(2): 96-107. DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2021.82.96.107
The study aims to establish the impact of COVID-19 on the workers who have previously lost one or both arms. The study was motivated by the increased need to establish the current status of disabled workers during the coronavirus pandemic. The study also seeks to establish the effect of change in wages and working from home during the pandemic on the productivity of workers who have lost one or both arms. The pandemic has impacted several sectors across the world, both socially and economically. However, there is limited research targeting workers with disabilities. The study adopted a cross-sectional survey design where data was collected from 100 workers from the UK using an online questionnaire. The findings indicated that working from home and changing wages reduced the productivity of these employees. Workers who remained at their workplaces reported incidences of stigma and discrimination from stressed fellow employees.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of the few studies investigating the impact of COVID-19 on human resource management, especially concerning workers who have previously lost one or both of their arms.

Facing the Challenges of Covid-19 in the Egyptian Banking Sector: The Role of Bricoleurs in Achieving Organizational Innovations via Learning through Improvisation

Pages: 77-95
Find References

Finding References


Facing the Challenges of Covid-19 in the Egyptian Banking Sector: The Role of Bricoleurs in Achieving Organizational Innovations via Learning through Improvisation

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2021.82.77.95

Said Abdo , David Edgar

Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS


No any video found for this article.
Said Abdo , David Edgar (2021). Facing the Challenges of Covid-19 in the Egyptian Banking Sector: The Role of Bricoleurs in Achieving Organizational Innovations via Learning through Improvisation. Journal of Social Economics Research, 8(2): 77-95. DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2021.82.77.95
The COVID-19 pandemic posed many challenges for organizational survival across the world. Innovative capability became a key force in meeting such challenges and was most evident in Egypt’s banking sector. This paper explores, through semi-structured in-depth interviews with six general managers of multinational banks operating in Egypt, what innovation competences may enable organizational improvisers, or bricoleurs, to challenge, change, and achieve innovation during the COVID-19 pandemic. The results were analyzed through the lens of Senge’s five disciplines of learning organizations (Senge, 1990), with a particular consideration for the role of improvisation, and found that personal mastery is the dominant principle and is linked to achieving innovation in organizations. Within this element, the analysis also suggests that improvisation emerges from creativity, past experience, intuition, and distinct triggers, and that innovation competences appear as complementary elements of an organization’s behavior, encapsulated as a form of bricolage when challenges arise and resource constraints prevail. The results suggest that a set of practices and strategies could be applied by general managers to meet the challenges they face involving constraints, such as a shortage of human resource, and that improvisation can form one of their key innovation competences.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes to the existing literature by advancing the conversation on this topic through introducing the concept of the bricoleur as a vehicle to enhance innovative capability and introduce new and novel thinking to the challenges that banks face, as well as to the underpinning theory around Senge’s learning organizations.

Women in Parliament and Public Health Expenditure: Evidence from Sub-Saharan African Countries

Pages: 66-76
Find References

Finding References


Women in Parliament and Public Health Expenditure: Evidence from Sub-Saharan African Countries

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite

DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2021.82.66.76

Gael Fokam , Paloma Mbengono , Guilain Sato , Willy Noumessi , Dessy-Karl Tadadjeu

Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

Andreoni, J., & Vesterlund, L. (2001). Which is the fair sex? Gender differences in altruism. The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 116(1), 293-312. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1162/003355301556419.

Baltrunaite, A., Bello, P., Casarico, A., & Profeta, P. (2014). Gender quotas and the quality of politicians. Journal of Public Economics, 118, 62-74. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpubeco.2014.06.008.

Baqir, R. (2002). Social sector spending in a panel of countries. IMF Working Paper, No. 02/35. 4.2.

Besley, T., & Case, A. (2003). Political institutions and policy choices: Evidence from the United States. Journal of Economic Literature, 41(1), 7-73. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1257/jel.41.1.7.

Beutel, A. M., & Marini, M. M. (1995). Gender and values. American Sociological Review, 60(3), 436-448.

Campa, P. (2011). Gender quotas, female politicians and public expenditures: Quasi-experimental evidence. Working Paper No. 157, ECONPUBBLICA, Universita‘ Bocconi.

Careaga, M., & Weingast, B. (2012). Fiscal federalism, good governance, and economic growth in Mexico. In In Search of Prosperity (Vol. Princeton University Press, pp. 399-436).

Chattopadhyay, R., & Duflo, E. (2004). Women as policy makers: Evidence from a randomized policy experiment in India. Econometrica, 72(5), 1409-1443. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0262.2004.00539.x.

Chen, J., Leung, W. S., & Evans, K. P. (2018). Female board representation, corporate innovation and firm performance. Journal of Empirical Finance, 48, 236-254. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jempfin.2018.07.003.

Clots-Figueras, I. (2011). Women in politics: Evidence from the Indian States. Journal of Public Economics, 95(7-8), 664-690.

Clots-Figueras, I. (2012). Are female leaders good for education? Evidence from India. American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 4(1), 212-244. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1257/app.4.1.212.

Cockx, L., & Francken, N. (2014). Extending the concept of the resource curse: Natural resources and public spending on health. Ecological Economics, 108, 136-149. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2014.10.013.

Debski, J., Jetter, M., Mösle, S., & Stadelmann, D. (2018). Gender and corruption: The neglected role of culture. European Journal of Political Economy, 55, 526-537. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpoleco.2018.05.002.

DiRienzo, C. E., & Das, J. (2019). Women in government, environment, and corruption. Environmental Development, 30, 103-113. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envdev.2019.04.006.

Funk, P., & Gathmann, C. (2010). Gender gaps in policy making: Evidence from direct democracy in Switzerland. Available at SSRN 1306502. Available at: https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1306502.

Funk, P., & Gathmann, C. (2014). Gender gaps in policy making: Evidence from direct democracy in switzerland. Economic Policy, 30(81), 141–181. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1093/epolic/eiu003.

Habibi, N. (1994). Budgetary policy and political liberty: A cross-sectional analysis. World Development, 22(4), 579-586. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/0305-750x(94)90113-9.

Hicks, D. L., Hicks, J. H., & Maldonado, B. (2016). Women as policy makers and donors: Female legislators and foreign aid. European Journal of Political Economy, 41, 46-60. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpoleco.2015.10.007.

Homan, P. (2017). Political gender inequality and infant mortality in the United States, 1990–2012. Social Science & Medicine, 182, 127-135. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.04.024.

Inter-Parliamentary Union. (2017). Parline database on national parliaments. Retrieved from http://www.ipu.org/parline-e/parlinesearch.asp .

Jayasuriya, D. S., & Burke, P. J. (2013). Female parliamentarians and economic growth: Evidence from a large panel. Applied Economics Letters, 20(3), 304-307. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/13504851.2012.697113.

Kennedy, P. (1992). A guide to econometrics. 1998. Massachusetts: MIT Press.

Liang, L.-L., & Mirelman, A. J. (2014). Why do some countries spend more for health? An assessment of sociopolitical determinants and international aid for government health expenditures. Social Science & Medicine, 114, 161-168. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.05.044.

Lv, Z., & Deng, C. (2019). Does women's political empowerment matter for improving the environment? A heterogeneous dynamic panel analysis. Sustainable Development, 27(4), 603-612. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1002/sd.1926.

Mavisakalyan, A., & Tarverdi, Y. (2019). Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make difference? European Journal of Political Economy, 56, 151-164. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpoleco.2018.08.001.

McKinsey Global Institute. (2015). The power of parity: How advancing women’s equality can add 12 trillion to global growth. Shanghai: McKinsey Global Institute.

Mishra, P., & Newhouse, D. (2009). Does health aid matter? Journal of Health Economics, 28(4), 855-872. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhealeco.2009.05.004.

Morrissey, O. (2015). Aid and government fiscal behavior: Assessing recent evidence. World Development, 69, 98-105. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.worlddev.2013.12.008.

Novignon, J., Atakorah, Y. B., & Djossou, G. N. (2018). How does the health sector benefit from trade openness? Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa. African Development Review, 30(2), 135-148. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8268.12319.

Pande, R. (2003). Can mandated political representation increase policy influence for disadvantaged minorities? Theory and evidence from India. American Economic Review, 93(4), 1132-1151. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1257/000282803769206232.

Profeta, P., Puglisi, R., & Scabrosetti, S. (2013). Does democracy affect taxation and government spending? Evidence from developing countries. Journal of Comparative Economics, 41(3), 684-718. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jce.2012.10.004.

Quamruzzaman, A., & Lange, M. (2016). Female political representation and child health: Evidence from a multilevel analysis. Social Science & Medicine, 171, 48-57. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.10.025.

Rehavi, M. M. (2007). Sex and politics: Do female legislators affect state spending. Berkeley: Mimeo, University of California.

Rodríguez, S. P. (2018). The dynamic effects of public expenditure shocks in the United States. Journal of Macroeconomics, 56, 340-360. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmacro.2018.04.005.

Svaleryd, H. (2009). Women’s representation and public spending. European Journal of Political Economy, 25(2), 186–198. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpoleco.2008.12.004.

UN Women. (2011). Progress of the world’s women 2011-2012: In pursuit of justice, UN Women. Retrieved from: https://asiapacific.unwomen.org/en/digital-library/publications/2011/1/progress-of-the-worlds-women-in-pursuit-of-justice.

World Bank. (2015). World development indicators. Retrieved from https://databank.worldbank.org/source/world-development-indicators.

No any video found for this article.
Gael Fokam , Paloma Mbengono , Guilain Sato , Willy Noumessi , Dessy-Karl Tadadjeu (2021). Women in Parliament and Public Health Expenditure: Evidence from Sub-Saharan African Countries. Journal of Social Economics Research, 8(2): 66-76. DOI: 10.18488/journal.35.2021.82.66.76
The linkages between women in politics and economic development have received significant attention from policymakers and researchers. There is a consensus in political economy literature that women are more sociable than men and that the higher number of females in parliament is associated with lower levels of corruption, better quality of environment and a higher level of economic growth. This paper investigates the effect of female representation on public health expenditure on a panel of 40 sub-Saharan African countries from 1995 to 2014. The empirical evidence is based on the ordinary least squares (OLS) method and the instrumental variables (IV-2SLS). The results show that a higher number of women in parliament increases the share of public spending devoted to health. Based on these results, several policy implications can be drawn.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes to the existing studies by providing one of the first empirical study on the effect of political representation of women on public health expenditure in Sub Saharan Africa.