Journal of Tourism Management Research

Published by: Conscientia Beam
Online ISSN: 2313-4178
Print ISSN: 2408-9117
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No. 2

Identifying Opportunities for Tourism Cluster Development in Rural Communities

Pages: 161-172
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Identifying Opportunities for Tourism Cluster Development in Rural Communities

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.31.2021.82.161.172

Bernard Baah-Kumi

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Bernard Baah-Kumi (2021). Identifying Opportunities for Tourism Cluster Development in Rural Communities. Journal of Tourism Management Research, 8(2): 161-172. DOI: 10.18488/journal.31.2021.82.161.172
This work aims to identify economic opportunities for future tourism cluster development in tourism-dependent regions using the case of Taos County, New Mexico. The work analyzes the composition of local tourism economic activities of Taos County by quantifying how concentrated the tourism sector is in the county compared to the United States and the State of New Mexico from 2011 to 2019. The author analyzed data from the New Mexico Department of Tourism’s state and county tourism economic impact reports, the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, and the U.S. Census Bureau using location quotients analysis. Results show that Taos has no high-performing, rising, high-potential tourism-related industry, despite the tourism sector providing a steady economic base for the community. The traveler accommodation industry, which is more concentrated in Taos than the state and the nation, is trending downwards. The arts, recreation and entertainment, transportation, and retail hold the potential for strength in the future, potentially contributing more to the county’s tourism economic base. The implication is that practitioners should work with groups of businesses in the tourism cluster instead of individual businesses to address their shared critical needs.
Contribution/ Originality
A community may have a strong concentration of tourism-related jobs and visitor spending; however, industry gaps may exist. For the first time, this work assesses how well the group of industries within a tourism cluster is doing in terms of their visitor spending growth and sustainability and identifies opportunities for future cluster development.

Local Peoples Perspectives on Religious Tourism: A Research in Demre District of Antalya

Pages: 150-160
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Local Peoples Perspectives on Religious Tourism: A Research in Demre District of Antalya

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.31.2021.82.150.160

Akin Aksu , Emine Nurdan Oksuz

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Akin Aksu , Emine Nurdan Oksuz (2021). Local Peoples Perspectives on Religious Tourism: A Research in Demre District of Antalya. Journal of Tourism Management Research, 8(2): 150-160. DOI: 10.18488/journal.31.2021.82.150.160
Like other industries, tourism and travel industry has been affected too much from global COVID-19 pandemic. The negative effects of pandemic can be easily seen in all tourism types starting from 3S (sea, sand, sun) tourism to religious tourism. According to World Religious Travel Association (WRTA) around 300 million tourists move internationally in religious tourism market. This study aimed to determine the perspectives of the local people living in Demre on religious tourism and to find out whether the local people living in the district were aware of the potential of religious tourism in the district. It also aimed to reveal whether there was a difference between the demographic characteristics of the local people and their perspectives on religious tourism. As a result of the logistic regression analysis conducted within the scope of the research, it was observed that people with high income levels and those working as managers had a low perspective on religious tourism.
Contribution/ Originality
The study aimed to determine the perspectives of the local people living in Demre on religious tourism and to find out whether the local people living in the district were aware of the potential of religious tourism in the district.

Can Sustainable Tourism be more Sustainable? -Lessons Learned from Albergo Diffuso in Italy and East Asia

Pages: 136-149
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Can Sustainable Tourism be more Sustainable? -Lessons Learned from Albergo Diffuso in Italy and East Asia

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.31.2021.82.136.149

Wookjae Yang , Daniel Oh

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Wookjae Yang , Daniel Oh (2021). Can Sustainable Tourism be more Sustainable? -Lessons Learned from Albergo Diffuso in Italy and East Asia. Journal of Tourism Management Research, 8(2): 136-149. DOI: 10.18488/journal.31.2021.82.136.149
This study aims to provide sustainable management strategies for rural communities by examining characteristics of a village hotel, Albergo Diffuso (A.D.), which has evolved through developing sustainable management and adapting to different regional contexts. While A.D. is widely recognized as a sustainable development tool for rural communities utilizing historical and environmental resources, little has been studied on which characteristics make A.D. more sustainable and how it spreads out different cultural and regional regions. No clear distinction between sustainable development and sustainable tourism was found, which interrupts evaluate the sustainability of A.D. management. Therefore, this paper seeks to identify the sustainable characteristics of A.D. and how it spread out to other regional contexts based on a theoretical framework of sustainable development and sustainable tourism. By tracking historical changes in A.D. cases of Europe and Asia, we explored how A.D. has evolved through regional and cultural contexts. In addition, we set a theoretical framework to investigate appropriate concepts explaining sustainability. As a result, sustainable tourism is more appropriate to demonstrate distinctive features of sustainable management that differentiate A.D. from an ordinary hotel theoretical framework for A.D. than sustainable development. The resident-led A.D originated from East Asia can inversely supplement A.D. in Italy as residents develop and operate their socio-cultural assets as sustainable tourism resources. Therefore, developing resident-led A.D. would provide tourists with more sustainable tourism, which gives economic benefits to inhabitants and authentic experiences to tourists.
Contribution/ Originality
The papers primary contribution is finding that the resident-led village hotel adapted and developed in East Asia could complement the Italian village hotel model. Developing resident-led A.D. will provide more sustainable tourism of residents excavating and operating socio-cultural assets in the village.

The Antecedent of Intention to Visit Halal Tourism Areas Using the Theory of Planned Behavior: The Moderating Effect of Religiosity

Pages: 127-135
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The Antecedent of Intention to Visit Halal Tourism Areas Using the Theory of Planned Behavior: The Moderating Effect of Religiosity

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.31.2021.82.127.135

Julina . , Aisah Asnawi , Pardomuan Robinson Sihombing

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Julina . , Aisah Asnawi , Pardomuan Robinson Sihombing (2021). The Antecedent of Intention to Visit Halal Tourism Areas Using the Theory of Planned Behavior: The Moderating Effect of Religiosity. Journal of Tourism Management Research, 8(2): 127-135. DOI: 10.18488/journal.31.2021.82.127.135
Halal tourism has a significant current market share. The increasing number of tourists from Muslim countries is a consideration for many areas to change their marketing strategies. In various works of literature, religiosity plays a role in consumer behavior. In this study, religiosity becomes a mediating variable from the subjective norm, attitude, and perceived behavioral control (PBC) to the intention to visit a halal tourism area. This study modifies the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), intending to understand how intense religiosity affects tourists’ decisions to visit a halal tourism area. The number of respondents in this study amounted to 590 people. Questionnaires were distributed via Google forms to tourists in Indonesia and analyzed through Moderated Regression Analysis to test the moderating effect of the religiosity variable. This research shows new information related to the religiosity variable. TPB can predict the intention to visit a halal tourism area. Subjective norms and attitudes have a positive and significant impact, while PBC has a positive but insignificant impact on intention. Still, religiosity does not play a role in strengthening the three exogenous variables that can affect the intention to visit a halal tourism area. The insignificant impact of religiosity in moderating the three independent variables may be because, in Muslim-majority countries, domestic tourists do not have to consider the halal aspect of a halal tourism area. Halal restaurants and places of worship are relatively easy to find, especially in provinces that are known for having a religious presence.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes to the development of the TPB model by adding the religiosity variable as a moderator to measure the intention to visit a halal tourism area. Currently, the trend towards halal tourism is being promoted, so this study provides a view from the viewpoint of community religiosity.

Evaluating the Effects of Temporal Distance on Tourists Decision-Making Processes

Pages: 117-126
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Evaluating the Effects of Temporal Distance on Tourists Decision-Making Processes

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.31.2021.82.117.126

Ashioya Belinda , Imbaya Beatrice , Timothy Sulo

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Ashioya Belinda , Imbaya Beatrice , Timothy Sulo (2021). Evaluating the Effects of Temporal Distance on Tourists Decision-Making Processes. Journal of Tourism Management Research, 8(2): 117-126. DOI: 10.18488/journal.31.2021.82.117.126
Kenya’s tourism continues to rely heavily on wildlife. Of the approximately 922,000 annual international arrivals during the peak season between June and October, nearly 738,000 head for the Maasai Mara National Game Reserve to witness the seventh wonder of the world, the annual wildebeest migration. Several studies have been conducted based on construal level theory to establish the effect of temporal distance using various factors that determine travel decisions. However, to date, no study has been carried out to establish the effect of temporal distance on destination choice decision-making. As tourism consumption involves making a purchase decision now for a future point in time, this study evaluated the effects of temporal distance on the destination choice decision-making based on the construal level theory framework. The study adopted the survey approach based on a confirmatory research design. Using a sample of 144 drawn from a population of 230 tourists, data was collected and analyzed using correlation, ANOVA, and regression methods. The findings revealed that temporal distance has a positive and significant effect on decision-making regarding destination choice based on levels of construal measured through R=0.324; R2=0.105; ? = 0.295; t= 3.024 > +2; F=9.145; and p=0.003<0.05. The study revealed that temporal distance has a significant effect on the decision process of choosing a destination. In conclusion, therefore, marketing communications targeted at tourists should be intensified well in advance of the season envisioned for traveling to increase the desirability of the destination and thus, influence more tourists to choose the destination. The study also contributes valuably to the literature on tourists’ destination choosing decisions based on temporal distance in the construal level theory framework.
Contribution/ Originality
The study contributes to the existing literature on tourists’ choice of a destination by taking into consideration the effect of temporal distance by adopting the Construal Level Theory (CLT), which has not yet been adopted in service industries such as tourism. And more so in a developing country like Kenya.