International Journal of Sustainable Development & World Policy

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No. 3

Consideration the Relationship Between Information Communications Technology and Economic Growth in Top 10 Economic

Pages: 96-106
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Consideration the Relationship Between Information Communications Technology and Economic Growth in Top 10 Economic

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Sadr Seyed Mohammad Hossein

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Sadr Seyed Mohammad Hossein (2012). Consideration the Relationship Between Information Communications Technology and Economic Growth in Top 10 Economic. International Journal of Sustainable Development & World Policy, 1(3): 96-106. DOI:
In this paper, we examine the relationship between information and communications technology (ICT) development and economic growth in top 10 economic, using panel cointegration, and panel-based error correction models from annual data covering the period of 1980 to 2010. The empirical results support of a short-run cointegration relationship after allowing for the heterogeneous country effect. The long-run relationship is estimated using a full-modified OLS. The evidence shows that short run causalities run from ICT to GDP and vice versa. This means that an increase in ICT directly affects economic growth and that economic growth also stimulates further ICT. The direction of causation between ICT and economic growth has significant policy implications.

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The Climate Change Menace, Food Security, Livelihoods and Social Safety in Northern Ghana

Pages: 80-95
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The Climate Change Menace, Food Security, Livelihoods and Social Safety in Northern Ghana

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Citation: 4

Mamudu A. Akudugu , Abdul-Razak Alhassan

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Mamudu A. Akudugu , Abdul-Razak Alhassan (2012). The Climate Change Menace, Food Security, Livelihoods and Social Safety in Northern Ghana. International Journal of Sustainable Development & World Policy, 1(3): 80-95. DOI:
Since 2007, Northern Ghana has continuously experienced the double tragedy of droughts and floods which are manifestations of climate change. How these climate change manifestations are affecting livelihoods and social organisations of affected people and communities, especially the poor and vulnerable in Northern Ghana remains largely underestimated. This paper examines how climate change affects household food security, livelihoods and social safety in Northern Ghana. The paper conceptualises the transmission mechanisms of the effects of climate change on rural livelihoods. Observations and a desk review were the main methods employed. The main conclusion drawn is that, climate change is being felt in almost all parts of the world, particularly in the developing world including Ghana. Climate change makes affected communities and people vulnerable to food and nutrition insecurity and reduces social safety. It challenges the resilience of the poor and vulnerable across Ghana, especially those in the Northern part of the country where poverty is endemic to cope with emergencies triggered by natural and related disasters. To mitigate the effects of the climate change menace on the livelihoods of the poor and vulnerable, the development and implementation of a holistic climate change adaptation framework across the country and Northern Ghana in particular is recommended. Concerted efforts must be made to ensure that such a framework is socially acceptable, environmentally sustainable, economically viable, gender sensitive and politically stable.  

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