International Journal of Sustainable Energy and Environmental Research

Published by: Conscientia Beam
Online ISSN: 2306-6253
Print ISSN: 2312-5764
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No. 2

Renewable Sources of Energy for Economic Development in Nigeria

Pages: 49-63
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Renewable Sources of Energy for Economic Development in Nigeria

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.13/2015.4.2/13.2.49.63

Danjuma MAIJAMAA , Ladan MAIJAMAA , Mohammed UMAR

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Danjuma MAIJAMAA , Ladan MAIJAMAA , Mohammed UMAR (2015). Renewable Sources of Energy for Economic Development in Nigeria. International Journal of Sustainable Energy and Environmental Research, 4(2): 49-63. DOI: 10.18488/journal.13/2015.4.2/13.2.49.63
It has become widely acknowledged that the rising environmental and economic cost associated with fossil fuel energy has made Renewable Energy (RE) a basic requirement for the development of Nigeria’s economy. The paper focuses on ways of generating electricity with renewable source of energy for economic development in Nigeria. Specifically, the Nigeria’s energy scene, renewable energy potentials and barriers, as well as various national energy policies were analyzed and areas that require attention to achieve sustainable provision of RE were highlighted. Overall, achieving sustainable development in Nigeria lies in addressing the imminent energy crisis facing the country. While fossil fuels have increased in use and declined in supply, excessive usage of fuel wood is already creating environmental problems especially in the Sahel area. But RE brings together climate protection, poverty reduction, and technological progress. 
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the existing literature on the renewable sources of energy in Nigeria by investigating the vast renewable energy resources and potentials in the country and suggested methods to improve energy generation for sustainable development. 

Sustainable Handling of Construction and Demolition (C & D) Waste

Pages: 22-48
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Sustainable Handling of Construction and Demolition (C & D) Waste

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.13/2015.4.2/13.2.22.48

Citation: 5

Shishir Bansal , S K Singh

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  1. Bansal, S. and S.K. Singh, 2014. A sustainable approach towards the construction and demolition waste. International Journal of Innovative Research in Science, Engineering and Technology, (An ISO 3297: 2007 Certified Organization), 3(2): 9226-9235.
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  6. Radonjanin, V., M. Malesev and S.A. Marinkovi, 2012. Recycled concrete as aggregate for structural concrete production. The Masterbuilder, Chennai: 58–72.
Shishir Bansal , S K Singh (2015). Sustainable Handling of Construction and Demolition (C & D) Waste. International Journal of Sustainable Energy and Environmental Research, 4(2): 22-48. DOI: 10.18488/journal.13/2015.4.2/13.2.22.48
Development as a standalone feature has got no status, unless it is sustainable. Development may include active actions in various sectors like medical field, information technology, education etc. But, one field that is an inherent part of all is the construction sector. With the development of society and for the development of society at all fronts, construction activities are seen everywhere. Along with the construction activities, the demolitions of existing structures, which have either outlived their service life or otherwise needing replacement, have to be demolished. It is estimated that the construction industry in India generates about 10-12 million T of waste annually. The waste generation in Delhi itself is estimated to be around 5000 T per day. Thus a need is there to find solution for its sustainable disposable. Dumping of C&D waste is not only unauthorized, but also anti-environmental. It is a huge challenge to the mankind to find sustainable solutions for safe and secure reuse or recycling, so that nothing is required to be disposed or say dumping in an unauthorized manner. There is also a huge demand for natural aggregates in the construction sector with a significant gap in its demand and supply, which can also be reduced marginally by the recycling of construction and demolition waste. Proper handling, storage and treatment of C&D waste not only prevent degradation of Mother Earth, but also have significant impact on sustainability by way of reducing the use of natural resources. The paper covers various issues related to the reusing and recycling of C&D waste, required regulatory mechanism and procedures to be followed for achieving the aim with an ulterior motive of Environmental sustainability.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies, which have investigated into the effective methods and appropriate tools to carry out the demolition of existing structures so that the debris can be put into the reuse or recycling operations, getting useful products and also save Mother Earth from unsustainable degradation.