International Journal of Sustainable Energy and Environmental Research

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No. 2

The Impact of Energy Consumption and Productivity Growth on Carbon Emissions in Ghana

Pages: 121-129
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The Impact of Energy Consumption and Productivity Growth on Carbon Emissions in Ghana

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Ishmael Ackah

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Ishmael Ackah (2014). The Impact of Energy Consumption and Productivity Growth on Carbon Emissions in Ghana. International Journal of Sustainable Energy and Environmental Research, 3(2): 121-129. DOI:
The environment plays two vital roles for mankind. It provides food and raw materials for production and consumption and also accepts the wastes generated through man’s activities and renders them harmless. This calls for sustainable environmental management. This study examines the impact of productivity growth, forest depletion, renewable energy consumption and non-renewable energy consumption on carbon emissions in Ghana. The findings suggest that productivity growth is the most important factor that reduces carbon emissions in the short-run. In the long run however, renewable energy consumption has most influence on carbon emissions. Forest depletion leads to carbon emissions in both the short and long –run. The study recommends that in order to curb carbon emissions, afforestation programmes and investment in renewable energy should be encouraged.
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Sustainable Sources of Energy and the Expected Benefits to Nigerian Economy

Pages: 110-120
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Sustainable Sources of Energy and the Expected Benefits to Nigerian Economy

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Anowor Oluchukwu F. , Achukwu Innocent I. , Ezekwem Ogochukwu S.

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Anowor Oluchukwu F. , Achukwu Innocent I. , Ezekwem Ogochukwu S. (2014). Sustainable Sources of Energy and the Expected Benefits to Nigerian Economy. International Journal of Sustainable Energy and Environmental Research, 3(2): 110-120. DOI:
Sustainable development entails conservation, preservation, accessibility and affordability. When it comes to energy usage, Nigeria relies mostly on conventional source of energy with quite high opportunity cost making it cost-wise comparatively inaccessible for the poor population. In this work, renewable energy sources like solar radiation which is abundantly present in Nigeria was found to offers a much cheaper alternative in meeting the energy demands since they are derived from natural processes that are replenished constantly. Reviews on the opportunities, government policies and strategic developments of renewable energy in Nigeria were carried out to ascertain its feasibility. From the results, it was possible to highlight how these energy sources can be beneficial in tackling the energy problem in Nigeria.
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Subsidies and the Demand for Petroleum Products in Nigeria

Pages: 100-109
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Subsidies and the Demand for Petroleum Products in Nigeria

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Citation: 3

Brahim Idelhakkar , Eleanya K. Nduka , Jude O. Chukwu

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Brahim Idelhakkar , Eleanya K. Nduka , Jude O. Chukwu (2014). Subsidies and the Demand for Petroleum Products in Nigeria. International Journal of Sustainable Energy and Environmental Research, 3(2): 100-109. DOI:
The study empirically examines the effect of subsidies on the consumption of petroleum products in Nigeria for the period of 1970 to 2007. The study employs Augmented-Dickey Fuller (ADF) test for unit root, Engle and Granger (1987) approach for cointegration and Error Correction Model (ECM) for correcting disequilibrium. The ADF test suggests that the variables are mean reverting series after first order difference. The results of the cointegration and ECM confirm that a stable, long-run relationship exists between the demand for petroleum products and their respective determinants: subsidies, real income, prices of the products, prices of substitutes and population. The empirical results show that the elasticity of own and substitutes’ prices are negative, while the own price of diesel, subsidy, real income and population coefficients are positive.  Meanwhile, the coefficient of subsidy on gas demand is negative. Hence, the removal of subsidy from petroleum products is not the problem, but the misapplication of the fund meant for the subsidy. This is due to the fact that the subsidy does not reflect in the prices of petroleum products in Nigeria. Therefore, the managers of the economy should ensure that subsidies are better used to achieve economic growth.
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Development of Solar Energy in Sabah Malaysia: The Case of Trudgill’s Perception

Pages: 90-99
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Development of Solar Energy in Sabah Malaysia: The Case of Trudgill’s Perception

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Citation: 3

Jamalludin Sulaiman , Azlinda Azman , Behnaz Saboori

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Jamalludin Sulaiman , Azlinda Azman , Behnaz Saboori (2014). Development of Solar Energy in Sabah Malaysia: The Case of Trudgill’s Perception. International Journal of Sustainable Energy and Environmental Research, 3(2): 90-99. DOI:
Solar energy in Malaysia was first introduced as one of the five fuels in electricity generation through the Fifth Fuel Policy in 2001. However, the current real harnessing of available solar sources is still below its actual potential. This study examined the non-technical barriers towards solar energy implementation in Sabah located on the Borneo Island on eastern part of Malaysia. Following the theoretical framework, the proposed non-technical barriers are agreement, knowledge, technological, economic, social and political. The results of the study showed that awareness and economics are among the two significant barriers in solar energy implementation in Sabah. This necessitates more appropriate energy and financial policies to help public acceptance of solar energy sources for electricity generation in the region. 
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Solvent Extraction of Oil from Soursop Oilseeds & its Quality Characterization

Pages: 80-89
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Solvent Extraction of Oil from Soursop Oilseeds & its Quality Characterization

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Citation: 8

Adepoju T. F. , Olawale O. , Okunola A. A , Olatunji E. M.

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Adepoju T. F. , Olawale O. , Okunola A. A , Olatunji E. M. (2014). Solvent Extraction of Oil from Soursop Oilseeds & its Quality Characterization. International Journal of Sustainable Energy and Environmental Research, 3(2): 80-89. DOI:
 This study focused on optimization of oil extraction from Soursop oilseeds using Box-Behnken design an allied of Response Surface Methodology (RSM), it also examine the physicochemical properties and fatty acid profile of the oil. Based on the design, 17 experimental runs were conducted to investigate the effects of variables and their reciprocal interactions on the oil yield. A quadratic polynomial and the ANOVA test showed the model to be remarkably significant (p< 0.05). A statistical model predicted the highest oil yield to be 34.6074% (w/w) at the optimal condition of X1 = 38.10 min, X2 = 30.00g and X3 = 100 ml. The experiment was validated as 33.593% (w/w) of oil. The fatty acid profile of the oil revealed the oil to be highly unsaturated (73.42%).  The physicochemical properties of extracted oil revealed that the oil is edible and could serve as feedstock for many industrial applications. This may provide useful information regarding the development of economic and efficient processes using solvent extraction method.
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