International Journal of Veterinary Sciences Research

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Online ISSN: 2410-9444
Print ISSN: 2413-8444
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No. 2

Blood Picture and Selected Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Dromedary Camels Naturally Infected With Trypanosoma Evansi

Pages: 46-53
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Blood Picture and Selected Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Dromedary Camels Naturally Infected With Trypanosoma Evansi

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.110/2015.1.2/110.2.46.53

Citation: 1

I.M. Eljalii , W.M. EL-Deeb , T.A. Fouda , A.M. Almujalli , S.M. El-Bahr

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I.M. Eljalii , W.M. EL-Deeb , T.A. Fouda , A.M. Almujalli , S.M. El-Bahr (2015). Blood Picture and Selected Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Dromedary Camels Naturally Infected With Trypanosoma Evansi. International Journal of Veterinary Sciences Research, 1(2): 46-53. DOI: 10.18488/journal.110/2015.1.2/110.2.46.53
Additional Biomarkers are required for estimation of the oxidative stress status in camel trypanosomiasis. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine lipid peroxidation, enzymatic antioxidants level and hematological indices in camels naturally infected with Trypanosoma evansi and trypanosome free camels (control). The clinical examinations reveled that all the infected camels showed signs of loss of appetite, diarrhea and loss of weight with poor body condition. Hematological analysis revealed a significant decrease  (P=0.022-0.031) in the values of total erythrocytic count (TEC), hemoglobin (Hb) and Packed cell volume (PCV) in trypansoma infected camels (5.0 ± 0.5 ×1012/L; 5.7 ± 0.5 g/dl; 21.8 ± 1.0%) compared to control group (9.6 ± 0.6 ×1012/L; 10.3 ± 0.5 g/dl; 29.1 ± 1.5%). However, the values of total leucocytic counts (TLC) and differential counts were comparable to the control values except for Eosinophils value which were significantly (P=0.023) increased in trypanosome infected camel (6.0 ± 1.9%) compare to the control (1.8 ± 0.8%). Biochemical analysis indicated that, lipid peroxidation level was significantly (P=0.021) increased in trypansoma infected camels as reflected on higher values of malonaldhyde (MDA; 6.3 ± 0.3µM) as compare to the control (0.07 ± 0.01µM). The activity of glutathione reductase was significantly (P=0.025) increased in trypansoma infected camels (1.3 ± 0.01nmol/ml) compare to the control (0.8 ± 0.2nmol/ml) whereas, the activity of super oxide dismutase (SOD) remained unchanged (P=0.072) in trypansoma infected camels compare to the control healthy animal. The present findings concluded that Trypanosoma evansi infection in camels was associated with lipids peroxidation and oxidative stress. In addition, the present study suggests that glutathione reductase may use as oxidative stress biomarker in Trypanosoma evansi infection in camels.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated lipid peroxidation, enzymatic antioxidants level and hematological indices in camels naturally infected with Trypanosoma evansi.

Assessment of Veterinary Inspection Practices on Quality of Beef Produced In Ibarapa Central Local Government Area of Oyo State, Nigeria

Pages: 36-45
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Assessment of Veterinary Inspection Practices on Quality of Beef Produced In Ibarapa Central Local Government Area of Oyo State, Nigeria

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.110/2015.1.2/110.2.36.45

Citation: 1

Oyediran, Wasiu Oyeleke

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Oyediran, Wasiu Oyeleke (2015). Assessment of Veterinary Inspection Practices on Quality of Beef Produced In Ibarapa Central Local Government Area of Oyo State, Nigeria. International Journal of Veterinary Sciences Research, 1(2): 36-45. DOI: 10.18488/journal.110/2015.1.2/110.2.36.45
Beef is an important animal protein source in Nigerian diet and its quality depends on intrinsic and extrinsic attributes. Hence, this study was carried out to assess veterinary inspection practices on quality of beef produced in Ibarapa Central Local Government Area of Oyo State, Nigeria. The findings of this study showed that the butchers were young with mean age of 40.51years and 95.70% were males. All the respondents strongly agreed that facilities such as lighting, carcass carriers, security fence and cooling facilities had never been provided in the study area. The result also showed that 45.70% of the respondents always cleaned the abattoir’s environment once in a week or at month end, and dungs and wastes were dumped around the abattoir. None of the respondents neither hang the beef in the open air nor put it in a deep freezer but always displayed the beef on the table for customers to see. However, all the respondents allowed customers to touch the beef. It was revealed that ante-mortem inspection was always carried out by the Veterinary Officers attached to the abattoirs. The prominent challenges to quality of beef produced are lack of essential infrastructure, training and workshop for the butchers on hygiene practices and use of modern processing equipment. It can be concluded that beef production is a lucrative venture in the study area but the hygiene practices is below Codex Alimentarius recommended standard. It is hereby recommended that the veterinary officers should intensify effort on ante-mortem and post-mortem inspections while health extension workers and other stakeholders should organize a training/workshop on hygiene practices that will improve the quality of beef produced in the study area.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated the effects of veterinary practices on the quality of beef produced for public consumption in the rural areas. The study identified that the veterinary inspection of the beef was not comprehensive and the hygiene practices of butchers were shortcomings. 

Examination of Oribatid Mites for Cysticercoids of Moniezia Sp

Pages: 31-35
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Examination of Oribatid Mites for Cysticercoids of Moniezia Sp

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.110/2015.1.2/110.2.31.35

Reena K. K. , Jobin Thomas , Nirmal Chacko , Lucy Sabu , K. Devada

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Reena K. K. , Jobin Thomas , Nirmal Chacko , Lucy Sabu , K. Devada (2015). Examination of Oribatid Mites for Cysticercoids of Moniezia Sp. International Journal of Veterinary Sciences Research, 1(2): 31-35. DOI: 10.18488/journal.110/2015.1.2/110.2.31.35
Two hundred oribatid mites separated from the soil collected from the vicinity of the manure pits of Cattle and Goat farms under the Kerala Veterinary & Animal Sciences University, Mannuthy using Berlese apparatus. All the mites separated were identified upto family level as Mochlozetidae. On dissection of all the collected mites, one fully developed and an immature cysticercoid could be detected from only one mite.


Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated the role of intermediate host in spreading of cestodiasis. The infection status of intermediate host is the major risk factor for infection in definite host. So it is very important to know the prevalence of infection in intermediate host for taking proper control measures against the disease. Much work has not been done in this field so far. So this is a good initiative and work can be carried forward on a higher level.