International Journal of Management and Sustainability

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No. 8

Influence of the Entrepreneur and Enterprise Characteristics on Success of Cage Fish Farming In the Asuogyaman and South Dayi Districts, Ghana

Pages: 517-529
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Influence of the Entrepreneur and Enterprise Characteristics on Success of Cage Fish Farming In the Asuogyaman and South Dayi Districts, Ghana

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Citation: 3

Anaglo J. N. , Freeman C. K. , Kumah W. K. , Boateng S. D , Manteaw S. A.

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Anaglo J. N. , Freeman C. K. , Kumah W. K. , Boateng S. D , Manteaw S. A. (2014). Influence of the Entrepreneur and Enterprise Characteristics on Success of Cage Fish Farming In the Asuogyaman and South Dayi Districts, Ghana. International Journal of Management and Sustainability, 3(8): 517-529. DOI:
Aquaculture is becoming a very important source of income to many people as well as a source of protein in their diets. This study examined the influence of the entrepreneur and enterprise characteristics on small-scale cage fish enterprises in the Asuogyaman and South Dayi Districts. The research employed a descriptive-correlation survey design, which used quantitative method to collect data from 105 owners and managers of small-scale cage fish enterprises. The findings revealed that age of entrepreneurs influenced customer satisfaction as entrepreneurs experience also influenced growth in sales. It was observed that technical know-how, attitude towards work, and managerial skills, had a significant relationship with profitability, and customer satisfaction. Finally, age of the enterprise was found to have a significant relationship with growth in sales. In conclusion, all the variables had positive relationships with enterprise success, but not all the relationships were significant. It is recommended that cage fish farmers should be encouraged to invest more in technical education, which will help improve on the success of their enterprises. Furthermore, farmers should take precautions to reduce the risk of failure to increase their chances of success and survival.
Contribution/ Originality
The study contributes to existing literature to emphasize the relevance of human resource development in the areas of technical education and entrepreneurs’ attitude towards work to the success of cage fish farming. Therefore investment in human resource of entrepreneurs is necessary for the success of cage fish farmers’ enterprises.

Management in Public Utility Companies in Ghana: An Appraisal of Ghana Water Company Limited

Pages: 500-516
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Management in Public Utility Companies in Ghana: An Appraisal of Ghana Water Company Limited

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Citation: 3

Kwaku D. Kessey , Irene Ampaabeng

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Kwaku D. Kessey , Irene Ampaabeng (2014). Management in Public Utility Companies in Ghana: An Appraisal of Ghana Water Company Limited. International Journal of Management and Sustainability, 3(8): 500-516. DOI:
Urban water provision system in Ghana covers 70 percent of the resident population but it is estimated that only 40 per cent of residents connected to the supply system have regular supplies. The Ghana Water Company Limited (GWCL) which is responsible for production, distribution of potable water, billing and revenue collection from consumers is beset with many challenges. It faces several management challenges manifested in poor service delivery in terms of quantity and quality, poor cost recovery, weak capacity for operation and maintenance and poor financial management. This state of affairs has compelled the Government of Ghana to initiate reforms of the water sector including reengineering of the systems and possible Private Sector Participation in urban water provision. Presently, government has started physical expansion works in the water sector of many cities in Ghana. But not much has been done on the management system and its effect on water provision. The contention is that without effective management the expansion and reengineering works will not have sustainable effect on urban water provision. Given this scenario, Cape Coast, capital of Central region was chosen as case study on the management dimension of urban water provision. The institutional management assessment revealed that the GWCL as a quasi-state institution has limited autonomy for effective operation. This has culminated in poor performance and negative public image. The staff of the company admitted its poor service delivery and financial management. They are of the opinion that public-private partnership investment would improve the situation. However, consumers are unwilling to accept private investors’ participation in water provision due to the general perception that partnership will increase water tariffs. 


Contribution/ Originality

Evaluation of Conservation Costs and Benefits of Developing Conservation Strategies

Pages: 493-499
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Evaluation of Conservation Costs and Benefits of Developing Conservation Strategies

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Olanipekun N. O.

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Olanipekun N. O. (2014). Evaluation of Conservation Costs and Benefits of Developing Conservation Strategies. International Journal of Management and Sustainability, 3(8): 493-499. DOI:
Due to environmental degradation, depletion and overexploitation of natural resources caused by human activities resulted in development of strategies for conservation of species, habitats and resource. Hence, this paper thus examines the advantages of financial investment and critical elements associated with creating strategies for the conservation of various species. Interdependent to one another are fish, wildlife species, natural habitats as well as natural resources. It rightly observed that the most efficient environmental benefits will be gained through understanding of economic aspects of the costs side of biodiversity which will lead to novel and creative ways. The paper, therefore, concludes that it is better to recognize and incorporate costs at the outset of the planning process, rather than belatedly incur the higher costs of a less efficient plan.
Contribution/ Originality
This study originates new formula for biodiversity conservation through the incorporation of cost implication at the onset of developing conservation strategies. It takes cognizance of various species like fish, natural habitats, natural resources and wildlife species that are interdependent to each other so as to obtain most efficient environmental benefits.

The Inclination of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Students towards Entrepreneurship

Pages: 484-492
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The Inclination of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Students towards Entrepreneurship

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Citation: 2

Mior Nasir Mior Nazri , Zarinah Hamid , Herna Muslim

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Mior Nasir Mior Nazri , Zarinah Hamid , Herna Muslim (2014). The Inclination of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Students towards Entrepreneurship. International Journal of Management and Sustainability, 3(8): 484-492. DOI:
The lack of innovation in human capital in terms of quality and quantity as well as the   significant brain drain has retarded the progress of Malaysia towards becoming a developed country by 2020. In view of this situation, the Ministry of Higher Education (MoHE) of Malaysia has assigned the National Coordination Taskforce for Innovation (NCTI) to develop an innovative human capital (IHC) at tertiary level. One of the key elements in the IHC implementation plan is to enhance the entrepreneurial skills through education. The objective of this study is to investigate the perception and reception of non-business students on entrepreneurship education at the Faculty of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) of International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM). It examines the level of students’ inclination towards becoming entrepreneurs and their interest to learn entrepreneurial skills. The survey utilizes 96 usable responses of third and fourth year students from the faculty. The primary data consists of a set of survey questionnaires which include entrepreneurial intention, attitude towards entrepreneurship, subjective norms of entrepreneurship, perceived behavioral control over entrepreneurship, the influence of faculty on entrepreneurial behavior and the entrepreneurship learning propensity.  It provides some insights on the factors influencing ICT students to venture into entrepreneurship. It also suggests measures on the importance of graduates to become successful entrepreneurs and be less dependent on employers.
Contribution/ Originality
Various programs under the Minister of Higher Education (MOHE) of Malaysia have been implemented to attract more students’ involvement in entrepreneurship, yet the participation is still low especially from non-business students. Therefore, the reason of conducting this study is to identify the inclination of non-business students in IIUM towards entrepreneurship. It will help give awareness to the government and educational institutions on the factors that influence the students’ self-employment and subsequently encourage the participation of students, especially non-business students to be involved in entrepreneurship. In fact, a new curriculum policy and resources which fit the needs of future entrepreneurs could be planned in order for entrepreneurship education to be disseminated throughout college campuses. Compared to previous studies which concentrate on Business students, the scope of respondents in this study covers the technical field students in the Faculty of Information and Communication Technology. 

Corporate Governance, Sustainability and Capital Markets Orientation

Pages: 469-483
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Corporate Governance, Sustainability and Capital Markets Orientation

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Citation: 16

Daniela M. Salvioni , Francesca Gennari

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Daniela M. Salvioni , Francesca Gennari (2014). Corporate Governance, Sustainability and Capital Markets Orientation. International Journal of Management and Sustainability, 3(8): 469-483. DOI:
Generally accepted principles of effective corporate governance have taken hold in the context of different models of governance, whose implementation is also linked to the share structure of the companies and to the dynamics of risk’s capital markets. Global companies need a global approach in the acquisition of consensus and financial resources, first of all through a correct development of the corporate governance activities and promoting a market-driven management inspired by long-term sustainable development. In this context, the growing importance of sustainability and the concept of global responsibility in the relationships with stakeholders join together with the convergence of corporate governance rules, reducing the gap between insider and outsider systems. This paper, by means of a research on the first ten most capitalised companies listed in countries characterized by different capital market orientation and corporate governance models (Usa, UK, Germany, France and Italy), aims to underlines the relations between these two to deepen the requisites for a more effective and sustainable governance.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the existing literature to emphasize the importance of corporate governance approaches inspired on sustainability in the capital markets. A governance oriented to sustainability implies significant changes in the relationships with company’s stakeholders, shareholders in particular, promoting a trend of convergence between insider and outsiders systems.