Current Research in Agricultural Sciences

Published by: Conscientia Beam
Online ISSN: 2312-6418
Print ISSN: 2313-3716
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No. 1

Analysis of Climate Change Effects among Rice Farmers in Benue State, Nigeria

Pages: 7-15
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Analysis of Climate Change Effects among Rice Farmers in Benue State, Nigeria

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2016.3.1/68.1.7.15

Mbah, E.N. , Ezeano, C.I , Saror, S.F

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Mbah, E.N. , Ezeano, C.I , Saror, S.F (2016). Analysis of Climate Change Effects among Rice Farmers in Benue State, Nigeria. Current Research in Agricultural Sciences, 3(1): 7-15. DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2016.3.1/68.1.7.15
The study was carried out in Benue state, Nigeria to analyze climate change effects among rice farmers. Questionnaire/interview schedule was used to collect data from a sample of 90 respondents in the study area. Data were analyzed using frequency distribution, percentage, mean score and standard deviation. Findings of the study revealed that majority (82.2%) of the respondents were males; married (96.7%) with a mean age of about 44 years.  Major perceived causes of climate change were use of generators which produce fumes (M=2.16), continuous cropping (M=2.11), human activities (tillage) (M=1.94), use of inorganic manure (M=1.92), burning of fire wood (M=1.94), bush burning (M=1.82), deforestation (M=1.80), increase in population which leads to loose of farmland (M=1.80), land degradation due to soil erosion (M=1.60), over grazing of farmland by livestock (M=1.66), and burning of fossil fuel by industries and automobile (M=1.50), among others. Results also indicate that unemployment (M=1.74), desertification (M=1.68), loss of farmland to flood and erosion (M=1.64), increase vulnerability to soil erosion (M=1.56), increase in pests and diseases infestation in rice farms (M=1.52), increase in growth of weeds (M=1.56), easy loss of water from the soil (M=1.48), reduces soil fertility (M=1.42), causes stunted growth in rice crops (M=1.42), among others were perceived effects of climate change in rice production. Human activities such as deforestation, overgrazing of farmland by livestock, use of inorganic manure, etc. should be discouraged in order to cushion the effects of climate change as well as increasing productivity among rice farmers.

Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the existing literature by indicating effects of climate change which has been a source of concern that poses serious environmental threat to mankind. Climate change has been a major challenge for stakeholders in agricultural production resulting in poor yields of crops and loss of revenue for farmers.

Effect of Intra Spacing on Yield and Yield Components of Carrot (Daucus Carrota L.Sub Sp. Sativus)

Pages: 1-6
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Effect of Intra Spacing on Yield and Yield Components of Carrot (Daucus Carrota L.Sub Sp. Sativus)

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2016.3.1/68.1.1.6

Tadele Shiberu , Selomon Tamiru

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Tadele Shiberu , Selomon Tamiru (2016). Effect of Intra Spacing on Yield and Yield Components of Carrot (Daucus Carrota L.Sub Sp. Sativus). Current Research in Agricultural Sciences, 3(1): 1-6. DOI: 10.18488/journal.68/2016.3.1/68.1.1.6
The experiment was conducted in 2014 cropping seasons to study the effect of intra row spacing on yield and yield components of carrot. The crop was grown in July to October (105 days) with five treatments (5, 7.5, 10, 12.5 and 15 cm) in randomized complete block design with three replications. Root length, leaf fresh weight, root fresh weight, and root diameter weight were significantly different among treatments. The maximum root length (20.3 cm), root diameter (59.67 mm), root fresh weight (182. 33g plant-1) and fresh leave weight (129.67 g plant-1) were found in 15 cm spacing, whereas the highest total root yield per hectare was found in treatment 5 and 7.5cm; 55.15, and 54.75 ton, respectively.

Contribution/ Originality
The paper's primary contribution is finding that to study the effect of intra row spacing on yield and yield components of carrot on field. Then develop a correct intra row spacing to address the issues for carrot growers in Western Shawa of Ethiopia. The input gathered at this study provided an important perspective on the carrot intra row spacing and techniques used on the field.