Review of Knowledge Economy

Published by: Conscientia Beam
Online ISSN: 2409-9449
Print ISSN: 2412-3668
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No. 2

Developing a Mindset for Rapid Incremental Innovation

Pages: 74-89
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Developing a Mindset for Rapid Incremental Innovation

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.67/2014.1.2/67.2.74.89

Robert W. Service , David L. Loudon , David Sonius

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Robert W. Service , David L. Loudon , David Sonius (2014). Developing a Mindset for Rapid Incremental Innovation. Review of Knowledge Economy, 1(2): 74-89. DOI: 10.18488/journal.67/2014.1.2/67.2.74.89
Why do so many complicated crises flourish in a world that has the capabilities to solve these significant challenges?   Why has it taken so long for the world’s developed economies to grow after a deep recession? What are the keys to solving major problems and to grow economies?  It seems the means are there, but not the will to understand how we must go about realizing more from the vast human and technical capacity available today.  We posit that the path to improvement is for more individuals and organizations to innovate; that is, to improve effectiveness and efficiency in all they do. This improvement starts and ends with individual mindsets. 
This paper addresses these issues in a novel and non-academic way.  We do this in large part to stress a point that must be made in order for academics to become and remain innovative. 

Contribution/ Originality
This paper enhances readers’ ability to recognize and adapt personal and organizational mindsets toward clearer thinking in order to identify and realize more innovative opportunities.  The ideas presented are intended to provoke thinking so that readers learn to rapidly continuously and incrementally achieve the innovation imperative both individually and organizationally.

Igbu-Efi: Indigenous Practice and Politics of After-Death in Igbo Culture Area

Pages: 62-73
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Igbu-Efi: Indigenous Practice and Politics of After-Death in Igbo Culture Area

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.67/2014.1.2/67.2.62.73

Elochukwu A. Nwankwo , Okechukwu Anozie

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  1. Agha, U.A., 2012. Religion and culture in the permissive society. Enugu: SAPS Press (Nig).
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Elochukwu A. Nwankwo , Okechukwu Anozie (2014). Igbu-Efi: Indigenous Practice and Politics of After-Death in Igbo Culture Area. Review of Knowledge Economy, 1(2): 62-73. DOI: 10.18488/journal.67/2014.1.2/67.2.62.73
Indigenous practice and culture are among the things that make the Igbo distinctive from their adjoining neighbours. Much value is attached to indigenous practice and most adults are expected to be true custodians. In the funeral process of the Igbo, some aspects are given peculiar attention and interpretation. This is mostly attached to the second burial ceremonies where some indigenous practices are sacrosanct for the bidding of final farewell to the departed and the celebration that follows afterwards. The implication is that the act is a necessary distraction and economic desecrate in those Igbo culture areas where it is practiced. This paper examines this indigenous practice in the Igbo culture area; origin, reasons, implications, challenges and prospects, with a relevant case study. The methodology is purely ethnographic with constructive interview sessions organized amongst randomly selected key informants from Anambra, Enugu, Imo, Abia and Ebonyi states of the Igbo culture area of Nigeria.
Contribution/ Originality
This study documents the traditional burial practices of Igbos of Southeast Nigeria towards giving a more understanding to the Igbu-Efi which one of the indigenous practices of the people over the ages on issues concerning burial rites for their beloved ones. This would help in proper interpretation and promotion of this particular indigenous practice of the Igbos of Southeast Nigeria.

Ethnoarchaeological Survey of Obimo: A Fieldwork Report

Pages: 48-61
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Ethnoarchaeological Survey of Obimo: A Fieldwork Report

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.67/2014.1.2/67.2.48.61

Elochukwu Nwankwo

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Elochukwu Nwankwo (2014). Ethnoarchaeological Survey of Obimo: A Fieldwork Report. Review of Knowledge Economy, 1(2): 48-61. DOI: 10.18488/journal.67/2014.1.2/67.2.48.61
Iron smelting has been discovered to be amongst earliest technologies of Africans. It provided the earliest source of raw materials for blacksmithing in the African continent and at the same time formed a major part of the earliest economic base of the people. In the past many archaeological studies have concentrated on unearthing the earliest origin of this technology in the continent of Africa and its diversification or diffusion to other parts of the continent. Many of such studies have taken place in the Nsukka area of Enugu, Nigeria. Some of the communities in the Nsukka culture area have traces of this earliest technology in their environment with little or no significant answer to their origin. To this regard, this study is aimed at; studying one of the earliest technologies of Africans in this part of Nigeria, conduct a reconnaissance and ethnographic studies in Obimo community, excavate an iron smelting site in the community, determine the origin of the people and that of the iron smelting, and determine the cultural correlate of the extinct and extant societies of Obimo. Relevant research methods were adopted for efficient study of this kind. They include; reconnaissance survey, ethnography, excavation and documentary sources.



Contribution/ Originality
The study is one of the few studies which have investigated the earliest indigenous technologies of Africans with emphasis on iron smelting technology and pottery production in Obimo, Nsukka area of Nigeria. Its findings point to the fact that Iron smelting and pottery making was amongst the earliest indigenous technologies of Obimo Community which have gone into extinction.

Comparative Profitability Analysis of Watermelon and Pepper Production in Danko-Wasagu Local Government Area of Kebbi State, Nigeria

Pages: 39-47
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Comparative Profitability Analysis of Watermelon and Pepper Production in Danko-Wasagu Local Government Area of Kebbi State, Nigeria

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.67/2014.1.2/67.2.39.47

Citation: 2

Baba M.D. , J.M. Yelwa , G. Yakubu , I.D. Sanchi

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Baba M.D. , J.M. Yelwa , G. Yakubu , I.D. Sanchi (2014). Comparative Profitability Analysis of Watermelon and Pepper Production in Danko-Wasagu Local Government Area of Kebbi State, Nigeria. Review of Knowledge Economy, 1(2): 39-47. DOI: 10.18488/journal.67/2014.1.2/67.2.39.47
This research was carried out to examine the comparative profitability of watermelon and pepper production in Danko-Wasagu Local Government Area of Kebbi State, Nigeria. Proportionate random sampling technique was used to select sixty (60) watermelon producers and sixty (60) pepper producers. Thus, a total of one hundred and twenty respondents constitute the sample size for the study. Interview schedule was used to collect primary data from the respondents. The data collected were analyzed using percentage, farm budgeting technique and t-test statistics. Result revealed that majority of watermelon (75%) and pepper (71.6%) producers are males and that 56.67% of watermelon and 48.33% of pepper producers are within the age bracket of 31 – 40 years. Findings also revealed that net farm income for watermelon and pepper production were N 30, 946 and N 19, 592 per hectare, respectively. This therefore, indicated that both enterprises were profitable, but watermelon is more profitable than pepper. The rate of return on investment per hectare was estimated at 55.1% and 45.3% for watermelon and pepper, respectively. Hence, for every naira invested in watermelon and pepper production, the producers generated 55.1% and 43.5% as profit. However, theft, pest and diseases are the most severe problems faced by watermelon and pepper producers in the study area. It is therefore, recommended that adequate security measures and prompt pest and disease control measures will improve the overall productivity of both watermelon and pepper production which will in turn generate more income for the farmers.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes to the existing literature in Watermelon and Pepper production and will provide empirical information to policy makers in the formulation of appropriate policies. It will also serve as a guide to practicing and prospective farmers and to researchers who may investigate further into the subject matter.