International Journal of Education and Practice

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Online ISSN: 2310-3868
Print ISSN: 2311-6897
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No. 1

Reconceptualising Student Success

Pages: 37-46
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Reconceptualising Student Success

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2016.4.1/61.1.37.46

MCN Phewa

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MCN Phewa (2016). Reconceptualising Student Success. International Journal of Education and Practice, 4(1): 37-46. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2016.4.1/61.1.37.46
The phrase ’access for student success’ is familiar in the South African Higher Education (SAHE) sector since the formation of the Department of Education in 1994, a result from the desegregation of the then 17 racial departments. Numerous initiatives to address this concept have been instituted in different ways by the Higher Education (HE) institutions. These have taken the form of student support programmes which have, inter alia, included access and/or foundation provision, academic development initiatives, career development and employment preparation programmes. The University of South Africa (Unisa) has not been omitted in taking on similar initiatives. Unisa in its attempt to enhance student success offers academic development (AD) programmes such as the Science Foundation Provision (SFP), amongst others. However, academic development remains an ad-hoc activity being offered by different directorates working in silos and often times duplicating some of the services. This paper aims to present a proposal towards developing an integrated model for learner support whose objective is to identify students’ academic and career needs at the point of entry; refer them to appropriate learning and career development programmes; and thereafter enrol them in a job readiness training and placement programme (JRTP) in preparation for work-integrated learning (WIL) placements. This is a mixed methods study, involving a diagnostic academic literacies assessment, student and employer questionnaires as well as focus group discussions. Participants were ’employers’ of Unisa students in WIL programmes with and/or without the career development and JRTP experience as well as Unisa students in these programmes. It was found that most senior students view student success as obtaining a qualification, and being able to use such qualification in gainful employment.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the existing literature the notion that students perceive success as a combination of obtaining good grades and employability skills which will lead them to obtaining and retaining good employment. It further hopes to contribute towards development of support programmes that integrate academic development, job-readiness and placement.

Self-Efficacy of English Listening Skills in Japanese College EFL Learners

Pages: 21-36
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Self-Efficacy of English Listening Skills in Japanese College EFL Learners

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2016.4.1/61.1.21.36

Citation: 1

Yuichi Todaka

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Yuichi Todaka (2016). Self-Efficacy of English Listening Skills in Japanese College EFL Learners. International Journal of Education and Practice, 4(1): 21-36. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2016.4.1/61.1.21.36
This study investigated the effectiveness of the four sources of self-efficacy theory and the establishment of concrete English study objectives and guidance counseling sessions concerning the English listening skills of Japanese EFL learners.

Contribution/ Originality
This study documents that the establishment of concrete English study reasons is critical in helping Japanese college EFL learners have high self-efficacy beliefs about their English listening skills. However, a self-efficacy questionnaire should be carefully formulated. 

The Training Dilemma: Three Teachers’ Views of CPD

Pages: 12-20
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The Training Dilemma: Three Teachers’ Views of CPD

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2016.4.1/61.1.12.20

Ramesh Rao Ramanaidu , Kuruvilla C.K. Joseph , Ravichantiran Arujunan

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Ramesh Rao Ramanaidu , Kuruvilla C.K. Joseph , Ravichantiran Arujunan (2016). The Training Dilemma: Three Teachers’ Views of CPD. International Journal of Education and Practice, 4(1): 12-20. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2016.4.1/61.1.12.20
Continuous professional development (CPD) courses enable teachers to keep up with the latest developments in the field of teaching and learning.  However the modus operandi of conducting and delivering CPD courses is constantly questioned. The purpose of this research is to explore the issues related to the conducting and delivery of a CPD course. For the purpose of this study, three teachers who attended a CPD course were chosen. An interview protocol with ten open-ended questions was used to solicit information related to their experience in conducting an in-house course in their respective schools. The responses from the open-ended questions revealed that the teachers were unable to render the same experience to their colleagues due to a variety of reasons such as time factor, priority given by the school administrators and a lack of confidence. The findings suggest that the course organisers should stipulate the amount of time every school should allocate when conducting in-house courses and sufficient time should be allocated to teachers attending CPD to practise what they have learnt before they are asked to conduct an in-house course.

Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which investigates the challenges faced by teachers who attend Continuous Professional Courses. The study documents the dilemma faced by teachers who had attended a CPD and need to pass on the newly acquired knowledge and skills to their colleagues.

Mainstreaming ICT Mobile in Teaching Large Classes in Higher Learning Institutions in Tanzania: The Case of Ardhi University

Pages: 1-11
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Mainstreaming ICT Mobile in Teaching Large Classes in Higher Learning Institutions in Tanzania: The Case of Ardhi University

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2016.4.1/61.1.1.11

Citation: 1

Sophia R. Lukwale

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Sophia R. Lukwale (2016). Mainstreaming ICT Mobile in Teaching Large Classes in Higher Learning Institutions in Tanzania: The Case of Ardhi University. International Journal of Education and Practice, 4(1): 1-11. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2016.4.1/61.1.1.11
Mobile learning is part of a new learning landscape created by the availability of technologies supporting flexible, accessible, personalized education. With the increasing demand of over enrolment of students in higher learning institutions (HLI) around the world teaching of large classes has become an issue that requires close attention. This study was conducted to generate evidence for proposing solutions on how to mainstream mobile ICT technology and facilities in teaching and learning in expanding large classes in the higher learning institutions in Tanzania. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Random sampling was used for the selection of respondents. Study population consisted of 120 first to fifth year students. Generally, the findings of the study showed that most students (90.7%) are capable of using ICT facilities, 90% of the students agreed that the ICT facilities in the university need to be updated to suffice the demand posed by large classes as well as catch up with the increasing pace of Information and Communication Technology. The majority 96.9% use internet for studying purposes. Moreover, a small number of respondents 14% pointed out that the ICT facilities used are excellent. Furthermore, the results highlighted the challenges faced by students when taught in large classes.Based on the findings the HLI management can improve upon usage of mobile ICT technology in teaching large classes by increasing the ICT budget, setting clear rules to ensure students are taught using ICT facilities and include laptop/computer as a mandatory faculty requirement to students.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the existing literature on teaching large classes through mobile ICT in Tanzania where, little empirical evidence on the use of information technology exists. Additionally, it sought to find an innovative way to mainstream ICT as a solution to address the problem of teaching large classes.